Posts tagged "RTMFP"

Adobe’s RTMFP Profile for Flash Communication Released

Adobe’s Secure Real-Time Media Flow Protocol (RTMFP) is a general purpose data transport protocol designed for real-time and peer-to-peer (P2P) communication, and is the foundation of Flash’s P2P capabilities. RTMFP is documented in RFC 7016  published November 2013 by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

We have now submitted a companion specification, “Adobe’s RTMFP Profile for Flash Communication” to the IETF Internet-Drafts repository.

This new specification shows how developers can create applications that interoperate with Adobe Flash and Adobe Media Server in client-server and direct client-to-client modes using RTMFP. We believe RTMFP also has applicability beyond Flash, and this specification can help developers understand how to use RTMFP in their own innovations for next-generation real-time and P2P applications.

Adobe continues to develop technologies using RTMFP within Adobe Flash and Adobe Media Server including features like Multicast and Groups, being used today by our customers to deliver high quality video experiences across public and corporate networks.

We are excited to continue making contributions to standards organizations such as the IETF that further Internet technologies for developers and users. As a technology leader, Adobe collaborates with stakeholders from industry, academia and government to develop, drive and support standards in existing and emerging technologies, policy areas, and markets, in order to improve our customers’ experience.

We welcome comments and feedback to help us improve the quality, clarity, and accuracy of this specification and we are excited to see what the Internet community creates with it.

Michael Thornburgh
Senior Computer Scientist

Canvas 2D and Real-Time Media Flow Protocol (RTMFP) Standards Contributions

In the last several weeks, Adobe has made two significant announcements about standards contributions. One announcement signaled the submission of a specification for Adobe’s Secure Real-Time Media Flow Protocol (RTMFP) to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and the other was an announcement by the W3C of stable and feature-complete HTML5 and Canvas 2D specifications to which Adobe contributed an endorsement (as well as providing Rik Cabanier as a co-editor of the Canvas 2D spec).

The two announcements are joined by a common thread: In both cases, Adobe felt that the market and our customers would benefit from the technology in the specifications. In the case of RTMFP, Adobe made a direct contribution of technology, which we believe has value for developers as the Internet continues to develop new applications and solutions. RTMFP may help solve some of the more vexing problems in real-time and peer-to-peer communications. It was submitted under a royalty-free grant – meaning that Adobe does not stand to profit from the contribution.

In the case of HTML5 and Canvas 2D, Adobe made a significant royalty-free grant of technology to the HTML5 specification as well as associated specifications that comprised “big HTML5” (which includes all the elements associated with HTML5 , from JavaScript to CSS). Along with that, Adobe (in conjunction with Microsoft and Google) is a major contributor to the W3C editor’s fund, which provides the means necessary to hire full time W3C editors for the HTML5.1 specification. We’re not sure how the next revision of HTML5 will shake out, but we’re reasonably certain that the careful and planned releases of stable and testable technology will help the market (including our customers) achieve fuller benefits from the World Wide Web.

In both cases, Adobe is betting on the future. The technologies being offered are either proven and existing technologies (Adobe uses RTMFP in Flash and other products), and Canvas 2D is increasingly being deployed and being embraced by the market. What is different is that businesses and developers now have an available and stable specification for implementation and planning. We don’t know where the market will go – but we do know that providing a firm foundation for continued expansion makes it much easier to build for the future.

We’re also willing to bet that the increased transparency offered by standards will help make the Internet and the Web more useful and increase the numbers of users and developers. And that they, in turn, will see more and more opportunities for further development and use. And this grows the market and increases the utility of the Web for everyone.

Carl Cargill
Principal Scientist

Adobe’s Secure Real-Time Media Flow Protocol

Today Michael Thornburgh, Sr. Computer Scientist at Adobe, submitted a specification for Adobe’s Secure Real-Time Media Flow Protocol (RTMFP) to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet-Drafts repository  along with a disclosure of and grant of essential intellectual property rights under royalty-free terms.

RTMFP is a low-level endpoint-to-endpoint data transport protocol designed for real-time and peer-to-peer (P2P) communication. It presents a unified and holistic solution to a number of Internet communication problems, including security, NAT traversal, congestion control and prioritization of parallel media and data flows, variable transmission reliability for messages, and IP address mobility.

RTMFP is the foundation protocol that we use to bring the P2P and Multicast capabilities to Adobe products such as Adobe Flash and Adobe Media Server, but we believe it has applicability beyond Flash that the Internet community can use in their own innovations for next-generation real-time and P2P applications. Adobe continues to develop technologies using RTMFP within Adobe Flash and Adobe Media Server including features like Multicast and Groups, being used today by our customers to deliver high quality video experiences across public and corporate networks.

We are excited to continue making contributions to standards organizations such as the IETF that further Internet technologies for developers and users. As a technology leader, Adobe collaborates with stakeholders from industry, academia and government to develop, drive and support standards in existing and emerging technologies, policy areas, and markets, in order to improve our customers’ experience.

We welcome comments and feedback to help us improve the quality, clarity, and accuracy of this specification and we are excited to see what the Internet community creates with it.

Kevin Towes
Sr. Product Manager

(reposted from: Kevin Towes on Online Video at Adobe blog)