Results tagged “Adobe”

Earth Month Tip: Managing Energy Use

We’re sharing one tip each week this month in honor of Earth Month. Last week we focused on water conservation and this week is all about energy reduction. Share your favorite green tips with us on social media using hashtag #EarthMonth.

With more than 11,000 employees and over 3 million square feet of real estate around the world, Adobe pays close attention to our energy usage. We have cut our electricity usage by 50% since 2002 which has helped us to achieve carbon neutrality at our owned North American facilities by 2014 – one full year ahead of our goal.

Our main goal is to sustainably manage our business. To that point we rigorously explore ways to reduce our energy and water consumption and to offset 100% of our Scope 1 and 2 emissions from our North America operations through the purchase of renewable energy credits and emission reduction credits to help develop wind farms and landfill biogas plant projects.

While energy reduction is important to Adobe, strength lies in numbers – our impact will be even stronger if we all commit to reducing our energy usage. Here’s an easy way to make a big difference: replace all your incandescent bulbs with LED lights.  An LED can last up to 30 times longer[1], it will use up to 75 percent less energy and you’ll save hundreds of dollars over the life of a single LED[2].

energy_conservation_final
Did you know?  If every American home replaced just one incandescent bulb with an ENERGY STAR rated light, we would save enough energy to light 3 million homes for a year, cut about $680 million in annual energy costs, and avoid releasing 9 billion pounds of greenhouse gas emissions annually – equivalent to taking approximately 800,000 cars off our roads every year.  This is just one way everyone can reduce their energy use.

What are you doing to save energy? Share your insights, photos and tips for us on your social channels using #EarthMonth.

Vince Digneo is Adobe’s sustainability strategist.


 

Adobe Announces Primetime 2.0; Drives TV Everywhere Forward

Our team has been busy at The NAB Show in Las Vegas this week and we’re excited to announce some major updates to Adobe Primetime – the industry’s most advanced TV delivery and monetization platform for programmers and pay-TV service providers. This latest release of Adobe Primetime takes advantage of the latest industry innovations and introduces new capabilities that drive strong viewer engagement and greater flexibility for monetization.

With Adobe Primetime 2.0, broadcasters and pay-TV providers can tap into a new cloud ad insertion service (available today) to insert ads into live, linear and on-demand content across any platform/device. We also unveiled Concurrency Monitoring as an extension to our Emmy award-winning Primetime PayTV Pass service, allowing customers to manage the number of streams accessed across each device. Aside from desktop operating systems, SmartTVs, Android and iOS devices, Adobe Primetime 2.0 now supports XBox 360 gaming consoles and Roku devices.

Additional capabilities in Adobe Primetime (coming later this year) being demonstrated at The NAB Show include support for MPEG-DASH and the new ultra high definition television (UHDTV) standard, which will allow media companies to deliver content across 4K enabled SmartTVs and other IP-connected devices. Check out our full announcement for all the details.

A Preview of 4K UHDTV Support, Powered by Adobe Primetime

A Preview of 4K UHDTV Support, Powered by Adobe Primetime

It’s been a year since Adobe Primetime launched at The 2013 NAB Show and it’s now been adopted by major customers worldwide including Comcast, NBC Sports, Turner Broadcasting, Tennis Channel, and M6 RTL Group – and has supported massive events such as the Sochi Olympics for NBC Sports. The latest customer wins include Shaw Media and Bell Media in Canada. In the U.S., Major League Baseball (MLB) and World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) have started using Adobe Primetime to deliver live and on-demand video content across desktops and XBox 360 gaming consoles.

If you’re at The NAB Show, stop by the Adobe booth (#SL3910 in the Lower South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center) to see a demo of the latest innovations in Adobe Primetime coming to a screen near you!

Being Green Means Taking Action

As Adobe continues to grow and evolve, we remain committed to responsibly managing the impact of our operations, exceeding industry standards and fostering a culture of environmental sustainability. Every April, we celebrate “Be Green Month” to give employees new ways to take environmentally meaningful actions at work, in our communities, and at home.

