Posts tagged "facebook"

Facebook Promotion Rules Get A Facelift

All change, all change!

Huge news out of Facebook’s policy department last week — You no longer need a 3rd Party Application to run a promotion.

There will be some of you thinking “Huh? We used to need to do what?” Some of you jumping for joy, shouting “Finally!!” at the top of your lungs and also some who have their heads in their hands at the news that news feeds are potentially going to be clogged up with Like contest after Like contest…

So, let’s get down to the nitty gritty. What are the new rules?

First, lets clarify. You can still run a competition in an app so there is no need to delete your existing apps or throw away any plans to ever run an app promotion ever again – there are still very good reasons to run your promotion via an app.

The new rules are…

  • You can now use Likes or comments as an entry mechanism and/or a voting mechanism.
  • Private messages are also a valid method of entry.

BUT….

  • You cannot ask a Fan to Share to enter a competition
  • You cannot ask Fans to tag themselves in your content as a method of entry.

The no Shares rules still stands as it would be tough to run a fair contest using this entry method since some profiles are private and you cannot track Shares accurately.

So, what are the pros and the cons to the new rules?

Pros…

  • Easier engagement
  • More frequent promotions
  • Timely and relevant content promotions – ability to capitalize on current events

Cons…

  • Harder to track and may be a manual process to gather the entrants
  • Competition overload… Fans may reach social fatigue quicker with all the new contests in the stream
  • Unable to brand promotions like you would within an app
  • Rules still exist for Page promotions and you must still make those clear (manage submissions, choose winner fairly, agreement of terms, acknowledgement that Facebook in no way endorses your competition etc…  More here — https://www.facebook.com/page_guidelines.php
  • Cannot capture email addresses

In short, if you’re looking to run a big campaign promotion then an app might still be best, it looks credible and it allows you to be more creative with your contest. If you’re looking to do short daily giveaways then these new rules have just made that a whole lot easier.

For the words straight from Facebook’s mouth, check out their blog post — https://www.facebook.com/facebookforbusiness/news/page-promotions-terms

 

But I want ALL of our fans to see ALL of our Facebook posts…

I used to think everything I published on Facebook reached all of my friends, and I assumed the same for Adobe’s brand page content. Heck, I’d bet many of the executives us social media managers report results to think all of our content reaches all of our fans. But alas, it does not.

Earlier this past Fall, there were lots of discussions about EdgeRank, and how brands aren’t able to get their Facebook posts to reach more fans. Some folks suggested Facebook is nefariously dubious in changing their algorithms. I, however, tend to side with Mike from PostRocket on this: Facebook changes their algorithm all the time; they do it to help the user and not to penalize brands or make them spend more. Mike’s advice is good, “Stop complaining and produce better content. Trust me, you’ll be rewarded.”

So let’s assume you are taking great pains to make your Facebook page posts more readable and followable, but you still want to ensure they are reaching as many fans as possible…what can you do?

Take a look at Facebook Interest Lists

Facebook Interest Lists were launched in early 2012. This feature encourages fans to make Interest Lists for pages whose content they don’t want to miss. It’s like a personalized newspaper of sorts, for users to follow certain topics. (Not far off from Twitter lists.)

It’s important to note that Facebook Interest Lists don’t appear to affect EdgeRank (from what our Edelman Digital agency team saw in their research), but it does appear to be a great way for users to bypass Facebook’s auto-processes to ensure they receive all of a company or brand’s content.

Here’s how:

Step 1: On any page, click the gear icon next to the “Liked” icon (lower right of main profile image)
Step 2: Add to Interest List
Step 3: Like, share and interact with the content!

Simple.

Additionally, soon to be everywhere on Facebook (we think…), the new “Get Notification” feature.

This has been available on personal pages but just recently rolled out for some brand/company pages (though not all pages have this feature yet).

When users click to receive notifications from a brand page, they’ll receive both a desktop notification (if on Facebook) and a mobile alert. Great for fans who don’t want to miss a thing, and incredibly useful for social media managers when there are real calls-to-action posts.

Image from Marketing Land

Image from Marketing Land

Is your company doing anything else to help ensure your fans are getting all your Facebook posts? Let us know in the comments.

The Lowdown On Global Facebook Pages

 

A single global Facebook Page or several local Pages?

Until now, if you were a brand posting on Facebook, those were your options.

