Posts tagged "twitter"

How The Black Keys’ drummer could teach brands a thing or two.

It’s been a busy couple of weeks in the land of Twitter, @BurgerKing and @Jeep were hacked and @MTV and @BET pretended to be.

If you were following Twitter closely, you might have also seen the Twitter spat between Justin Bieber and the drummer from The Black Keys, Patrick Carney.

The Black Keys had enjoyed a successful night at the Grammy’s with three wins for the band and another for the lead singer Dan Auerbach. Afterwards, Carney was interviewed by TMZ and asked whether Bieber should have got a Grammy by now. He replied with “He’s rich, right?… Grammys are for music, not for money… and he’s making a lot of money. He should be happy.”

Bieber then took to Twitter to publish this Tweet to his 34 million followers.

 

Screen shot 2013-02-25 at 11.37.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost immediately, Bieber’s loyal following had waged war against Carney. While this would have sent many running for the hills and deleting their Twitter accounts, Carney held his own by replying to comments using humour and retweeting particularly funny ‘disses’.

 

ONE HIT WONDER

 

LIKE RIGHT NOW?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally he boldly started to assume the singers identity by gradually changing his name to Justin Bieber and replying as if he was the singer. This of course, further infuriated Bieber fans – as well as picking up some unsuspecting followers who thought he was the real deal.

 

BIEBER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aside from annoying a small number of his real fans with a few days worth of ‘Justin’ tweets, he actually managed to ride the storm by meeting it head-on and he also got a lot of love from how he was handling the angry Bieber-fan onslaught.

 

Screen shot 2013-02-26 at 14.22.28

 

 

 

 

So what can brands learn from how he handled himself?

Carney dealt with the situation swiftly, without fear and he let his personality work for him.

He was of course, able to be far more ‘cheeky’ than most brands could hope to get away with and while we would never advise brands to use these particular tactics, there are some take away lessons here for brands posting their day-to-day content or experiencing their own social media crisis.

Don’t be scared.

Carney didn’t shy away from dealing with negative comments. Brands – particularly if they are new to social – can be tempted to bury their heads in the sand when dealing with difficult posts (or sometimes, any posts) and may choose to ignore them, hoping they’ll go away.

Ignore the ‘wrong’ one and it could have the potential to turn a customer service issue into a full-blown social media crisis. Rule number one — Make sure you respond quickly to questions or problems.

Carney was swift to act, replied to posts and also retweeted them so it was clear to everyone who visited his profile or anyone following his updates that he was dealing with the situation and may have even discouraged some angry tweeters from joining in. We’ve seen a lot of high profile cases recently where people have been driven off Twitter by a furious mob, simply because they felt like it was easier to run away, rather than weather the storm.

For these larger, social media crises, make sure you have a process written down for managing this type of event – while we’re sure Carney didn’t have his plan in place before the Grammy’s, his quick thinking did help him survive the fallout. Brands may have to go through a series of different stakeholders before a plan can be acted upon, so it is essential that this process be nailed down.

Be yourself. Be human.

We’ve all heard it before, but it’s true. Social should be social. People aren’t interested in interacting with boring staid messaging. They want to feel like a brand or person has an identity. Whether that’s in everyday posts or in how they handle a crisis.

Behind all the big strategies, campaigns and messaging should lie a human heartbeat. Carneys’ decision to go bold and his brilliant use of light-hearted humour in the face of some pretty nasty and sometimes homophobic posts, made this into a much more positive news story that it would have been if he’d hidden away from it. He could have passed this over to an agency and released a statement but he chose to ride the storm with his own personal brand of humour.

For brands, you will know when posts require a serious response but it’s just as important to know when it’s okay to interact in a more human, relaxed way.

People want to feel like they are interacting with a real person. I’m sure everyone following Carney’s news feed feels like they know him a bit better, even when he was masquerading as Bieber, and if you manage to convey this type of messaging for your brand, it will go a long way to help building some brand love amongst your following.

Use humour.

Don’t be afraid to use humour in your messaging if the situation or your branding allows it. A serious customer service issue would not be the place for this method but as Carney saw, treating his crisis with light humour, worked pretty well for him. You also saw this with the recent Burger King hack on their Twitter account. Once they had regained control, instead of releasing a very serious statement, they made it light-hearted and recognised that they had picked up a lot of new followers.