GreenTeams2Led by our Green Teams in 20 sites around the world, a number of educational programs, volunteer projects, and other activities will take place throughout the month. This year, “Be Green Fairs” will be organized to inform employees of local Corporate Responsibility initiatives and provide them with the opportunity to meet with organizations that offer sustainable living options.

Here on Adobe Conversations, we’ll be sharing our success stories on water conversation, energy efficiency, waste management and travel reduction. The strides we’ve made are documented in our reports, but our hope is to inspire businesses and individuals to take action as well.

As we turn our attention to how we can keep our planet thriving, we look forward to your participation and ideas.

Adjustments in Higher Education

Student Author: Eva Miller

Eva Miller is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Hayward, California. She participated in AYV at Tennyson High School in Hayward. Eva is currently studying Sociology and Communications at California State University, East Bay.

I am more than half way through my first quarter in college. And let me say, it has been an adjustment. For instance, parking is a nightmare, which all I have to compare it to is my high school, where few students drove. Also, in a normal week, I go to school three days out of seven. If you’re not really thinking how great this is, let me do it for you: I do not go to school more than I go to school. I am lucky for this because transitioning has (and I will say it again) been an adjustment.

Miller_1st post_photoAt my college, Cal State East Bay, they require all freshmen to be in a learning community, called clusters. My cluster is named Beats; I thought this would help when producing sound tracks and audio files for my films. A main class of the cluster is Audio Production. I am currently collaborating with a couple of my peers to create a song using audio software. The writing process amuses me as it is required. The song is completely satire and it has been a lot of fun putting it together. My group and I are almost done. Our other classmates have created hype about our song. I am eager to share it with my class.

As my college is in the same community as my home, it has not been hard staying connected with my community, my family, and my friends. I still volunteer and keep in contact with my AYV program (writing this blog post is reminding me to do that more).  Recently, I found out a local community center has an AYV program, and I am aggressively thinking about offering my hands and ideas. I wish I could say I have done more, but as I said before starting college has been an adjustment. And I like to think that once this quarter is over, I will be doing more projects. For example, my cousin has a band, and I will be making music videos for them. I will also be reaching out to my AYV site that has given me so much.

Until next time…

SXSWedu: Top Five Take-Aways for Creative Educators

SXSWeduLast week, over 6,000 educators, entrepreneurs and experts came to Austin, TX for the annual SXSWedu. The Adobe education team was lucky enough to attend and engage around a variety of interesting topics. We were blown away by the support for and interest in creativity in education. Here are our biggest take-aways and “aha” moments from the conference:

5. Creativity is top of mind for innovative educators. From the keynote presentations to the smaller sessions, from the parties to the Twitter back channel, creativity was a hot topic. The LAUNCHedu pitch competition invited entrepreneurs to put their creative solutions to pressing problems to the test. An interactive “playground” space invited participants to build circuits, create analog memes and test drive exciting new creative software and hardware. A session led by Columbia University Teacher’s College focused on unleashing teacher creativity through empowering them as designers. Actor Jeffrey Tambor closed out the conference with a rousing call to attendees to access their own creativity to solve the problems facing education today. A quick scan of the #createedu conversation on Twitter reveals over 603 mentions of the topic that was on the minds of many conference attendees.

4. To foster creativity in education, a transformation is needed. We loved hearing from Dale Dougherty, Erik Natzke and Chad Soleo on how to nurture creativity based on their experience in the workplace and in formal and informal education. Some highlights include:

  • Dedicate a space for students and teachers to play, to explore, to create, and to fail.
  • Teach students they don’t have to solve everything on their own. Practice leaning on community for support and inspiration.
  • Focus more on students and learning processes and less on subjects.
  • Ask students interesting and unsolved questions. Education isn’t just about learning answers but also about learning to explore the unknown.
  • Being held to a specific set of standards doesn’t mean you can’t develop creativity.
  • Support teachers in fostering creativity through professional development and institutional support for innovative approaches to teaching and learning.
  • Showcase student success beyond just test scores with portfolios and exhibitions.

