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Good-Looking Shapes Gallery

As a modern consumer of media, you rarely crack open a magazine or a pamphlet or anything that would be characterized as “printed”. Let me suggest that you take a walk on the wild side. The next time you are in a doctor’s office, or a supermarket checkout lane, or a library, thumb though a magazine. Most of the layouts you’ll find inside can also be found on the web, but not all of them. Layouts where content hugs the boundaries of illustrations are common in print and rare on the web. One of the reasons non-rectangular contour-hugging layouts are uncommon on the web is that they are difficult to produce.

They are not difficult to produce anymore.

The CSS Shapes specification is now in the final stages of standardization. This feature enables flowing content around geometric shapes (like circles and polygons), as well as around shapes defined by an image’s alpha channel. Shapes make it easy to produce the kinds of layouts you can find in print today, with all the added flexibility and power that modern online media affords. You can use CSS Shapes right now with the latest builds of WebKit and Blink based browsers, like Safari and Chrome.

Development of CSS Shapes has been underway for about two years, and we’ve been regularly heralding its progress here. Many of those reports have focused on the evolution of the spec and implementations, and they’ve included examples that emphasized basics over beauty. This article is an attempt to tilt the balance back towards good-looking. Listed below are simple shapes demos that we think look pretty good. Everyone on Adobe’s CSS Shapes engineering team contributed at least one.

There’s a live CodePen.io version of each demo in the gallery. Click on the demo screenshot or one of the handy links to take a look. You’ll want to view the demos with a browser that supports Shapes and you’ll need to enable CSS Shapes in that browser. For example you can use a nightly build of the Safari browser or you can enable shapes in Chrome or Chrome Canary like this:

  1. Copy and paste chrome://flags/#enable-experimental-web-platform-features into the address bar, then press enter.
  2. Click the ‘Enable’ link within that section.
  3. Click the ‘Relaunch Now’ button at the bottom of the browser window.

A few of the demos use the new Shapes Polyfill and will work in most browsers.

And now, without further ado, please have a look through our good-looking shapes gallery.


Ozma of Oz

ozma-demo-screenshot

This demo reproduces the layout style that opens many of the chapters of the L. Frank Baum books, including Ozma of Oz.  The first page is often dominated by an illustration on the left or right. The chapter’s text conforms to the illustration, but not too tightly. The books were published over 100 years ago and they still look good print.  With CSS Shapes they can still look good on the web.

Top Cap

topcap-demo-screenshot

The conventional “drop-cap” opens a paragraph by enlarging and highlighting the first letter, word or phrase. The drop-cap’s goal is to draw your attention to where you can start reading. This demo delivers the same effect by crowning the entire opening paragraph with a “top cap” that funnels your attention into the article. In both cases, what’s going on is a segue from a graphic element to the text.

Violator

monsters-demo-screenshot

A violator is small element that “violates” rectangular text layout by encroaching on a corner or a small part of an edge. This layout idiom is common in short-form magazines and product packaging. That “new and improved” banner which blazes through the corner of thousands of consumer products (whether or not they are new or improved) – it’s a violator.

Column Interest

columns-demo-screenshot

When a print magazine feels the need to incorporate some column layout melodrama, they often reach for this idiom. The shape spans a pair of columns, which creates visual interest in the middle of the page. Without it you’d be faced with a wall of attention sapping text and more than likely turn the page.

Caption

Screenshot of the wine jug caption demo.

The old-school approach for including a caption with an image is to put the caption text alongside or below the image. Putting a caption on top of an image requires a little more finesse, since you have to ensure that the text doesn’t obscure anything important and that the text is rendered in a way that preserves readability.  The result can be relatively attractive.

This photograph was taken by Zoltan Horvath who has pointed out that I’ve combined a quote about tea with a picture of a ceremonial wine jug.  I apologize for briefly breaching that beverage boundary. It’s just a demo.

Paging

Screenshot of the paging demo.

With a layout like this, one could simple let the content wrap and around the shape on the right and then expand into the usual rectangle.  In this demo the content is served up a paragraph at a time, in response to the left and right arrow keys.

Note also: yes in fact the mate gourd is perched on exactly the same windowsill as the previous demo. Zoltan and Pope Francis are among the many fans of yerba mate tea.

Ersatz shape-inside

Screenshot of the ersatz shape-inside demo.

Originally the CSS Shapes spec included shape-inside as well as shape-outside. Sadly, shape-inside was promoted to “Level 2″ of the spec and isn’t available in the current implementations. Fortunately for shape insiders everywhere, it’s still sometimes possible to mimic shape-inside with an adjacent pair of carefully designed shape-outside floats. This demo is a nice example of that, where the text appears inside a bowl of oatmeal.

Animation

animation-demo-screeenshot

This is an animated demo, so to appreciate it you’ll really need to take a look at the live version. It is an example of using an animated shape to draw the user’s attention to a particular message.  Of course one must use this approach with restraint, since an animated loop on a web page doesn’t just gently tug at the user’s attention. It drags at their attention like a tractor beam.

Performance

performance-demo-screenshot

Advertisements are intended to grab the user’s attention and a second or two of animation will do that. In this demo a series of transition motions have been strung together into a tiny performance that will temporarily get the reader’s attention. The highlight of the performance is – of course – the text snapping into the robot’s contour for the finale. Try and imagine a soundtrack that punctuates the action with some whirring and clanking noises, it’s even better that way.

One Comment

  1. May 24, 2014 at 11:34 am, Abstract Art said:

    Some good info, thanks