Articles categorized under Education

Hard Work Pays Off

Ceballos_1st post_photoAlvaro Ceballos is an AYV Scholarships recipient from New York City. He participated in AYV at Urban Arts Partnership. Alvaro is currently studying Film at the Pratt Institute.

When I left the Dominican Republic I was a junior in high school, very close to starting college. Moving to the United States without knowing English pushed back all my dreams. I needed to start from zero as a freshman in high school again. At first I thought that I would never make it to college, but after all the sacrifices my family and I made, going to college became my priority. I went to ELLIS Preparatory Academy, a school dedicated to serving the academic and social needs of recently arrived youth like myself. Its mission is to assist its international population of students in developing their linguistic, intellectual, cultural and collaborative abilities, so that they may become part of this new culture.

From my second year until my senior year at ELLIS, I was required to do internships. It was at this point in my life when I discovered my passion for art. I interned at the Bronx Museum of the Arts (teen council), the National Museum of the American Indian, Lehman College Art Gallery, Barbara’s Flowers, and Scratch DJ Academy. My final internship was with the Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy at Urban Arts Partnerships. All of these internships helped me a lot, not only academically and socially, but also artistically. Now I am a full-time student at the Pratt Institute with the dream of becoming a film director.

The Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy helped me decide on my college career. Before going to the Academy in early senior year, I was undecided on my major. After interning at the Academy, I realized that film was something that I want to do for the rest of my life as a professional career.  Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy was the only place where I took film classes. I came to the Pratt Institute with knowledge of using Adobe Premiere, and it really helped me for my early assignments in my digital cinema class.

Adjustments in Higher Education

Student Author: Eva Miller

Eva Miller is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Hayward, California. She participated in AYV at Tennyson High School in Hayward. Eva is currently studying Sociology and Communications at California State University, East Bay.

I am more than half way through my first quarter in college. And let me say, it has been an adjustment. For instance, parking is a nightmare, which all I have to compare it to is my high school, where few students drove. Also, in a normal week, I go to school three days out of seven. If you’re not really thinking how great this is, let me do it for you: I do not go to school more than I go to school. I am lucky for this because transitioning has (and I will say it again) been an adjustment.

Miller_1st post_photoAt my college, Cal State East Bay, they require all freshmen to be in a learning community, called clusters. My cluster is named Beats; I thought this would help when producing sound tracks and audio files for my films. A main class of the cluster is Audio Production. I am currently collaborating with a couple of my peers to create a song using audio software. The writing process amuses me as it is required. The song is completely satire and it has been a lot of fun putting it together. My group and I are almost done. Our other classmates have created hype about our song. I am eager to share it with my class.

As my college is in the same community as my home, it has not been hard staying connected with my community, my family, and my friends. I still volunteer and keep in contact with my AYV program (writing this blog post is reminding me to do that more).  Recently, I found out a local community center has an AYV program, and I am aggressively thinking about offering my hands and ideas. I wish I could say I have done more, but as I said before starting college has been an adjustment. And I like to think that once this quarter is over, I will be doing more projects. For example, my cousin has a band, and I will be making music videos for them. I will also be reaching out to my AYV site that has given me so much.

Until next time…

SXSWedu: Top Five Take-Aways for Creative Educators

SXSWeduLast week, over 6,000 educators, entrepreneurs and experts came to Austin, TX for the annual SXSWedu. The Adobe education team was lucky enough to attend and engage around a variety of interesting topics. We were blown away by the support for and interest in creativity in education. Here are our biggest take-aways and “aha” moments from the conference:

5. Creativity is top of mind for innovative educators. From the keynote presentations to the smaller sessions, from the parties to the Twitter back channel, creativity was a hot topic. The LAUNCHedu pitch competition invited entrepreneurs to put their creative solutions to pressing problems to the test. An interactive “playground” space invited participants to build circuits, create analog memes and test drive exciting new creative software and hardware. A session led by Columbia University Teacher’s College focused on unleashing teacher creativity through empowering them as designers. Actor Jeffrey Tambor closed out the conference with a rousing call to attendees to access their own creativity to solve the problems facing education today. A quick scan of the #createedu conversation on Twitter reveals over 603 mentions of the topic that was on the minds of many conference attendees.