3. Never underestimate the creative power of youth. Jonathan Blake Huer of Ball State University shared his exciting initiative, the Digital Corps, which puts students to work in a hands-on, youth-powered design studio. David Conover of Connally High School proudly presented his innovative game design program for at-risk youth through testimonials of four young men whose lives have been changed by the opportunity to create in the classroom. Chad Soleo of Green Dot Public Schools spoke eloquently about the need for teacher professional development to transform classroom practices that stifle creativity.

2. Roadblocks, challenges and failures are nothing more than creative opportunities. An engaging and interactive session on learning from failure, hosted by the team from Working Examples, got us started thinking about how we handle mistakes. Later, Deborah Morrison from the University of Oregon and Glenn Griffin of the University of Alabama shared their findings from a research study on how creative professionals handle failure. The answer? Creatives don’t give up in the face of staggering personal and professional challenges. Instead, they pivot, change the story and imagine new, better outcomes.

1. We all have a role to play in ensuring creativity is the future. Throughout our time at SXSWedu, we were impressed by the broad array of stakeholders who believe that creativity is a vital skill to be fostered in education. At our meet-up on Tuesday night over 100 attendees pledged to support this movement. Their commitments ranged from personal to professional and to the political. Explore the gallery here.

As SXSWedu comes to an end, we know we can’t let the conversation about creativity in education fade away. It will take more than one person, one school, or one organization to make this transformation—we need a global movement.

We ask you today to pledge your support for creativity in education by visiting http://edex.adobe.com/pledge. Together we’ll shape the future of education and unleash a new generation of creators and innovators.

Kevin in the Making

Student Author – Kevin Bernardez

Kevin Bernardez is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Boston, Massachusetts. He participated in AYV at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. Kevin is currently attending Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

Hello everyone, my name is Kevin Bernardez, and I am so thrilled to introduce myself as an Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipient. I have to say that it has truly been a wonderful journey for me from the first day of high school until my first day in college. But wait, my journey does not end here. I still have fuel in my tank that has driven me to become a phenomenal student.

I graduated from Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, located in Roxbury, Massachusetts and I am currently enrolled at Fitchburg State University as a pre-major (undecided). Next semester I would love to major in in Film and Video because that is where my heart is, and that is what I’m most passionate about.

I love everything about film, from the different types of cameras to the way people act in scenes. I am not a very good actor, but with experience, I will be. I am very creative behind the scenes with directing, filming shots, and editing the piece. I have also expanded my horizons by creating animations as well.

I became interested in filmmaking when I was in 7th grade. At the time, my siblings and I created our own dance group called the H Star Crew and for a couple years, we had performed at numerous of places around Boston. In order to gain exposure for ourselves, we decided to produce videos and post them on YouTube. None of my siblings knew how to put clips together so I decided to give it a try, then I gradually learned how to edit videos on my own.

While still in middle school, I also produced music videos with an underground Reggae musician from Boston, which has helped gain exposure for his music. In my spare time, I would learn new aspects of video such as creating special effects. I’ve produced two videos using Adobe After Effects. In one video, I animated bringing the world, lighting, and a Super Mario fireball into my hands as I was sitting at my kitchen table. In another video, I cloned myself dancing, as if I was battling against myself.

As a student at Madison Park, I knew that I was going to experience the cutting edge of television and film production. Being a part of the Adobe Youth Voices program has allowed me to grow potential within myself as an artist. I learned things such as making sure you don’t use copy written music, brand, material and so forth. As an AYV alumni and a recipient of the AYV Scholarship, to have the opportunity to socialize with other Adobe Youth Voices students has opened up doors to network with other artists who has the same interest as me and to build on my craft. The only direction to go from here is forward.  

