#CreateNow World Tour: UK Highlights

ukadobe

December 09, 2013

One Comment

Since mid-September, Adobe’s #CreateNow world tour has brought creative experts and Adobe’s own evangelists to cities across the globe. We’ve been celebrating all things Creative Cloud by giving all of you the lowdown on the very latest updates to our creative offering.

On 26th and 28th November we came to the UK, stopping off in Bristol and Edinburgh. With new features and applications being continually updated in Creative Cloud, the #CreateNow events have been a great chance for the pros and I to show everyone just what exciting and dynamic content can be created using the new suite of tools.

_MG_7863

A number of deep dive sessions took place at both events, with specialist knowledge on everything from digital imaging to video editing being shared.

Richard Curtis kicked off proceedings with two photography based sessions exploring Lightroom 5 and Photoshop CC, walking through the workflows for designers and publishers and telling everyone how photographers can reimagine their content and share it with the rest of the world via Behance.

tweet 1

Iona Walters showcased Adobe Muse, the software which makes it possible for designers to create web pages without having to code, as well as highlighting how the Edge suite of tools and services can save web designers hours of time thanks to handy features like responsive design.

tweet 2

Niels Stephens was up next, focusing on all things video-related. He showcased some of the latest updates to Adobe’s CC video applications, inclu ding the seamless collaboration between Audition and Premier Pro as well as running through performance enhancements to After Effects CC.

tweet 3

Finally, Rupert Knowles spoke about the huge shift towards digital publishing and demonstrated just how simple and seamless digit al publishing can be with the Digital Publishing Suite, with some great examples of tablet publications from Adidas and TopGear, which were honed using InDesign CC.

_MG_8168

On the day, attendees were encouraged to live tweet throughout the event as well as have a go on our very own interactive graffiti wall, with some great feedback:

tweet 4

tweet 5

tweet 7

I think the #CreateNow tour has been so successful as we’ve tailored the day to suit what our audience want to know and hear. The #CreateNow sessions focused on the workflows that creatives deal with on a day to day basis as well as exploring how to get the best from Creative Cloud. By listening to feedback and interacting with our customers, we are enabling people to enhance their creative processes.

If #CreateNow has inspired you, find out more about becoming a member of the Creative Cloud and the tools that are available to you as part of our creative community here.

If you want to see more images from the Adobe #CreateNow events, then head over to our Creative Juices Facebook page. Follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page to stay tuned on future events.

John Cole, Adobe Digital Media Manager for Northern Europe

Adobe Generation is bigger and better than ever

ukadobe

December 04, 2013

One Comment

We are thrilled to note that this year’s Adobe Generation is bigger and better than ever before. Adobe Generation kicked off on the 19th of November with the Photo Imaging course. The first Photo Imaging session saw a record number of attendee’s and was the largest live class Adobe has ever held in any part of the world. Moreover, the attendee’s for the Photo Imaging class were not just UK based. With increased global applicants, in particular, Poland, USA and South Africa, our aim to reach and inspire people globally really is a reality. Currently 50% of the Photo Imaging course attendee’s are students. This further confirms Adobe Generation to have sparked interest for a wider demographic- students are not the only ones who want to hone their Creative Cloud skills.

Adobe Generation

Like all of the five free online Adobe Generation courses, the Photo Imaging course takes place every Tuesday over Adobe Connect, for a total of five weeks; that is five free online sessions! One student noted that “week 1 class crammed full of useful info, tutors really know their stuff & great participation from students” (Pip Pickering). The Photo Imaging seminars from professionals, Ian Usher and Ross Wallis are proving to be really popular. Why wouldn’t you want to take part? You are not too late to join in on the Photo Imaging action: register here, to access and attend the live seminars.

Adobe Generation- register now:

-          Photo Imaging- every Tuesday from 19th November- 17th December 7-8.30pm

-          Animation- every Tuesday from 7th January- 11th February 7-8.30pm

-          Video- every Tuesday from 25th February- 1st April 7-8.30pm

-          Games Design- every Tuesday from 29th April- 3rd June 7-8.30pm

-          App Design- every Tuesday from 10th June- 15th July 7-8.30pm

A-Level results; the National Student Survey; what does it mean for higher education?

ukadobe

August 15, 2013

No Comments yet

Mark A’Bear, UK Education Manager discusses the need for institutions to provide good value for money on the back of this week’s A-Level results and National Student Survey

Today thousands of students across the UK receive their A- Level results, with a record numbers going through the clearing process to get their place at university.

