Today’s OFT Announcement Marks A Step In The Right Direction

ukadobe

October 22, 2013

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Mark A’Bear, Education Manager at Adobe UK responds to the news that the Office of Fair Trading plans to investigate students’ consumer rights and university competition.

“I welcome today’s news that the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) plans to investigate the value for money that students are getting in light of the radical changes that are taking place within the Higher Education sector.

The hike in tuition fees was inevitably going to mean that the student experience would change. It has never been more important for graduates to have real world skills – real world skills that employers are increasingly expecting their new recruits to have. But students need the support of their Universities to provide access to the tools and facilities that will help them develop these skills in the first place.

Naturally, students are questioning the value for money they get from their University and feel entitled to a better quality degree for the extra money they are paying. Our own Digital Campus research earlier this year – which surveyed the 2012/13 intake of undergraduates, the first to pay the higher fees – revealed that universities still have a way to go in achieving this.

55% of the students we spoke to admit their university is not living up to their expectations, specifically pinpointing the lack of suitable facilities such as libraries, and technology provision as the main areas needing improvement. As many as half only have access to basic tools such as internet, email and basic programmes, falling short of the 82% who expect their university to go above and beyond a basic technology provision before they started their course.

University Vice Chancellors must step up to the challenge, and quickly, to meet the demands of the next generation of student. Needless to say, those able to adapt their strategies will be far more appealing to students looking for reassurances that they’ll have more than just debt to show for their University careers.”

Mark A’Bear, Education Manager at Adobe UK

Your chance to earn an Adobe Education Trainer credential this summer

ukadobe

July 18, 2013

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If you’ve got experience teaching digital media to your students using Adobe tools such as Photoshop, and you’re keen to impart your knowledge and train your colleagues to do the same, then listen up. Because we’re giving you the opportunity to participate in our free Train the Trainer online course and to earn an Adobe Education Trainer credential this summer.

This free online course launches on 21st July 2013 on the Adobe Education Exchange and runs over ten weeks until 15 September 2013 – at the end of which you’ll be qualified to train your fellow teachers or lecturers on the best way to use Adobe’s creative tools in their own lessons.

Anyone who successfully completes the course requirements will not only earn a digital Adobe Education Trainer credential, you’ll also get to enjoy a tonne of other benefits;

  •  Access to an exclusive Adobe Professional Development Toolkit that can be used to design and deliver customised training to schools, colleges and universities around the world
  • An invitation to join an exclusive professional learning community of Adobe Education Trainers worldwide
  • Inclusion of your name and contact information in an online global database of Adobe Education Trainers
  • An invitation to participate in further training-for-trainers and professional learning activities designed specifically for Adobe Education Trainers
  • Use of an “Adobe Education Trainer” digital credential to market your services

The Adobe Train the Trainer course takes place from July 21st – 15th September 2013. To get started, click here to register and enroll.

Adobe’s response to new vocational courses

ukadobe

July 05, 2013

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Mark A’Bear, UK Education Manager, Adobe UK responds to the news that the Government plans to introduce a raft of new vocational courses from 2016:

“Yesterday’s announcement by the education secretary is a positive step forward that will support young people in developing real-world skills they will later need in the workplace. The question I would raise, is whether these mooted vocational courses extend to design and creative subjects, such as gaming and web development.

Education changes lives, and providing students with vocational skills that are valued by those in industry enables both businesses and young people to fulfil their potential. Historically, education has been far too focussed on raw academic qualifications. Education shouldn’t be about being able to tick a certain box – it should instead be about the underlying skills that having a certain qualification demonstrates.

Should today’s proposals omit design and the wider creative arts, it would be an opportunity missed and could threaten the future success of the UK’s creative industries, which currently constitute one of the fastest-growing sectors in the country. The UK is renowned for its creativity thanks to its successes in fashion, art, design, film, food and music, and as such, it is imperative that we ensure creativity and design are an integral part of these planned vocational qualifications.”

At Adobe, we’ve been doing our bit to support vocational learning, most recently by offering young people the opportunity to gain practical technology and creativity skills, as well as learn about the world of gaming and design, through our Adobe Generation online courses. In addition, we have been extending student access to Adobe technology and helping institutions meet students’ increasing demand for access to the latest technology, through the Eduserv Adobe ELA Framework Agreement. This three year license agreement will enable Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) institutions to deploy the latest version of Adobe’s Creative Suite across the entire campus, as well as on staff computers, for the first time.

Response to plans for an English baccalaureate system

The @AdobeUK Team

November 19, 2012

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The arts are key to creativity in learning, so plans for an English baccalaureate system for UK schools that omit arts subjects is worrying, particularly in light of our own research which shows that 77%* of UK employers and University lecturers place high value on creativity in school leavers.

78%** of people in the UK agree that creativity is key to driving economic growth. And although 61%** feel that creativity is ‘stifled’ by the current education system, they do agree that more needs to be done to foster it. My fear for an education system devoid of any arts tuition, is that creativity will be stifled even further.

The key will be technology, which when used effectively, will need to play an increasingly central role in helping schools to drive creativity and support arts subjects. We work with schools, such as Chalfonts Community College, who have created Digital Art courses that blend virtual and reusable learning resources. This involved rewriting the traditional art specification to include digital media – from digital imaging, film, animation, graphics and game making – to help students learn creative skills which influence their approach across the curriculum.
The UK is renowned for its creativity thanks to its successes in fashion, art, design, film, food and music, so creative schooling is incredibly important. We have the best creative higher education system of any country in the world, but cutting arts from secondary education I fear will create a skills gap between school and higher education or the workplace in years to come.”

Liz Wilkins, Senior Leader, Adobe Education UK 

*Taken from Adobe’s ‘Creativity in the Classroom’ report, 2010
**Taken from Adobe’s ‘State of Create’ report, 2012

How to deploy Adobe Creative Suite 6 across your campus this Summer

The @AdobeUK Team

August 07, 2012

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If your University’s looking to deploy Adobe Creative Suite 6 (CS6) across campus this summer, then this one’s for you. We’ve created a bunch of resources to help ensure a smooth installation process using Adobe Application Manager Enterprise Edition (AAMEE).

In a nutshell, AAMEE is a straightforward and customisable way to wrap CS6 applications as MSI or PKG packages for silent deployment across your campus. It means you can automatically enter and validate volume serial numbers over the internet prior to installation, choose which applications are installed, disable automatic updates, and turn off manual registration.

Take a look at this onDemand eSeminar to find out more. You can also download free guides and toolkits by clicking here.

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