Posts in Category "New"

October 9, 2013

From Broadsides to Websites: Miguel Sousa brings wood type to digital life with HWT Gothic Round

gothicround1

Last week, we talked about the adventures of Adobe type designer Miguel Sousa as he traveled the US conducting research on his sabbatical project, a revival of a historic wood typeface. He carefully paged through gorgeously produced antique specimen books and studied the shopworn surfaces of giant wooden letters stained with the ghosts of ink from bygone eras. Miguel printed with rare alphabets hewn from nineteenth-century timber, fueling his imagination as he worked to craft a typeface that would smoothly meld historical charm with advanced typographic technology.

The result of Miguel’s summer sabbatical journey—along with many months spent on research and type design and production in San Jose—is the finishing of a face that captured his heart, released this week as HWT Gothic Round. Continue reading…

8:55 AM Permalink
September 30, 2013

Adobe fonts for Indian languages

It is with great personal pride and relish that I announce the release of two new Adobe font families for Indian languages. Adobe Tamil and Adobe Gujarati were both released over the weekend, bringing the number of Indian writing systems supported by the Adobe Type Library to a total of four. Each of these families consists of two styles: a regular and a bold. The designs have been completed with print work in mind, as traditional publishing is still very much a vibrant industry within India. These new type families follow the release of two other Adobe type families for Indian languages, Adobe Devanagari and Adobe Gurmukhi, which have already been available for some time. All of these families are currently available for purchase in the Adobe Type Store.

Adobe Devanagari typeface sample

Continue reading…

9:30 AM Permalink
April 3, 2013

Adobe Blank Redux

As discussed in our March 28, 2013 article, Adobe Blank was recently released as a open source special-purpose OpenType font that helps to solve the FOUT (Flash Of Unstyled Text) problem.

The version that was initially released was approximately 80K in size, and included 257 glyphs, 256 of which were functional in the sense that they are mapped from 1,111,998 Unicode code points, though they are intentionally non-spacing and non-marking. I further analyzed the tables, and found a way to trim the size further by increasing the number of glyphs to 2,049, 2,048 of which are functional. The size is now a more modest 32K.
Continue reading…

2:44 PM Permalink
March 28, 2013

Introducing Adobe Blank

Earlier this year, the Adobe Type Team was approached by one of our other development teams to produce a special-purpose font with two fascinating—at least to me—characteristics:

  • All Unicode code points are covered.
  • All code points are rendered using a non-spacing and non-marking glyph.

I decided to take on this task, because I immediately recognized that the special-purpose Adobe-Identity-0 ROS was the appropriate vehicle for developing such a font.

The font itself was developed early this year, and I finally got around to releasing it on Open@Adobe as a new open-source project named Adobe Blank OpenType Font. I will soon mirror it on GitHub for those who prefer to get their open-source material from there.
Continue reading…

4:08 PM Permalink
August 2, 2012

Source Sans Pro: Adobe’s first open source type family

Source Sans Pro title image

Adobe’s legacy in type technology

Adobe has come a long way since its early days in which the specification for the PostScript Type 1 font format was a closely-guarded trade secret leading up to the “font wars.” Since this specification was begrudgingly published in 1990, Adobe has been more proactive in publicly releasing tools for developing and producing high-quality type. Subsequently, Adobe collaborated with Microsoft on the OpenType standard, which was later made an open standard for type technology as the Open Font Format: a free, publicly available standard (ISO/IEC 14496-22:2009). In connection with this, Adobe has shared its tool set for building OpenType fonts as the Adobe Font Development Kit for OpenType (AFDKO). Although these tools are not open source, they can be used freely and have been downloaded by thousands of users. Additionally, tools such as FontLab Studio and FontMaster make use of AFDKO code for building fonts. I believe that the world of type design and typography has benefited greatly from Adobe’s contributions in the arena of type technology. In adding to this legacy, I am proud to announce that today marks another milestone as Adobe makes yet another type resource freely available by releasing the Source Sans Pro family as our first-ever open source type family.

Continue reading…

6:50 AM Permalink

New Adobe Originals & more Adobe Web Fonts

It’s an exciting day for Adobe Type! Today, we’re releasing two new Adobe Original families for both print and web, Source™ Sans Pro and Leander Script™ Pro. Plus, we have a new set of web fonts available from our partners at Typekit and WebINK.
Continue reading…

6:45 AM Permalink
May 7, 2012

Useful Details About Creative Suite 6 (CS6) Fonts

I know some of you are wondering what’s up with fonts for CS6. The font set shipping with CS6 closely resembles the set that shipped with CS5. However, the following new families will ship with CS6.

• Adobe Devanagari (4 fonts)
• Adobe Naskh (1 font)
• Myriad Arabic (4 fonts)
• Myriad Hebrew (4 fonts)

Continue reading…

10:12 AM Permalink
November 3, 2011

What’s in a name?

The Adobe Type team has been wrestling a bit with Shakespeare’s timeless question as we wrap up some newly-enhanced typeface families here.

Continue reading…

4:55 PM Permalink
May 20, 2011

New Adobe Fonts Now Available

I’m happy to announce the availability of three new Adobe typeface families and one new Japanese font package on our Type Showroom.

Adobe Text first became available in May 2010 as a registration incentive for CS5 and was included in the first wave of Adobe Web Fonts. Designed by Robert Slimbach, this text typeface is classified as a Transitional design (between calligraphic Renaissance and high-contrast Modern styles), with distinctive, contemporary touches.  Continue reading…

7:35 AM Permalink
May 4, 2011

The Adobe Type Team is pleased to welcome a new addition to the Adobe Originals…

Adobe Originals M&M'S

…sort of. ☺

Continue reading…

9:02 AM Permalink