4. To foster creativity in education, a transformation is needed. We loved hearing from Dale Dougherty, Erik Natzke and Chad Soleo on how to nurture creativity based on their experience in the workplace and in formal and informal education. Some highlights include:

  • Dedicate a space for students and teachers to play, to explore, to create, and to fail.
  • Teach students they don’t have to solve everything on their own. Practice leaning on community for support and inspiration.
  • Focus more on students and learning processes and less on subjects.
  • Ask students interesting and unsolved questions. Education isn’t just about learning answers but also about learning to explore the unknown.
  • Being held to a specific set of standards doesn’t mean you can’t develop creativity.
  • Support teachers in fostering creativity through professional development and institutional support for innovative approaches to teaching and learning.
  • Showcase student success beyond just test scores with portfolios and exhibitions.

3. Never underestimate the creative power of youth. Jonathan Blake Huer of Ball State University shared his exciting initiative, the Digital Corps, which puts students to work in a hands-on, youth-powered design studio. David Conover of Connally High School proudly presented his innovative game design program for at-risk youth through testimonials of four young men whose lives have been changed by the opportunity to create in the classroom. Chad Soleo of Green Dot Public Schools spoke eloquently about the need for teacher professional development to transform classroom practices that stifle creativity.

2. Roadblocks, challenges and failures are nothing more than creative opportunities. An engaging and interactive session on learning from failure, hosted by the team from Working Examples, got us started thinking about how we handle mistakes. Later, Deborah Morrison from the University of Oregon and Glenn Griffin of the University of Alabama shared their findings from a research study on how creative professionals handle failure. The answer? Creatives don’t give up in the face of staggering personal and professional challenges. Instead, they pivot, change the story and imagine new, better outcomes.

1. We all have a role to play in ensuring creativity is the future. Throughout our time at SXSWedu, we were impressed by the broad array of stakeholders who believe that creativity is a vital skill to be fostered in education. At our meet-up on Tuesday night over 100 attendees pledged to support this movement. Their commitments ranged from personal to professional and to the political. Explore the gallery here.

As SXSWedu comes to an end, we know we can’t let the conversation about creativity in education fade away. It will take more than one person, one school, or one organization to make this transformation—we need a global movement.

We ask you today to pledge your support for creativity in education by visiting http://edex.adobe.com/pledge. Together we’ll shape the future of education and unleash a new generation of creators and innovators.

Ready to Put Your Ideas into Action? Meet the 99U Conference.

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Are you tired of creative conferences that teach you how to dream big, but not how to DO big? Well, we are, too. That’s why we at Behance created the 99U Conference, where we invite visionaries from across industries to share actionable tips on how to execute great ideas. Our incredible 2014 lineup includes 37Signals founder Jason Fried, entrepreneur & author Seth Godin, former RISD president John Maeda, Facebook product design director Julie Zhuo, graffiti artist-turned-entrepreneur Mark Ecko, and many more.

On May 1-2, 2014 in New York City, each of these remarkable idea executors will take the stage at Lincoln Center to deliver a keynote, packing as much insight as possible into a killer 20-minute talk. But making ideas happen isn’t just about listening, which is why we assemble a rich conference program that complements our talks with tons of interactive programming, great takeaway content, and networking parties.

If you’re not already registered, here’s a sneak peek at what your 99U ticket gets you:

1. Seventeen Keynotes w/ Actionable Advice on Idea Execution
Our roster of leading researchers, top entrepreneurs, and accomplished creative visionaries will share actionable, pragmatic advice on making ideas happen through a series of 20-minute keynotes. See the full lineup here.

2. One Collaborative Studio Session
Our one-of-a-kind studio sessions give you an all-access to pass to some of the most creative workplaces in Manhattan. This year’s choices include Spotify, IDEO, Quirky, Red Antler, Refinery29, SYPartners, Fueled, MoMA, and Undercurrent. See studio session topics here.

3. Admission to a 75-minute Master Class
On day one, you’ll get to participate in a 75-minute masterclass featuring one of the world’s leading creative thinkers. Choices include Adobe VP of Community and head of Behance Scott Belsky, Facebook Product Design Director Julie Zhuo, and more. See the masterclass lineup here.

4.  Our Networking Pre-Party at the Art Directors Club
Before we kick off the official conference, we’ll be hosting a killer conference warmup with a slew of networking and skill-building activities — ranging from one-on-one portfolio reviews to creative quiz games to cutting-edge product demos.

