Results tagged “Adobe Education”

Adjustments in Higher Education

Student Author: Eva Miller

Eva Miller is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Hayward, California. She participated in AYV at Tennyson High School in Hayward. Eva is currently studying Sociology and Communications at California State University, East Bay.

I am more than half way through my first quarter in college. And let me say, it has been an adjustment. For instance, parking is a nightmare, which all I have to compare it to is my high school, where few students drove. Also, in a normal week, I go to school three days out of seven. If you’re not really thinking how great this is, let me do it for you: I do not go to school more than I go to school. I am lucky for this because transitioning has (and I will say it again) been an adjustment.

Miller_1st post_photoAt my college, Cal State East Bay, they require all freshmen to be in a learning community, called clusters. My cluster is named Beats; I thought this would help when producing sound tracks and audio files for my films. A main class of the cluster is Audio Production. I am currently collaborating with a couple of my peers to create a song using audio software. The writing process amuses me as it is required. The song is completely satire and it has been a lot of fun putting it together. My group and I are almost done. Our other classmates have created hype about our song. I am eager to share it with my class.

As my college is in the same community as my home, it has not been hard staying connected with my community, my family, and my friends. I still volunteer and keep in contact with my AYV program (writing this blog post is reminding me to do that more).  Recently, I found out a local community center has an AYV program, and I am aggressively thinking about offering my hands and ideas. I wish I could say I have done more, but as I said before starting college has been an adjustment. And I like to think that once this quarter is over, I will be doing more projects. For example, my cousin has a band, and I will be making music videos for them. I will also be reaching out to my AYV site that has given me so much.

Until next time…

Kevin in the Making

Student Author – Kevin Bernardez

Kevin Bernardez is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Boston, Massachusetts. He participated in AYV at Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. Kevin is currently attending Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

Hello everyone, my name is Kevin Bernardez, and I am so thrilled to introduce myself as an Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipient. I have to say that it has truly been a wonderful journey for me from the first day of high school until my first day in college. But wait, my journey does not end here. I still have fuel in my tank that has driven me to become a phenomenal student.

I graduated from Madison Park Technical Vocational High School, located in Roxbury, Massachusetts and I am currently enrolled at Fitchburg State University as a pre-major (undecided). Next semester I would love to major in in Film and Video because that is where my heart is, and that is what I’m most passionate about.

I love everything about film, from the different types of cameras to the way people act in scenes. I am not a very good actor, but with experience, I will be. I am very creative behind the scenes with directing, filming shots, and editing the piece. I have also expanded my horizons by creating animations as well.

I became interested in filmmaking when I was in 7th grade. At the time, my siblings and I created our own dance group called the H Star Crew and for a couple years, we had performed at numerous of places around Boston. In order to gain exposure for ourselves, we decided to produce videos and post them on YouTube. None of my siblings knew how to put clips together so I decided to give it a try, then I gradually learned how to edit videos on my own.

While still in middle school, I also produced music videos with an underground Reggae musician from Boston, which has helped gain exposure for his music. In my spare time, I would learn new aspects of video such as creating special effects. I’ve produced two videos using Adobe After Effects. In one video, I animated bringing the world, lighting, and a Super Mario fireball into my hands as I was sitting at my kitchen table. In another video, I cloned myself dancing, as if I was battling against myself.

As a student at Madison Park, I knew that I was going to experience the cutting edge of television and film production. Being a part of the Adobe Youth Voices program has allowed me to grow potential within myself as an artist. I learned things such as making sure you don’t use copy written music, brand, material and so forth. As an AYV alumni and a recipient of the AYV Scholarship, to have the opportunity to socialize with other Adobe Youth Voices students has opened up doors to network with other artists who has the same interest as me and to build on my craft. The only direction to go from here is forward.  

 

An Experience of a Maynoothian

Student Author: Delia Aires

Delia Aires is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Dublin, Ireland. She participated in AYV at the Blanchardstown Computer Clubhouse Foroige. Delia is currently studying Digital Media at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

This month has been one of the most inspiring, intriguing and exciting months of my life to date! Why? Because I’m in college, finally.

