Posts tagged "Social Media"

How The Black Keys’ drummer could teach brands a thing or two.

It’s been a busy couple of weeks in the land of Twitter, @BurgerKing and @Jeep were hacked and @MTV and @BET pretended to be.

If you were following Twitter closely, you might have also seen the Twitter spat between Justin Bieber and the drummer from The Black Keys, Patrick Carney.

The Black Keys had enjoyed a successful night at the Grammy’s with three wins for the band and another for the lead singer Dan Auerbach. Afterwards, Carney was interviewed by TMZ and asked whether Bieber should have got a Grammy by now. He replied with “He’s rich, right?… Grammys are for music, not for money… and he’s making a lot of money. He should be happy.”

Bieber then took to Twitter to publish this Tweet to his 34 million followers.

 

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Almost immediately, Bieber’s loyal following had waged war against Carney. While this would have sent many running for the hills and deleting their Twitter accounts, Carney held his own by replying to comments using humour and retweeting particularly funny ‘disses’.

 

ONE HIT WONDER

 

LIKE RIGHT NOW?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally he boldly started to assume the singers identity by gradually changing his name to Justin Bieber and replying as if he was the singer. This of course, further infuriated Bieber fans – as well as picking up some unsuspecting followers who thought he was the real deal.

 

BIEBER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aside from annoying a small number of his real fans with a few days worth of ‘Justin’ tweets, he actually managed to ride the storm by meeting it head-on and he also got a lot of love from how he was handling the angry Bieber-fan onslaught.

 

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So what can brands learn from how he handled himself?

Carney dealt with the situation swiftly, without fear and he let his personality work for him.

He was of course, able to be far more ‘cheeky’ than most brands could hope to get away with and while we would never advise brands to use these particular tactics, there are some take away lessons here for brands posting their day-to-day content or experiencing their own social media crisis.

Don’t be scared.

Carney didn’t shy away from dealing with negative comments. Brands – particularly if they are new to social – can be tempted to bury their heads in the sand when dealing with difficult posts (or sometimes, any posts) and may choose to ignore them, hoping they’ll go away.

Ignore the ‘wrong’ one and it could have the potential to turn a customer service issue into a full-blown social media crisis. Rule number one — Make sure you respond quickly to questions or problems.

Carney was swift to act, replied to posts and also retweeted them so it was clear to everyone who visited his profile or anyone following his updates that he was dealing with the situation and may have even discouraged some angry tweeters from joining in. We’ve seen a lot of high profile cases recently where people have been driven off Twitter by a furious mob, simply because they felt like it was easier to run away, rather than weather the storm.

For these larger, social media crises, make sure you have a process written down for managing this type of event – while we’re sure Carney didn’t have his plan in place before the Grammy’s, his quick thinking did help him survive the fallout. Brands may have to go through a series of different stakeholders before a plan can be acted upon, so it is essential that this process be nailed down.

Be yourself. Be human.

We’ve all heard it before, but it’s true. Social should be social. People aren’t interested in interacting with boring staid messaging. They want to feel like a brand or person has an identity. Whether that’s in everyday posts or in how they handle a crisis.

Behind all the big strategies, campaigns and messaging should lie a human heartbeat. Carneys’ decision to go bold and his brilliant use of light-hearted humour in the face of some pretty nasty and sometimes homophobic posts, made this into a much more positive news story that it would have been if he’d hidden away from it. He could have passed this over to an agency and released a statement but he chose to ride the storm with his own personal brand of humour.

For brands, you will know when posts require a serious response but it’s just as important to know when it’s okay to interact in a more human, relaxed way.

People want to feel like they are interacting with a real person. I’m sure everyone following Carney’s news feed feels like they know him a bit better, even when he was masquerading as Bieber, and if you manage to convey this type of messaging for your brand, it will go a long way to help building some brand love amongst your following.

Use humour.

Don’t be afraid to use humour in your messaging if the situation or your branding allows it. A serious customer service issue would not be the place for this method but as Carney saw, treating his crisis with light humour, worked pretty well for him. You also saw this with the recent Burger King hack on their Twitter account. Once they had regained control, instead of releasing a very serious statement, they made it light-hearted and recognised that they had picked up a lot of new followers.