Historically, this choice has been tricky when deciding on a strategy for your brand, as both came with their own set of pros and cons.

Single Global Page

  • Large global fan count
  • One Page in search
  • One vanity URL

BUT…

  • No way to localize content/look (i.e. cover photo, profile picture)
  • Limited regional insights data
  • Geo-targeting can be tiresome

Local Pages

  • Localized look to Pages
  • Regional insights data

BUT…

  • Search is cluttered
  • Fan counts are smaller (Fans tend to check the validity of the Page by the Fan count first)
  • No global community

Facebook has eliminated some of these pain points by introducing Global Pages for those brands with managed accounts (i.e. those with an Account Manager at Facebook).

What does this bring to the table? Read on…

  • Brands can have a Global Page and localized Pages (Local Pages), all using one Facebook URL.
  • Users will automatically see their most relevant Local Page, determined by a number of factors, including the users IP address.
  • Brands will have the ability to learn about all customers through one set of global insights, which include robust localized data.
  • Aggregated Like count and PTAT stats shown across all Pages.
  • Eliminates a cluttered Facebook search experience by only offering one brand Page option. Which also eliminates the possibility of a Fan liking the wrong Local Page.

Global Pages can…

  • Offer a localized look, such as localized cover photo, profile picture, news feed, apps, milestones, ‘about’ section and even a translated brand name.
  • Direct those fans without a Local Page to the Global Page as the default.
  • Group audiences by language. i.e. All English-speaking fans could be directed to one Local Page for US, UK etc. – N.B. This approach is not recommended if detailed demographic data is important to you
  • Geo-target posts on Local Pages to specific cities

Global Pages can’t…

  • Cover markets, you don’t cover – therefore if you want Local Pages, you must have the support in place in those countries to run those Pages, as Fans directed to Local Pages, will not receive updates posted by the default Global Page.
  • Show Local Page Managers stats from other Local Pages or the Global Page.
  • Publish from the Global Page to all Local Pages – Local Page Managers must post their own separate updates.

One of the major issues when choosing the single brand Page strategy was that brands lose the detailed demographic data they have with the individual local brand Pages. This update means that brands get the best of both worlds, one simple, clean URL and the robust analytics of a local Page.

Aside from a simpler search process, the user experience will remain unchanged. Fans won’t see the redirect; they will automatically see the localized Page. If a Fan prefers to receive updates from a different region, they still have the ability to select an alternative Local Page by clicking ‘Switch Region” in the gear menu near the cover photo.

Brands are now only left asking themselves two questions:

  • Do we have adequate support in local markets?
  • Do we have local audiences, which would benefit from regular targeted content and a localized look?

If the answer to both is yes, then leveraging Global Pages is the solution.

Global Pages are a great addition for large global organizations with worldwide markets and a support infrastructure to match. For these organisations, the decision is a no-brainer. If they have the support necessary to run several Pages and they desire the clout of a global Fan count and a single URL, then this is the obvious choice for them. They can localize the look and the content and keep track of their local audiences’ wants and needs – all without losing out on any Global stats.

For those brands that don’t have adequate support in local markets or don’t feel they could generate enough local content to warrant a separate Local Pages? — The old single brand Page structure is the most beneficial. Local Pages can, of course, be added as the brand and it’s markets change and grow.

For smaller brands, aside from probably having less of a need for a global presence, it is likely that they won’t have a Facebook Account Manager and therefore the Global Pages option won’t yet be available to them.

Interest Targeting Is the Next Step for Brands Advertising on Twitter

By: Asma Stephan

Twitter has expanded their ad program with the use of interest targeting. While Promoted Tweets and Promoted Accounts give brands some ability to target users, the potential reach of these campaigns was limited to Tweeters who shared interests with current followers.

According to today’s announcement on the Twitter blog, interest targeting will not only help brands broaden their reach, but also more precisely target their audience.

For a broad reach, brands can target users using a comprehensive list of over 350 different interest categories, such as Home and Garden, or Style and Fashion or Hobbies and Interests.

This puts Twitter’s ad campaigns in a better position to compete with Facebook’s targeted ad offering, which features a similar checklist of categories. Brands who’ve seen success targeting niche audiences on Facebook would do well to incorporate interest targeting on Twitter.