 

Design and Large-scale Systemic Integration in Education

locke hub P1AIn the past few years, design has taken a step into the limelight as a methodology and solution to some of the world’s most pressing problems. Specifically in education, there are good ideas out there – but what seems to be consistently lacking are relevant, and well executed solutions that can work on a systemic scale in public education.

In Los Angeles, No Right Brain Left Behind and Green Dot Public Schools have partnered up to create a system design to transform underused spaces and school libraries into 21st century learning environments. The system, or blue print, as we sometimes call it, involves spatial rejuvenation; curriculum co-development with STEM and literacy partners, teachers and students; curated programming; and strategies for community activation.

Over the course of the past year, the Locke Library Project has engaged over 50 design professionals - many of whom donated their time pro-bono, in the research, spatial design, programming, and community engagement phases. For efficiency and agility, we started lean, and formed a small but dedicated teacher group at Locke High, called the Beta Group. This group of trailblazers worked with our design teams to identify existing pain points and are currently co-creating solutions that are smart and cost effective for the space and programming design. The Beta Group of teachers will be the first to use the space with their students. The Locke High innovation space will be a hub that inspires new kinds of learning, thinking, and being, while building on the success Locke High and its students have experienced during Green Dot’s management.
Green Dot’s curriculum specialists are working hand in hand with 3rd party content developers to co-create curriculums aligned with the new Common Core and Next generation Science Standards. For example, we are currently co-creating a common core aligned STEM motor sports and physics curriculum with IndyCar race driver JR Hildebrand and his engineering team.

Spatially, we are dreaming up a new low-cost furniture system. Based on a well-designed modular core steel structure, this system will be configurable into desks, seating, bookshelves, tabletops and eventually lighting solutions that can be assembled quickly with ease. Ideally we’d like people to build on top of this framework, make it better, and relevant to their spaces and environments.

Our collaborative commitment is simple – to build the best possible human experiences to teach, learn, and develop in – for the schools, teachers, and students that need them the most. Effective design and innovation integration is at the core of that.

To learn more about the work of Green Dot Public Schools and No Right Brain Left Behind, please join a panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410. If you’re not attending SXSW EDU next week, you can follow the conversation @AdobeEdu.

Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation

SXSWedu imageTo address tomorrow’s complex challenges, we must prepare today’s students to be creators and innovators. They must learn to take risks, to iterate, to problem-solve, and to see and explore new possibilities. Creativity isn’t just the domain for artists but is required to solve scientific problems and to fuel the economies of the future.

Schools must provide all students with opportunities to develop these abilities. This requires examining curriculum, supporting teachers, and measuring student success beyond just high stakes testing. We love to see examples of amazing teachers and schools such as the Baltimore Design School, but know there is much more to be done to prepare this generation of students.

In collaboration with education and industry partners, Adobe is working to drive awareness and to call for providing opportunities for students to develop their creative muscles. At SXSW Education next week in Austin, Texas, we will host a panel called, “Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation.” I am excited to speak with panelists such as Dale Dougherty (Maker Media), Cristina de Jesus (Green Dot Schools), and Erik Natzke (Adobe) to discuss how to foster and inspire creativity with this generation. We hope to see you there:

  1. Join us at SXSWedu. If you are attending this year’s SXSWedu conference, please join us for a conversation with a fantastic panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410.
  2. Join the conversation. Attend the SXSWedu panel or Creativity Meet Up and share your thoughts and comments using the hashtag #CreateEdu.

An Experience of a Maynoothian

Student Author: Delia Aires

Delia Aires is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Dublin, Ireland. She participated in AYV at the Blanchardstown Computer Clubhouse Foroige. Delia is currently studying Digital Media at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

This month has been one of the most inspiring, intriguing and exciting months of my life to date! Why? Because I’m in college, finally.

