Archive for January, 2013

January 29, 2013

Adobe Edge Inspect adds accessibility support

Accessibility takes many forms. While many if not most people have a fixed concept of accessibility that revolves around screen-reader compatibility with published content, the reality is that each product, be it an application, a document, a device or a protocol, has its own capabilities and limitations. And when we review our product teams’ work, sometimes we find unexpected ways to improve the user experience for people of all types.

A recent example is one of our newer products, Adobe Edge Inspect—one of a host of apps we’re working on to make HTML-based development easier for developers, designers and testers. Edge Inspect has three components: a desktop application that runs in the System Tray on Windows or the Menu Bar on OSX, which connects mobile apps running on iOS and Android to a Google Chrome extension, allowing testers to browse and debug the same mobile site across numerous devices simultaneously. It’s one of those apps that you don’t know you need until you know you could have it.

When I saw this demo last year, once I picked my jaw up off of the floor, I grabbed their demonstration iPad and turned on VoiceOver, the screen reader that’s built into iOS. This is usually how I shame mobile engineers. (Who says accessibility people can’t have hobbies?) But to my surprise, most of what was there already worked. Before they’d done any custom work, the Edge Inspect team had built a tool that would let me test mobile accessibility use cases alongside the visual layout.

Adobe Accessibility’s Michael Jordan worked with the Edge Inspect team to complete the job, both by tying up loose ends (like naming buttons and ordering controls), and by introducing accessibility features into the Chrome extension. That work is shipping in the latest version of Edge Inspect—which, by the way, you can get just by signing up for a free Adobe Creative Cloud account.

It’s important to remember that it’s not just the end user of a mobile site who may have a disability; your developers and testers may make use of that support as well. We talk a lot with our colleagues at all levels within Adobe about the role accessibility plays in what we create, and how people build upon our work. We can talk about how this or that is required by law, or by policy, but sometimes, as with Edge Inspect, we find a great opportunity to expand both the audience and the capabilities of a tool, with just a little polish. We have even more improvements coming soon, but more importantly, by working together, we have another product team that’s taking a broader view when it comes to designing for their users.

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January 14, 2013

Free Webinar: “Exploring Electronic Document Accessibility”

Adobe is offering a free webinar on document accessibility in conjunction with SSB BART Group and FedInsider News. The webinar will take place Wednesday January 23, from 1:30-2:30 (US eastern time zone).

Jon Avila from SSB BART Group will lead the session which will target managers and content authors in addressing the following topics:

  • Overview of accessibility requirements relevant to document creation.
  • Guidance on how to analyze known problems in existing documentation.
  • Proper use of native document creation software.
  • Techniques for finding and fixing accessibility violations.
  • Best practices to maintain and update document creation processes to ensure ongoing accessibility.

You can read a more information about the webinar and register at http://solutions.adobe.com/?elqPURLPage=114. Please join us for this event!

Update: I neglected to mention it, but the webinar will have live captioning.

Update: The webinar recording is available.

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January 3, 2013

Acrobat XI Accessibility Documentation

On behalf of the Adobe Accessibility team, I’d like to welcome you all to 2013. We’ve got a big year ahead of us, and we’re starting with some new documentation for Acrobat XI.

We’ve updated our Acrobat accessibility training resources page with four new PDFs:

PDF Accessibility Overview
Covers the accessibility features of PDF as a document format, as well as Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader.
Using the Acrobat XI Pro Accessibility Checker
A complete walkthrough of Acrobat XI’s Accessibility Checker, as well as the Make Accessible action wizard.
Acrobat XI Pro PDF Accessibility Repair Workflow
Walk step-by-step through the PDF accessibility process in Acrobat XI.
Acrobat XI Pro Accessible Forms and Interactive Documents
Create interactive forms that can be used by anyone, ensuring privacy and independence for all.

We’ve also created a Acrobat XI accessibility best practices document which contains all four of the above guides in a single file. Documentation for Acrobat versions 8 and up can be found on the training resources page as well.

The new features of Acrobat XI are intended to make creating PDF documents both easier and more automatic. The Make Accessible action wizard walks users through a number of steps, like running optical character recognition and prompting for alternate text on images, and then tests the final product. This makes the process for editing and testing for PDF accessibility a fast, uniform process for authors of all skill levels. The built-in accessibility checker has also been improved, including testing support for the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. We think this is the most substantial improvement in Acrobat accessibility since we added support for assistive technology back in 2002.

The team is looking forward to giving a detailed Adobe Acrobat XI walkthrough at the 28th Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference on February 28th, and at other conferences throughout the year. We hope you’ll find these tutorials useful.

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