Posts tagged "Paul Hunt"

January 14, 2014

The Source Project and Open Source Collaboration: A work in progress

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Source*

Adobe Type team members Miguel Sousa and Paul Hunt discuss their adventures in open source font development.
Photo by David Sudweeks, TypeCon2013, Portland, Oregon.

In August 2012, Adobe released its first open source typeface family, Source Sans Pro. We followed up a month later with its monospaced companion, Source Code Pro. The response was overwhelmingly positive, and elicited a terrific amount of feedback from the open source community and the type and design world. Paul D. Hunt, principal designer/developer for the Source Sans and Code types, and Miguel Sousa, a significant contributor to the project, spoke at TypeCon2013 in Portland last August about their experiences with the project. Below is some of what Paul and Miguel presented to this annual gathering of type makers and type users.

The Source project has been an interesting one for the Adobe Type team. Not only was Source Sans our first open source typeface, it has also led to us changing our development process and tools. But one of the most important aspects of the Source project was that it gave us a unique opportunity to engage with the type and open source communities.

One of the most crucial pieces of feedback we received from the open source community after releasing Source Sans on SourceForge was that the project should also live on GitHub. (GitHub is extremely collaboration-friendly and boasts the world’s largest open source community.)

The gentle prodding went a little something like this:

weusegit2 Continue reading…

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November 20, 2013

From Slavophile to Typophile: The cultural journeys of Paul D. Hunt

Paul and big P
Paul D. Hunt joined Adobe as a typeface designer in 2009, but his path to San Jose has been anything but typical. Valedictorian of his high school graduating class of 25 (just down the road from a famous Route 66 landmark), Paul was well on his way to a high-powered career in international business. But he fell in love with language, then type, somewhere along the way. And the rest, as they say, is history.

How did you make your debut on Planet Earth? 

I was born in Winslow, Arizona (from the popular Eagles’ song). I wasn’t born on the corner, though—I was born in the hospital! I grew up in a rural town called Joseph City and went to public school there. With just 1,200 people in the town, there weren’t many opportunities to do much of anything interesting, but when there were, I tried to maximize them. For example, when our school briefly offered some satellite courses through UW in foreign languages, I took that opportunity to start to learn Russian.

Aside from the incredibly easy task of learning Russian, what else did you do for fun growing up? 

I was involved in dancing, in the form of clogging. My younger sister and I did it for many years throughout my youth. I worked at the school auditorium doing light and sound and stagehand stuff. I was in choir, and I did a little bit of acting in community productions. Our show choir did Oliver! and I played the villain, Bill Sykes, when I was a senior (probably because I was the only one who could grow a beard and pull the whole thing off).

In 1995 as Dickensian villain Bill Sykes in his high school’s presentation of Oliver!

So how did you transition from aspiring clog dancer and super-villain to type designer?

I was always interested in language and culture—and later, design—and how these things all come together. I wanted to continue with dance and studying Russian—part of the reason that I chose to attend Brigham Young University was because they have very good language programs and an international folk dance ensemble. In the summer of 2000, I was part of a team that toured around elementary schools in Utah doing all kinds of dance—Ukrainian, Hungarian, Polish, French Canadian, Israeli, Bulgarian—a lot of Eastern European stuff, which is what I like most. Bulgarian rhythms, costumes, and music always make me excited. That’s my favorite, just because it’s so energetic and completely different from [what people usually] think of European folk dancing. Continue reading…

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October 15, 2013

Lasting Impressions: Adobe gives away Hamilton keepsakes at AIGA

hwt-cards-all

Everyone can do simple things to make a difference, and every little bit really does count.”

—Stella McCartney

In late August, Adobe Type team members Miguel Sousa and Nicole Miñoza met up with Richard Kegler and Carima El-Behairy of P22 type foundry during TypeCon2013 in Portland to discuss the release of HWT Gothic Round. Their mission was twofold: they wanted to do something special to showcase the nearly-lost antique typefaces Miguel and his colleagues Frank Griesshammer and Paul Hunt were digitizing for the Hamilton Wood Type Foundry. Steadfast supporters of the Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum, they were determined to increase awareness about the HWT revivals project and its venerable namesake institution.

The quartet knew that, once introduced to the typographic riches housed within the museum, the greater creative community would fall in love with the Hamilton just as they had. Abiding by the mantra that the simple things are often the best things, they came up with a quiet way of spreading the word that would speak volumes.

They settled on the concept of producing a letterpress note card—blank on the inside, with beautiful typography on the front and just a small line of text on the back that would mention the revivals project and point readers to the website to learn more about HWT and the Hamilton Museum. Based on their happy experience at TypeCon, the convivial group figured there could be no better audience for a typographic keepsake than the creatives who would flock in droves to the next big design event in the US: the biennial AIGA conference (held last week in Minneapolis).

With time tight, the production immediately kicked into high gear, and when Nicole saw their vision realized a few weeks later, she was thrilled with the results. The charming cards were designed by Rich Kegler to match the conference theme—HEAD, HEART, HAND—and printed by Jen Farrell of Chicago’s Starshaped Press. Jen also wrote a terrific article unveiling the process of printing the keepsakes.

As Adobe was a presenting sponsor of HHH13 (the event’s Twitter hashtag), there were plenty of HWT cards on hand to distribute at our booth. To no one’s surprise, attendees loved the cards—especially the lucky ones who got inky at the letterpress workshop led by the Hamilton’s fabulous Moran Brothers and hosted by Studio on Fire in Minneapolis.

And now, for a close-up of the lovingly letterpressed keepsakes:  Continue reading…

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