 

Screen shot 2013-02-26 at 14.28.37

 

 

 

 

Carney, Burger King and Jeep have all have seen this positive side of their recent social media crises as they’ve added some hefty numbers to their Twitter follower count. It goes to show that if dealt with in the right way, a negative can be turned into a positive. If they keep the right mix of entertainment, value and transparency and let their ‘brands’ personality shine through, they may just keep all their new followers happy.

Keep this mix in your social feeds and you’ll start to reap the benefits too!

Have YOU heard it on the grape…Vine?

 

Vine –- The new kid on the block. We all like new toys to play with but does this one add value to a brand’s marketing efforts? We take a look…

 

What is Vine?

Vine is a new app launched by Twitter. According to them, it “lets you create and share beautiful, short looping videos” that will play directly in your Twitter or Vine news feed (Vines uploaded to Facebook will play in another window). These videos are limited to six second loops but you can stop and start the recording at will, so you can shoot in tiny sections like a flick book if you wish and videos are shareable if uploaded to a social network.

Can we really create good video content in six seconds?

Urban Outfitters shared a simple video that will appeal to one of their core demographics.

 

Bacardi UK have been demoing cocktails made with their drink, and inviting further engagement by asking followers what they’d like to see next.

 

Everyone had the same reservations about Twitter, how could we possibly say what we needed in 140 characters or less? We soon saw that the real beauty of Twitter was exactly that limitation — it forced you to creative and concise.
Brevity is particularly important online as a readers attention span is short. So when it comes to Vine, six seconds is pretty perfect for someone whizzing through their Twitter feed and this means that the right content could be incredibly shareable.

How can brands can use it?

  • Behind-the-scenes clips — share a snapshot of a day in the life of your brand or the history behind your brand
  • Demo your products in six seconds!
  • Show sneak peeks of upcoming products, announcements or new advertisements
  • Create a Vine competition where your fans submit the content to Twitter using a specific hashtag
  • Let your staff get creative! See what content they can come up with that might be interesting to your fans and customers. Maybe they can answer common questions or share tips?
  • Endorsements! Film your happy customers recommending your brand! (With their permission of course) Or ask them to submit Vines to you, for you to share.

If you decide to use Vine as a content creator for your brand, above all, remember that Vine is like any other medium you would use to create content. Make sure your videos are creative, shareable and relevant to your audience, and continue to test what works best for your community. Your content should still be high quality, even if it’s in six-second snapshots.

The Rules

  • Make your Vine visually exciting and creative
  • Ensure the message is on-brand
  • Ensure it has a message! Whether that’s promoting office culture, or showcasing a new product – it should have value for the both the brand and the viewer
  • Include tags/hashtags to make your content searchable
  • Share on other social platforms to ensure maximum visibility

Still need some inspiration? Check how other brands are already using it — http://brandsonvine.com/

Interest Targeting Is the Next Step for Brands Advertising on Twitter

By: Asma Stephan

Twitter has expanded their ad program with the use of interest targeting. While Promoted Tweets and Promoted Accounts give brands some ability to target users, the potential reach of these campaigns was limited to Tweeters who shared interests with current followers.

According to today’s announcement on the Twitter blog, interest targeting will not only help brands broaden their reach, but also more precisely target their audience.

For a broad reach, brands can target users using a comprehensive list of over 350 different interest categories, such as Home and Garden, or Style and Fashion or Hobbies and Interests.

This puts Twitter’s ad campaigns in a better position to compete with Facebook’s targeted ad offering, which features a similar checklist of categories. Brands who’ve seen success targeting niche audiences on Facebook would do well to incorporate interest targeting on Twitter.

Alternatively, brands can target a custom segment of specific Tweeters and any followers with shared interests. They can specify any relevant Twitter handles associated with the product, event, or initiative the brand is interested in promoting in order to reach a tight-knit network of Twitter users.

Targeting a set of users this way offers an especially provocative possibility: allowing brands the ability target their competition’s followers.

Though Twitter hasn’t released any hard data about the success of interest targeting, they report promising results, saying:

“[Beta advertisers] have seen significantly increased audience reach; others have creatively defined custom audiences to reach a very specific set of users. Across the board, they are seeing high engagement rates because they are reaching users who are interested in their content.”

Precisely reaching an audience with highly customized, highly targeted promotions is the holy grail of social media marketing. Twitter’s latest offering could prove to be a huge step in the right direction for brands.

What is your take on Twitter’s interest targeting? Do you already use Promoted Tweets and Promoted Accounts? Does this launch make you more likely to create a Twitter marketing campaign? Tell us in the comments below!