 

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Carney, Burger King and Jeep have all have seen this positive side of their recent social media crises as they’ve added some hefty numbers to their Twitter follower count. It goes to show that if dealt with in the right way, a negative can be turned into a positive. If they keep the right mix of entertainment, value and transparency and let their ‘brands’ personality shine through, they may just keep all their new followers happy.

Keep this mix in your social feeds and you’ll start to reap the benefits too!

Have YOU heard it on the grape…Vine?

 

Vine –- The new kid on the block. We all like new toys to play with but does this one add value to a brand’s marketing efforts? We take a look…

 

What is Vine?

Vine is a new app launched by Twitter. According to them, it “lets you create and share beautiful, short looping videos” that will play directly in your Twitter or Vine news feed (Vines uploaded to Facebook will play in another window). These videos are limited to six second loops but you can stop and start the recording at will, so you can shoot in tiny sections like a flick book if you wish and videos are shareable if uploaded to a social network.

Can we really create good video content in six seconds?

Urban Outfitters shared a simple video that will appeal to one of their core demographics.

 

Bacardi UK have been demoing cocktails made with their drink, and inviting further engagement by asking followers what they’d like to see next.

 

Everyone had the same reservations about Twitter, how could we possibly say what we needed in 140 characters or less? We soon saw that the real beauty of Twitter was exactly that limitation — it forced you to creative and concise.
Brevity is particularly important online as a readers attention span is short. So when it comes to Vine, six seconds is pretty perfect for someone whizzing through their Twitter feed and this means that the right content could be incredibly shareable.

How can brands can use it?

  • Behind-the-scenes clips — share a snapshot of a day in the life of your brand or the history behind your brand
  • Demo your products in six seconds!
  • Show sneak peeks of upcoming products, announcements or new advertisements
  • Create a Vine competition where your fans submit the content to Twitter using a specific hashtag
  • Let your staff get creative! See what content they can come up with that might be interesting to your fans and customers. Maybe they can answer common questions or share tips?
  • Endorsements! Film your happy customers recommending your brand! (With their permission of course) Or ask them to submit Vines to you, for you to share.

If you decide to use Vine as a content creator for your brand, above all, remember that Vine is like any other medium you would use to create content. Make sure your videos are creative, shareable and relevant to your audience, and continue to test what works best for your community. Your content should still be high quality, even if it’s in six-second snapshots.

The Rules

  • Make your Vine visually exciting and creative
  • Ensure the message is on-brand
  • Ensure it has a message! Whether that’s promoting office culture, or showcasing a new product – it should have value for the both the brand and the viewer
  • Include tags/hashtags to make your content searchable
  • Share on other social platforms to ensure maximum visibility

Still need some inspiration? Check how other brands are already using it — http://brandsonvine.com/

The Evolution of Social Media at Adobe

Maria PoveromoA lot of brands are still trying to solve for social media organization, activation and ROI. We thought we’d share a Q&A we had with Maria Poveromo, who has led and evolved our own social media efforts, to share some successes and takeaways from the past year.

What are your thoughts on the value of social business to an organization, and can you talk about how Adobe is organized around social media?

Social media represents a tremendous opportunity and paradigm shift for brands. For several years, brands were at the center of their marketing efforts – they controlled the message, their story, and how it was told publicly through designated spokespeople. Social media has turned this traditional communications model on its head. Today, customers are at the center of communications. In many cases, they can drive and shift brand perceptions by vocalizing their views on a brand or its products and services.  Social media has also enabled brands to build direct relationships with customers at a level of magnitude that is unprecedented.  The brands that embrace these shifts stand to win.  So it is critical for businesses today to organize their social media programs, resource them adequately, engage with customers authentically and measure their effectiveness in order to be successful.

Adobe’s social media program was founded in December 2009 after we discovered great pockets of innovation across the company that were occurring in silos and lacking an overarching strategy. We adopted the popular “Hub and Spoke” model. The hub (or center of excellence) would enable more coordinated and strategic social media across the company through a common set of guidelines, trainings, and infrastructure, while the spokes (subject matter experts) would drive day-to-day social strategies for their specific line of business.  Today, Adobe has moved towards the multiple hub and spoke model, where teams worldwide have established their own hub and spokes based on growing needs, with a dotted line to the teams at corporate.

