Cote on Corpoblogging

The day seems to be progressing quite well over at the BarCampAustin con (though I’m definitely putting in the hardcore sneaker mileage today between the two locations!) – I’m sitting now in Cote’s BarCampAustin session on corpoblogging, which is a very interesting subject to me. At the moment, the discussion is centered on the high-level challenges of being an individual voice amidst a large corporation- great subject, and one I certainly have a few opinions on myself… ;-)


It can be a real challenge to balance the social responsibility of working for a company that supports a blogging culture alongside the need to be honest, direct and ‘real’ in one’s communication. Personally- I decided several years ago to keep my business opinions on this ‘official’ weblog, and my personal scribblings/annotated del.icio.us links/digg stories/etc. posted on my personal weblog (found here), but there’s a lot of varying opinions on what’s best for all concerned. As I’d been blogging on my personal website for a couple years before Macromedia even opened the blogging gates, this was more a concern when starting my ‘corpoblog’ than in changing how I was already blogging on a personal level. Whereas I used to post a few snippets on my personal weblog about the workplace, once I decided to ‘go corpo’ the split must made the most sense, personally.Although I sometimes feel incredibly schizophrenic separating my brainstreams and opinions this way, in meatspace I’ve always made an effort to keep my personal and professional lives as separate as possible, so my blogging habits are really more a mirror of my own reality. I don’t often bore my close friends in the ‘real world’ with day-to-day work discussions, nor am I particularly a fan of opening up my personal life for discussion in the office. But opinions in the room here vary greatly on this topic, and by no means do I find my solution one that applies to other personalities and situations.So… how do YOU manage your professional vs. personal interests and opinions as a ‘public voice’? It certainly helps me in volumes that Adobe has maintained a quite open and supportive attitude towards public-facing staffers like myself – so I do feel personally inclined to return the favor by keeping my more caustic and generally work-unrelated banter posted away from their servers – but not having the (mis)fortune of working for less tolerant companies in the past, I’m really curious as to how others have juggled the conflicts of interests that arise as a ‘corpoblogger’.Do tell?