Since beginning University my eyes have been dramatically opened. It is a completely different world to the one I have been living in so far. For me, University is a place of freedom, friendship and the most important of all, learning. Before I arrived here, I expected it to be comprised of these components but never did I imagine how much they would be a part of college life. It is worlds away from Secondary school (High school) in that self-motivation is necessary. This instills great qualities within the individual, including responsibility.

The new friendships I have made already have been eye-opening. I have met all kinds of young people from all walks of life who, like myself, are eager to dive head first into the wonderful new adventure that is, college life and learning. I hope to not only learn from my lecturers, but from my peers also.

photo 2_survival guideLuckily, there are some amazing facilities in my University with access to Mac labs and TV studios nearby. Creativity is promoted. In fact, the leader of the student union, Mal Callan, thrust us into this creative environment from day one. For us incoming Freshers (First Years), he wrote a book named ‘The First Year Survival Guide’. This is not just an ordinary book though. The craftsmanship within it is pristine. It contains advice on how to be happy and healthy in college through humour. The sheer creativity and skill executed by Mal in this project has influenced my own creativity greatly. The true spirit of talent shines from it, which is helping and inspiring our college community for the better.

Speaking of creativity, I have recently completed working on and editing my first video project in Digital Media, the course I am doing. Although the process was long, I gained knowledge from it. Working with interesting and creative people allowed me to broaden my own creativity once more. I hope that this will continue throughout my life.

As this blog comes to a close, I must stress how grateful I am for this AYV scholarship. With it, I am thriving and gaining new information constantly through University. Without it, I would not be doing so. The main message this Adobe scholarship has embedded in my mind is that creativity and education combined can achieve a multitude of dreams and goals.

Fractals: An Infinite Fascination

Student author: Karishma Changlani

Karishma Changlani is an AYV Scholarships recipient from Mumbai, India. She participated in Adobe Youth Voices at CLT India Bangalore. Karishma is studying Computer Science at Drexel University in Philadelphia, where she is part of the Honors Program.

 

In March 2013, I stumbled upon a beautiful artwork: Joy by Eli Vokounova.

 photo 1

I couldn’t quite describe what I felt. It was amazement filled with “Joy.” I wanted to learn to make others feel this way with my work. So I started following this amazing artist on deviant art and came across the world of “Fractal Art”.

This medium of art helped me realize how imagination and a few techniques make someone create something completely out of this world. And how much technology can help us achieve this.

Being a Computer Science major this astounded me. I felt more in love with the human mind and its inventions.

Now, you must be wondering what is Fractal Art?

First you need to understand what fractal geometry is:

Fractal Geometry: “The geometric characterization of the simplest fractals is self-similarity: the shape is made of smaller copies of itself. The copies are similar to the whole: same shape but different size.”

Basically a fractal geometric figure is one that repeats in itself indefinitely. This video by Tara Roys gives a simple explanation of the same:

Moreover, you can see in the following images the shape (not color) repeats itself indefinitely in itself:

 

Alive by Johanna

 

Friday Night by Tatyana Zabanova

In turn, fractal art is art created using this type of geometry.  There are many types of fractal art including the famous Mandelbrot Set.

But what are the things that makes fractal art so unique is:

  1. The elegant algorithm that goes into making one.
  2. Digital medium making fractal art so fascinating.
  3. The unlimited possibilities
  4. Etc.

What I love the most is how all one needs is a computer with appropriate fractal interpreter and imagination.  In fact one could possibly create a fractal in Adobe Photoshop using Fractus and Buddhabrot.

I have made fractal art a very important part of my creative life. I intend to work on a creative project that would not only educate people about the fractal geometry but also help me express myself and my opinions in a more artistic way.

Some of my own fractal works are:

 photo4

Frozen Vines

 

Autumn Sky

 

Moonlit Nature

To check out more of me go to: http://doodler0305.deviantart.com/

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Adobe

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