Alternatively, brands can target a custom segment of specific Tweeters and any followers with shared interests. They can specify any relevant Twitter handles associated with the product, event, or initiative the brand is interested in promoting in order to reach a tight-knit network of Twitter users.

Targeting a set of users this way offers an especially provocative possibility: allowing brands the ability target their competition’s followers.

Though Twitter hasn’t released any hard data about the success of interest targeting, they report promising results, saying:

“[Beta advertisers] have seen significantly increased audience reach; others have creatively defined custom audiences to reach a very specific set of users. Across the board, they are seeing high engagement rates because they are reaching users who are interested in their content.”

Precisely reaching an audience with highly customized, highly targeted promotions is the holy grail of social media marketing. Twitter’s latest offering could prove to be a huge step in the right direction for brands.

What is your take on Twitter’s interest targeting? Do you already use Promoted Tweets and Promoted Accounts? Does this launch make you more likely to create a Twitter marketing campaign? Tell us in the comments below!

When do we get a “want” button? Facebook’s first earnings call

Yesterday afternoon, Facebook held its first earnings call with Wall Street analysts to discuss its second quarter results. There’s plenty of discussion on the Internet about the actual results so I won’t rehash them here, but during the Q&A there were a few questions that alluded to Facebook’s future that I found interesting. As someone who spends a lot of time thinking about social commerce, I found the discussion between by Lauren Martin, equity analyst at Needham & Company, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg the most fascinating part of the conference call. I’ve posted a portion of the transcript for you to read but the point I found interesting is that Facebook is approaching each industry (advertising, gaming, music, media, and commerce) in a unique way that will require a nuanced approach in the business model and user experience. They key phrase that Mark highlights is how “more nuanced experiences will become social.”  It’s unclear exactly how this will translate to commerce but philosophically, I agree with his approach. Facebook, and the industry in general, will need to continue to experiment to uncover this nuanced approach to commerce in social.

(Transcript provided by SeekingAlpha)

http://seekingalpha.com/article/755071-facebook-management-discusses-q2-2012-results-earnings-call-transcript?page=9&p=qanda

Laura A. Martin – Needham & Company, LLC, Research Division

A couple for Mark. So Mark, we’ve been writing a lot about the optionality or the option value of the Facebook platform globally. And I guess, I’m really interested outside the visible revenue streams, which today are payments in advertising. Could you talk through how you’re thinking about commerce on this platform? And also video, because video is one of the most shared things, as you know. As we think about over the next 3 to 5 years other revenue streams, how do you think philosophically about what Facebook could become over a longer period of time in terms of revenue streams?

Mark Zuckerberg

Sure. Well, the basic approach that we have for now is we’re building out this platform and other companies can build on top of that. And you can view our business as an advertising and payments business or you could view it as there will be these companies that help to transform these industries, and we will get some portion of the value that comes from that, that we’re helping to provide, right? So in gaming, for example, we think that we’re helping to provide a lot of the value, so we end up getting a relatively high percentage of the revenue that comes into those companies. Whereas in something like music or some of the media companies that are now getting built using Open Graph, I think we aren’t providing quite as much of the percentage of the value as with games, so the overall amount of the revenue that comes to Facebook through, whether whatever the breakdown of ads and payments is, I think, will be somewhat less. But a lot of people will do that stuff, too. So I think the real way to think about this is that over time, more and more nuanced experiences will become social. So gaming is such a basic thing that people want to do with their friends, so even with a relatively basic platform, people could build that ecosystem out. Some of the media stuff required more nuance. I think commerce will require a little more and so on. But as these things get built out, I think we’ll build out the tools to both enable those products to get built and to be able to capture some percentage of the value that we’re helping to create. But I mean, I don’t really have any more plans that I’m going to share with you today about our product roadmap or anything like that.

Sheryl K. Sandberg

One thing to think about in the commerce area or in other areas like video is that our view of the world is things become increasingly social. And that takes time. Gaming was obviously first. But people are informed when they purchase things by their friends, and the commerce companies that are really adopting social are seeing good responses. Fab is one of them. Fab is very early on in its history, but it’s a truly social shopping experience. And they’re seeing near 20% to 40% of their traffic from Facebook on a daily basis, as well as a very good return on their investment on ads that their CEO has been talking about publicly. We look out at what people’s shopping behaviors are. And so much of them really — so much of their shopping behaviors really are social, that we think there’s a big opportunity for the social context that we offer to be a major part of how people discover products.