2012 was a year where social media played a larger role in Adobe’s integrated campaign efforts like Create Now and Metrics Not Myths. There was room to test and take more risk. Thoughts on successes and takeaways for each campaign?

It is true that in 2012, social media started to play a strategic and critical role in campaign development and execution. The two primary campaigns that we launched as a company in 2012 were very different.

“Create Now” represents Adobe’s traditional DNA – enabling creative professionals to unleash their creativity with our tools and services.  With “Create Now,” we focused on introducing the Creative Cloud and the opportunities it introduced to create freely and receive ongoing product updates with a relatively low price barrier.

The “Create Now” campaign represented the first time we launched a social campaign in a truly global fashion with a diligent focus on measuring tangible ROI.  We delivered robust and engaging content to activate our fan base and experimented with games including real and virtual or online scavenger hunts to drive engagement.  We also encouraged trial downloads and eventually purchase of our new offering.   Through our rigorous measurement we were able to demonstrate high volumes of engagement with our customers, positive sentiment and significant ROI.

“Metrics not Myths” is a new type of campaign for Adobe.  While Adobe is traditionally associated with our creative side of the business, few people know that a large portion of Adobe’s business is also focused on digital marketing. In order to drive greater awareness for Adobe’s leadership position in digital marketing, we launched a provocative campaign that focused on debunking traditional myths about marketing.

Through this campaign we learned that not all of our experimental efforts will be successful.  In this case, we tried to establish a community of digital marketers on Facebook through an application through which we featured live debates and real time polling to engage our audience.  We did not attract the number of marketers that we hoped we would and the level of engagement was lower than our target but we were able to grow our Twitter and Facebook communities and learn from these efforts.

One aspect of the program that was highly successful was the “ultimate case study” where we published the real-time results and takeaways from the campaign as it was being executed.

I think we are learning as we go with both campaigns. For Create Now, we want to focus on the ongoing value that a Creative Cloud membership provides as members have access to ongoing updates and benefits. For “Metrics not Myths” we are targeting ourselves – digital marketers who are in the market for solutions that ease our day to day tasks and ultimately help us prove the ROI of our efforts. Both are challenging and exciting in their own ways.

Social media ROI is a hot topic. You have team that spearheads measurement, analytics and even social e-commerce. What’s your perspective on ROI for social, particularly a B2B organization?

Adobe is fortunate to own analytics solutions that allow us to track and determine the impact of our social media efforts against traditional demand generation success metrics such as trial download, website traffic, and ultimately, revenue.

However, I believe that the true value of social media extends beyond ROI and demand generation. To me, the true value of social media lies in the interactions a brand has with its customers, and the consequent actions those customers take on behalf of the brand by defending it in times of crisis and promoting their positive experiences with your brand with their extended networks. Business impact and ROI are most certainly very important – and we extend great effort to measure and report on these metrics in order to improve our programs and prove their worth.  At the same time, the value of building strong relationships with your customers is intangible but equally important.

Adobe just hit 10M fans and followers across its social media presence. Any plans you can share about activating them in the year ahead?

A primary focus of ours in 2013 will be to further activate our social media influencers and advocates by building more organized and consistent programs that recognize and reward our advocates for their actions. As mentioned, I believe the true value of social media lies in the relationships a brand builds with its customers.  We hope to continue to delight our fans and followers by listening to their requests and by continuing to deliver compelling and engaging content.

Pinterest Rolls Out Official Business Pages

 

With Pinterest recently hitting the top 50 most visited websites in the US and the news that Convertro placed them with the honour of driving more revenue per click than Facebook or Twitter — Pinterest needed to get serious about their business customers. And they have.

Pinterest announced the roll-out of new tools for businesses. Whether you currently have an account or are ready to launch yours, these tools will be a great benefit.

Until now, commercial usage was technically prohibited so the new updates come with their own terms of service for business. Brands also have the option to add a single brand name to their Page rather than using the first name, last name format that was the previous option. There is also now a verification process (much like verified accounts on Twitter) to add validity to the account.

To further encourage adoption, Pinterest has also provided resources for businesses, such as case studies and best practices, to ensure they get the most out of the growing platform.

A business account also comes with goodies, which include ‘pin it’ and ‘Follow me’ buttons for your website. According to Cat Lee, Pinterest’s Product Manager, Pinterest is hoping “to add more tools and features that are geared toward this audience.”