However, while Universities may have filled places for the next academic year, the hard work has only just begun. With students now paying up to £9,000 a year in tuition fees, their expectations are understandably higher, so retaining students is now just as important as attracting them in the first place.

Interestingly, the National Student Survey results were also out this week, which showed that whilst universities are moving in the right direction, more needs to be done to ensure that students are getting value for money.  Our own Digital Campus 2013 data echoed this sentiment, as it revealed that for 55% of the 2012/13 student intake, university didn’t live up to their expectations, with a lack of suitable libraries and technology named the main reasons why. It also showed a worrying gap between the ICT provision students expected to have before they started their course, and what they actually got. 82% expected their university to go above and beyond a basic technology provision (internet, email and basic programmes) – but only half actually got that.

Students also had concerns over how employable they will be when they graduate, with a  third (33%) admitting they don’t feel their university is equipped to help them get a job and almost a half (49%) saying they didn’t think their chosen institution had good enough links with business. This comes at a time when 96% of students identified ‘increasing their chances of employment’ as the number one reason behind their decision to go to university in the first place.

It’s worrying that there are still many students who only have access to basic tools and technology and aren’t confident that the money they are spending on their education will result in a job. I’m therefore calling on institutions currently going through the clearing process to use this as a wake-up call and provide students with the digital tools needed to help them succeed in today’s tech-driven workplace – or risk leaving them sorely disappointed.

At Adobe we are supporting institutions in providing their students with the latest industry standard technology to help meet their increasing digital demands. We now provide nearly 50% of all Universities and FE Colleges with site-wide access to the latest industry standard creative tools that help students increase their employability. The three year Eduserv Adobe ELA Framework Agreement extends student access to Adobe technology across the entire campus, as well as on staff computers and we estimate that 1.5 million UK students, will have access to Adobe’s industry standard creative tools from September.

Digital Campus 2013 Report: Universities falling short of student expectations

The @AdobeUK Team

May 16, 2013

No Comments yet

Hot off the press! We’ve just released our Digital Campus 2013 report, which reveals that universities still have a way to go in making students feel they are getting value for money following the tuition fees rise.

Specifically, students from this year’s intake are pinpointing the provision of suitable libraries and technology as the main areas needing improvement, with two-thirds (63%) saying they expected to have access to more support facilities and services than they are actually getting.

Despite the fact that 96% of students said the number one reason they chose to go to university was to increase their chances of getting a job when they graduate, only a third (33%) think their university will help them do this now.

As a result, we are calling on Vice Chancellors to review their ICT strategies to help live up to their student’s digital demands.  Click on the infographic below to view all the key findings in detail:

For more information on how Adobe can help institutions live up to student demands visit www.adobe.com/uk/education.

Adobe Education Digital Campus Infographic blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Response to plans for an English baccalaureate system

The @AdobeUK Team

November 19, 2012

No Comments yet

The arts are key to creativity in learning, so plans for an English baccalaureate system for UK schools that omit arts subjects is worrying, particularly in light of our own research which shows that 77%* of UK employers and University lecturers place high value on creativity in school leavers.

78%** of people in the UK agree that creativity is key to driving economic growth. And although 61%** feel that creativity is ‘stifled’ by the current education system, they do agree that more needs to be done to foster it. My fear for an education system devoid of any arts tuition, is that creativity will be stifled even further.

The key will be technology, which when used effectively, will need to play an increasingly central role in helping schools to drive creativity and support arts subjects. We work with schools, such as Chalfonts Community College, who have created Digital Art courses that blend virtual and reusable learning resources. This involved rewriting the traditional art specification to include digital media – from digital imaging, film, animation, graphics and game making – to help students learn creative skills which influence their approach across the curriculum.
The UK is renowned for its creativity thanks to its successes in fashion, art, design, film, food and music, so creative schooling is incredibly important. We have the best creative higher education system of any country in the world, but cutting arts from secondary education I fear will create a skills gap between school and higher education or the workplace in years to come.”

Liz Wilkins, Senior Leader, Adobe Education UK 

*Taken from Adobe’s ‘Creativity in the Classroom’ report, 2010
**Taken from Adobe’s ‘State of Create’ report, 2012

Recently Approved