Posts tagged "Pwn2Own"

The Evolution of Exploit Sophistication

When we look at the exploits that Adobe patched from February and March of this year, it is clear that today’s zero-day exploits are increasingly more sophisticated. This increase in sophistication is not limited to the skills needed to find and exploit the vulnerability. The code used to exploit the environment is also more robust in terms of code quality and testing. In short, exploit creation today requires the same level of rigor as professional software engineering projects.

Today’s advanced exploits need to be written to work in any target environment. For instance, February’s Reader 0-day supported 10 different versions of Reader with 2 sub-versions dependent on the end-user’s language. In addition, Flash Player CVE-2013-0634 had shell code for Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2003, Server 2003 R2, Server 2008 and Server 2008 R2 as well as supporting six versions of Flash Player. Variants of CVE-2013-0634 also supported Firefox and Safari on Mac OS X. An exploit developer would need a robust testing environment to ensure that the exploit would work in that many different environments for each version of Flash Player. The exploit writers even took into account different CPU architectures by including a signed 32-bit payload and a 64-bit payload. This reflects the fact that these exploits are written with professional code quality and stability requirements for distribution across a dynamic target base.

As vendors are increasing software defenses through techniques such as sandboxing, attackers are now combining multiple vulnerabilities from different vendors to achieve their goals.When I look at the reports from Pwn2Own and some of the recent zero-day reports such as CVE-2013-0643, attacks are moving toward combining vulnerabilities from multiple products, some of which are from different vendors. We are moving away from the model of single vulnerability exploits.

This is all a part of the natural evolution of the threat landscape and the commercialization of exploits. This will require an equal evolution on the part of vendors in their software defences. Karthik Raman and I will be discussing this topic, “Security Response in the Age of Mass Customized Attacks,” in more detail at the upcoming Hack in the Box Conference (HITB) Amsterdam next week. Please stop by our talk if you would like to discuss this further.

Peleus Uhley
Platform Security Strategist