5. Access to the Day 1 Cocktail Reception
Close out Day One of the Conference by joining us for complimentary cocktails at Providence, a former church and recording studio just blocks from Lincoln Center.

6. The World’s Greatest Schwag Bag
Design is not an afterthought at 99U. In fact, it influences everything we do — and the Conference is no different. As part of your event experience, you’ll receive a custom-designed 99U schwag bag, packed with gorgeous (and useful!) creative tools, notebooks, and other goodies.

7. Admission to Our Legendary After-Party at MoMA
An open bar, a world-class DJ, and one of the premier museums in the world… It doesn’t get much better than the 99U Afterparty at The Museum of Modern Art. What better way to close out the Conference?

Not registered yet? Get your ticket to 99U today.

Kevin in the Making

Student Author – Kevin Bernardez

Kevin Bernardez is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Boston, Massachusetts. He participated in AYV at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. Kevin is currently attending Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

Hello everyone, my name is Kevin Bernardez, and I am so thrilled to introduce myself as an Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipient. I have to say that it has truly been a wonderful journey for me from the first day of high school until my first day in college. But wait, my journey does not end here. I still have fuel in my tank that has driven me to become a phenomenal student.

I graduated from Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, located in Roxbury, Massachusetts and I am currently enrolled at Fitchburg State University as a pre-major (undecided). Next semester I would love to major in in Film and Video because that is where my heart is, and that is what I’m most passionate about.

I love everything about film, from the different types of cameras to the way people act in scenes. I am not a very good actor, but with experience, I will be. I am very creative behind the scenes with directing, filming shots, and editing the piece. I have also expanded my horizons by creating animations as well.

I became interested in filmmaking when I was in 7th grade. At the time, my siblings and I created our own dance group called the H Star Crew and for a couple years, we had performed at numerous of places around Boston. In order to gain exposure for ourselves, we decided to produce videos and post them on YouTube. None of my siblings knew how to put clips together so I decided to give it a try, then I gradually learned how to edit videos on my own.

While still in middle school, I also produced music videos with an underground Reggae musician from Boston, which has helped gain exposure for his music. In my spare time, I would learn new aspects of video such as creating special effects. I’ve produced two videos using Adobe After Effects. In one video, I animated bringing the world, lighting, and a Super Mario fireball into my hands as I was sitting at my kitchen table. In another video, I cloned myself dancing, as if I was battling against myself.

As a student at Madison Park, I knew that I was going to experience the cutting edge of television and film production. Being a part of the Adobe Youth Voices program has allowed me to grow potential within myself as an artist. I learned things such as making sure you don’t use copy written music, brand, material and so forth. As an AYV alumni and a recipient of the AYV Scholarship, to have the opportunity to socialize with other Adobe Youth Voices students has opened up doors to network with other artists who has the same interest as me and to build on my craft. The only direction to go from here is forward.  

 

Design and Large-scale Systemic Integration in Education

locke hub P1AIn the past few years, design has taken a step into the limelight as a methodology and solution to some of the world’s most pressing problems. Specifically in education, there are good ideas out there – but what seems to be consistently lacking are relevant, and well executed solutions that can work on a systemic scale in public education.

In Los Angeles, No Right Brain Left Behind and Green Dot Public Schools have partnered up to create a system design to transform underused spaces and school libraries into 21st century learning environments. The system, or blue print, as we sometimes call it, involves spatial rejuvenation; curriculum co-development with STEM and literacy partners, teachers and students; curated programming; and strategies for community activation.

Over the course of the past year, the Locke Library Project has engaged over 50 design professionals - many of whom donated their time pro-bono, in the research, spatial design, programming, and community engagement phases. For efficiency and agility, we started lean, and formed a small but dedicated teacher group at Locke High, called the Beta Group. This group of trailblazers worked with our design teams to identify existing pain points and are currently co-creating solutions that are smart and cost effective for the space and programming design. The Beta Group of teachers will be the first to use the space with their students. The Locke High innovation space will be a hub that inspires new kinds of learning, thinking, and being, while building on the success Locke High and its students have experienced during Green Dot’s management.
Green Dot’s curriculum specialists are working hand in hand with 3rd party content developers to co-create curriculums aligned with the new Common Core and Next generation Science Standards. For example, we are currently co-creating a common core aligned STEM motor sports and physics curriculum with IndyCar race driver JR Hildebrand and his engineering team.