 

So with these extra developments, should your brand be on Pinterest? It isn’t for every business, but if you have visually interesting products and/or are willing to share content that isn’t solely about your business, such as inspirations and trends that will resonate with your branding, then it could be worth the extra time and effort.

According to Media Bistro, “59 percent of Pinterest users have purchased an item they saw on the pinboarding site” and “79 percent of Pinterest users are more likely to purchase items they’ve seen on Pinterest, compared with Facebook users purchasing behaviour”. This clearly isn’t a decision to be taken lightly; it’s well worth giving some thought to whether your brand would benefit from a presence on Pinterest as it could impact on sales revenue for your business.

 

 

 

 

 

The Lowdown On Global Facebook Pages

 

A single global Facebook Page or several local Pages?

Until now, if you were a brand posting on Facebook, those were your options.

Historically, this choice has been tricky when deciding on a strategy for your brand, as both came with their own set of pros and cons.

Single Global Page

  • Large global fan count
  • One Page in search
  • One vanity URL

BUT…

  • No way to localize content/look (i.e. cover photo, profile picture)
  • Limited regional insights data
  • Geo-targeting can be tiresome

Local Pages

  • Localized look to Pages
  • Regional insights data

BUT…

  • Search is cluttered
  • Fan counts are smaller (Fans tend to check the validity of the Page by the Fan count first)
  • No global community

Facebook has eliminated some of these pain points by introducing Global Pages for those brands with managed accounts (i.e. those with an Account Manager at Facebook).

What does this bring to the table? Read on…

  • Brands can have a Global Page and localized Pages (Local Pages), all using one Facebook URL.
  • Users will automatically see their most relevant Local Page, determined by a number of factors, including the users IP address.
  • Brands will have the ability to learn about all customers through one set of global insights, which include robust localized data.
  • Aggregated Like count and PTAT stats shown across all Pages.
  • Eliminates a cluttered Facebook search experience by only offering one brand Page option. Which also eliminates the possibility of a Fan liking the wrong Local Page.

Global Pages can…

  • Offer a localized look, such as localized cover photo, profile picture, news feed, apps, milestones, ‘about’ section and even a translated brand name.
  • Direct those fans without a Local Page to the Global Page as the default.
  • Group audiences by language. i.e. All English-speaking fans could be directed to one Local Page for US, UK etc. – N.B. This approach is not recommended if detailed demographic data is important to you
  • Geo-target posts on Local Pages to specific cities

Global Pages can’t…

  • Cover markets, you don’t cover – therefore if you want Local Pages, you must have the support in place in those countries to run those Pages, as Fans directed to Local Pages, will not receive updates posted by the default Global Page.
  • Show Local Page Managers stats from other Local Pages or the Global Page.
  • Publish from the Global Page to all Local Pages – Local Page Managers must post their own separate updates.

One of the major issues when choosing the single brand Page strategy was that brands lose the detailed demographic data they have with the individual local brand Pages. This update means that brands get the best of both worlds, one simple, clean URL and the robust analytics of a local Page.

Aside from a simpler search process, the user experience will remain unchanged. Fans won’t see the redirect; they will automatically see the localized Page. If a Fan prefers to receive updates from a different region, they still have the ability to select an alternative Local Page by clicking ‘Switch Region” in the gear menu near the cover photo.

Brands are now only left asking themselves two questions:

  • Do we have adequate support in local markets?
  • Do we have local audiences, which would benefit from regular targeted content and a localized look?

If the answer to both is yes, then leveraging Global Pages is the solution.

Global Pages are a great addition for large global organizations with worldwide markets and a support infrastructure to match. For these organisations, the decision is a no-brainer. If they have the support necessary to run several Pages and they desire the clout of a global Fan count and a single URL, then this is the obvious choice for them. They can localize the look and the content and keep track of their local audiences’ wants and needs – all without losing out on any Global stats.

For those brands that don’t have adequate support in local markets or don’t feel they could generate enough local content to warrant a separate Local Pages? — The old single brand Page structure is the most beneficial. Local Pages can, of course, be added as the brand and it’s markets change and grow.

For smaller brands, aside from probably having less of a need for a global presence, it is likely that they won’t have a Facebook Account Manager and therefore the Global Pages option won’t yet be available to them.