Posts tagged "experience design"

Recording available of “Intuitive Experiences with Flex and SAP”

Earlier this month, Matthias Zeller and I presented on “Intuitive Experiences with Flex and SAP”, at SAP’s community event in Palo Alto. The presentation was recorded, and is now available here (we start presenting 24 minutes in to the presentation).

In this presentation, we showcase Project Hendrix at Adobe, we talk about the importance of Design in technology, we talk about how to build Flex experiences upon SAP implementations, and we introduce the idea of Experience Oriented Architecture.

I’d love to hear what you think.

Can Business Analysts become User Experience Designers ? Forrester thinks so…

I met with Mike Gualtieri of Forrester earlier in the year, at the Adobe Industry Analyst Summit, and very much enjoyed discussion around the role of user-experience designers in creating user-centric solutions in the new enterprise. I note that Mike has just delivered a Forrester Whitepaper, titled “Business Analysts: Seize The Opportunity To Deliver Compelling User Experiences”.

The abstract for the paper follows, and if I were to just read the abstract I think I’d take an opposing position to Mike in the paper:

“Is anything more important than how users experience your Web sites and software applications? If your customers can’t effectively and efficiently meet their goals by using your sites and apps, they will go elsewhere, leading to lost revenue and increased expense. If employees find sites or apps too hard to use, they become frustrated and less productive. To maximize productivity, smart organizations place a strong focus on user experience (UX) as part of the software development process, but not every firm has people with the right skills and focus on this important discipline. This is a great opportunity for business analysts, but it requires a shift in the way they define requirements. UX skills are often absent from business analysts’ (BAs’) tool kits, because BAs have been trained to engage “the business” to learn about requirements but not to do true user research that will deepen their understanding. By gaining key skills, performing user research, and actually “becoming” their application’s end users while defining requirements, BAs can improve the user experience — and organizational outcomes — by helping create apps that are useful, usable, and desirable.”

I look forward to reading the paper in further detail, but here’s my concern….I’m often asked, “how do we train our technical team to do the design work” or “how do we teach our business analysts to do the design work” and my answer is always an initially flippant but somewhat heartfelt, “4 years of Design School”.

You see, Design is a profession…and I think we have to be incredibly careful in removing Designers from the Design process. At surface level, there are techniques employed by designers that unravel and reveal the insights that will inform a subsequent design…user interviews, creating user personas, ethnographic research techniques that allow observation of end-users engaging in existing processes with existing tools, are all means by which an experience designer can try and find the “soul of the solution”, the key insight or insights upon which an improved design might emerge.

I struggle initially with the idea that by taking these techniques away from designers, giving them to business analysts so that the analysts write better requirements (through the lens of the user), that a better user-experience will emerge by giving these requirements (now informed by a user) to a designer to create a new user-experience.

For the methods exist to create the opportunity for observations and insights; there is questionable value in the persona as a deliverable, as much as there is value in observing and generalizing user behavior according to tasks and goals, for instance.

I look forward to reading Mike’s paper in full, to better understand the research…however, my own thinking would be that rather than “make designers of analysts” we recognize that before we specify how to “build things right”, we must employ designers and their design-thinking to ensure we are even “building the right thing”. And once we have reframed the problem we are solving through the lens of the end-user, I would hope that we can find ways by which requirements are informed by designers, and designers are informed by requirements, through process and approach that brings the requirements gathering process and the design process together.

That’s the 3D methodology we employ within our Adobe Technical Services Organization, a means by which we partition the process of Discovery from the process of Design, and setup the appropriate handshakes rather than handovers between the different skills in these cross-functional teams.

Are there other industries that you know of where we take the Design process from designers, and give it to those who specify the features and functions of a product or service ?

Recording of “The Value of Creating Intuitive User Experiences”

A recording is now available of the presentation Ron Rogowski and I presented for the Adobe Webinar “The Value of Creating Intuitive User Experiences”.

As part of this presentation, I demonstrated “Project Hendrix”, an application that my team has been delivering internally within Adobe to allow our support staff to help more customers, first time, in less time, every time. The application is a Flex experience delivered upon a complex enterprise architecture, most notably SAP CRM, and leveraged our user-centric 3D Methodology to discover the insights, to inform the design and requirements of the application that was ultimately delivered.

Enjoy the recording here.