Spatially, we are dreaming up a new low-cost furniture system. Based on a well-designed modular core steel structure, this system will be configurable into desks, seating, bookshelves, tabletops and eventually lighting solutions that can be assembled quickly with ease. Ideally we’d like people to build on top of this framework, make it better, and relevant to their spaces and environments.

Our collaborative commitment is simple – to build the best possible human experiences to teach, learn, and develop in – for the schools, teachers, and students that need them the most. Effective design and innovation integration is at the core of that.

To learn more about the work of Green Dot Public Schools and No Right Brain Left Behind, please join a panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410. If you’re not attending SXSW EDU next week, you can follow the conversation @AdobeEdu.

Adobe Joins President Obama’s ConnectED Digital Literacy Initiative

filmfestival_headerforblogToday, I’m fortunate to be visiting the East Room of the White House to be with the winners of the first-ever White House Student Film Festival and their parents, along with cool celebrities like Kal Penn and Conan O’Brien. Without a doubt, this is one of the best things about my job at Adobe – seeing  what students are creating with digital media tools. The winning videos lined up for today will undoubtedly be impressive.

Unleashing creativity in all students and teachers is critical as we prepare this generation for the careers of the future. Today’s students live in an increasingly digital and visual world and must do more than just consume digital media. They must create it in order for their ideas to take shape and their voices heard.

Today, Adobe is happy to announce that it is joining the Department of Education and the President’s ConnectED initiative by making world-class creative tools available to schools across the country, along with innovative professional development and curricular resources to educators. homepg-pod3-284x115Adobe has committed over $300 million to help advance digital learning, teaching, and administration in 15,000 U.S. schools.

This is a continuation of Adobe’s longstanding commitment to education. Over the past 20 years, Adobe has empowered K12 teachers and students and celebrated their creativity:

adobe&eduThe Adobe Education Exchange is the largest online community of creative educators. 127,000 teachers from across the globe connect with each other, learn from free professional development, and explore standards-based resources.

Adobe Youth Voices is the Adobe Foundation’s global initiative to ignite young people’s creativity through the power of storytelling with digital media. Youth develop original media that highlights an issue they care about, identify solutions, and in the process, foster critical creative skills and a passion to make a difference. Since the program’s launch, more than 5,000 educators and 150,000 youth from over 58 countries have developed original, thought-provoking digital media.ayv_logo

Adobe applauds the President’s bold vision for U.S. schools. We share ConnectED’s goal that all students should have access to the world of ideas and the tools they need to build the future.

The Adobe Guide to SXSW 2014

A huge event for tech, film and music – SXSW is filled with so much creativity that of course we have our Adobe fingerprints all over it. Here is a rundown of where to find us, how to connect with us in person and online, activities we want you to join us for, and the places we can all hang out.

Be sure to follow #AdobeSXSW for updates and information. If you need even more details, our site is filled with them. It’s “mobilized” so you can grab all the info when you are on the ground. See you in Austin!

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Need a place to take a break from sessions? Head on over to the Razorfish #UseMeLeaveMe Digital Campground. You can even map yourself over to us. From 4-8pm daily there is a Happy Hour where you can grab a bite and a drink. Be sure to bring a buddy and get in front of our green screen to create a personal Austin #AdobeSXSW videogram you can share with the world. Need a ride back to town? You may be able to jump on a free bike.

Are you a web designer or developer? Join our annual Creative Camp on Friday March 7 in the Riverside Ballroom at the Radisson Town Lake. There are five sessions all about shaping the modern web. Food and drink will be served too.

All you video pros and those of you just starting out, join our Digital Video team at their booth during the Film Festival, in Exhibit Hall 4 of the Austin Convention Center. Get live demos from Creative Cloud workflow experts discussing the latest apps. Jason Levine, Adobe evangelist for video apps/Creative Cloud, is leading a start-to-finish workflow session “Come and Capture: Capture, Cut, Color, Deliver.” The team is also moderating a panel with SoulPancake CEO and executive producer Shabnam Mogharabi and her team.

Students and Teachers attending the SXSWedu Festival should go to Adobe’s panel on fostering and inspiring creativity in a new generation, “Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation.” Also, don’t miss our Creativity in Education Meet Up to network and learn about creativity in education.

Adobe executives are all over Austin this year, and here’s what they are speaking about:

Why Software Companies Should Care about Hardware – Join VP of Experience Design Michael Gough as he and others talk about why companies known for creating incredible software (like Google & Adobe) are boldly pushing into new territory by creating hardware.

How Open Licensing Is Transforming DesignScott Belsky, co-founder & head of Behance & VP products-community at Adobe will join a panel discussing the idea of letting non-clients steal design work (!). A crazy notion before, today it’s a big part of how designers network, collaborate, and create.

Privacy Under the Covers: The Naked Truth – Our chief privacy officer Meme Rasmussen is taking on a controversial and important topic. Hear her break down the misconceptions around data privacy. She will share the stories from leading voices in marketing sciences and legal privacy fields about digital data privacy issues. Learn what data is being collected and how it’s being used.

Interested in all the #SXSW sessions around Adobe products, themes & memes? Go here for a complete list.

Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation

SXSWedu imageTo address tomorrow’s complex challenges, we must prepare today’s students to be creators and innovators. They must learn to take risks, to iterate, to problem-solve, and to see and explore new possibilities. Creativity isn’t just the domain for artists but is required to solve scientific problems and to fuel the economies of the future.

Schools must provide all students with opportunities to develop these abilities. This requires examining curriculum, supporting teachers, and measuring student success beyond just high stakes testing. We love to see examples of amazing teachers and schools such as the Baltimore Design School, but know there is much more to be done to prepare this generation of students.

In collaboration with education and industry partners, Adobe is working to drive awareness and to call for providing opportunities for students to develop their creative muscles. At SXSW Education next week in Austin, Texas, we will host a panel called, “Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation.” I am excited to speak with panelists such as Dale Dougherty (Maker Media), Cristina de Jesus (Green Dot Schools), and Erik Natzke (Adobe) to discuss how to foster and inspire creativity with this generation. We hope to see you there:

  1. Join us at SXSWedu. If you are attending this year’s SXSWedu conference, please join us for a conversation with a fantastic panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410.
  2. Join the conversation. Attend the SXSWedu panel or Creativity Meet Up and share your thoughts and comments using the hashtag #CreateEdu.

Is Engineering Interesting?

Randhir Singh is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Noida, India. He participated in AYV at Noida Public School. Randhir is currently studying Civil Engineering at National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra in Kurukshetra, India.

I know the Theory of Relativity and Einstein’s equations boggles even those who have chosen engineering as their career, but I made a bet that when it comes to the practical sessions and workshops, engineering would become really interesting. And this is what I found out. Want to see how? Come…

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AYV Scholar, Randhir Singh, at work

Workshops generally give us a gist of practical information and exposure to every part of a job we do in Engineering. Here “job” is not the usual term we use in our day to day lives but refers to anything we create in workshops and during practical sessions. In my case too I got this exposure and tried my hand on various tools like the lathe machine, bench vice, and welding set to create jobs related to machine, fitting, welding, foundry etc.

Let me explain to you how interesting these shops were and what I learned from them, how I tackle my problem and the overall workshop experience and problems.

 

Welding Shoprandhir singh at work

Many of us have never even held a welder in our hands and this too was my case. I had no past experience of welding. But our instructor made it really easy for us. The main problem was that you are not supposed to look at the light coming out of it. Thank God we had our goggles and masks. But it was not enough, the Iron sheet attracted the welder many times. This was the most irritating part, but after three classes I finally got it.

 

randhir singh at work2Fitting Shop

This was probably the toughest and most laborious workshop for me. Transforming a circular hole created in a thick iron piece by using triangular files, round files, flat files etc. Rubbing, rubbing and rubbing until I got the perfect shape. No matter how much I perspired, it was still the most interesting job for me.

 

Foundry Shop

randhir singh at work3This was the easiest and dirtiest job we did and it reminded me of my childhood when I used to play with dirt. Wow… in this job we were taught to make a molding of a pattern using rectangular frame and foundry tools.

I still am learning techniques to improve my expertise in each job, the only bad thing is that this class is only once in a week.

But, guys, engineering is really interesting, and if you are keen to find logic behind every day to day happening, then you should surely adopt it as your future. Last but not the least, thanks to Adobe Youth Voices for this scholarship, which made it possible for me to start my college degree in engineering this year and learn such amazing and creative things here.

Thanks a lot!!!

 

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