Since beginning University my eyes have been dramatically opened. It is a completely different world to the one I have been living in so far. For me, University is a place of freedom, friendship and the most important of all, learning. Before I arrived here, I expected it to be comprised of these components but never did I imagine how much they would be a part of college life. It is worlds away from Secondary school (High school) in that self-motivation is necessary. This instills great qualities within the individual, including responsibility.

The new friendships I have made already have been eye-opening. I have met all kinds of young people from all walks of life who, like myself, are eager to dive head first into the wonderful new adventure that is, college life and learning. I hope to not only learn from my lecturers, but from my peers also.

photo 2_survival guideLuckily, there are some amazing facilities in my University with access to Mac labs and TV studios nearby. Creativity is promoted. In fact, the leader of the student union, Mal Callan, thrust us into this creative environment from day one. For us incoming Freshers (First Years), he wrote a book named ‘The First Year Survival Guide’. This is not just an ordinary book though. The craftsmanship within it is pristine. It contains advice on how to be happy and healthy in college through humour. The sheer creativity and skill executed by Mal in this project has influenced my own creativity greatly. The true spirit of talent shines from it, which is helping and inspiring our college community for the better.

Speaking of creativity, I have recently completed working on and editing my first video project in Digital Media, the course I am doing. Although the process was long, I gained knowledge from it. Working with interesting and creative people allowed me to broaden my own creativity once more. I hope that this will continue throughout my life.

As this blog comes to a close, I must stress how grateful I am for this AYV scholarship. With it, I am thriving and gaining new information constantly through University. Without it, I would not be doing so. The main message this Adobe scholarship has embedded in my mind is that creativity and education combined can achieve a multitude of dreams and goals.

Fractals: An Infinite Fascination

Student author: Karishma Changlani

Karishma Changlani is an AYV Scholarships recipient from Mumbai, India. She participated in Adobe Youth Voices at CLT India Bangalore. Karishma is studying Computer Science at Drexel University in Philadelphia, where she is part of the Honors Program.

 

In March 2013, I stumbled upon a beautiful artwork: Joy by Eli Vokounova.

 photo 1

I couldn’t quite describe what I felt. It was amazement filled with “Joy.” I wanted to learn to make others feel this way with my work. So I started following this amazing artist on deviant art and came across the world of “Fractal Art”.

This medium of art helped me realize how imagination and a few techniques make someone create something completely out of this world. And how much technology can help us achieve this.

Being a Computer Science major this astounded me. I felt more in love with the human mind and its inventions.

Now, you must be wondering what is Fractal Art?

First you need to understand what fractal geometry is:

Fractal Geometry: “The geometric characterization of the simplest fractals is self-similarity: the shape is made of smaller copies of itself. The copies are similar to the whole: same shape but different size.”

Basically a fractal geometric figure is one that repeats in itself indefinitely. This video by Tara Roys gives a simple explanation of the same:

Moreover, you can see in the following images the shape (not color) repeats itself indefinitely in itself:

 

Alive by Johanna

 

Friday Night by Tatyana Zabanova

In turn, fractal art is art created using this type of geometry.  There are many types of fractal art including the famous Mandelbrot Set.

But what are the things that makes fractal art so unique is:

  1. The elegant algorithm that goes into making one.
  2. Digital medium making fractal art so fascinating.
  3. The unlimited possibilities
  4. Etc.

What I love the most is how all one needs is a computer with appropriate fractal interpreter and imagination.  In fact one could possibly create a fractal in Adobe Photoshop using Fractus and Buddhabrot.

I have made fractal art a very important part of my creative life. I intend to work on a creative project that would not only educate people about the fractal geometry but also help me express myself and my opinions in a more artistic way.

Some of my own fractal works are:

 photo4

Frozen Vines

 

Autumn Sky

 

Moonlit Nature

To check out more of me go to: http://doodler0305.deviantart.com/

Let the Post-Secondary Education Begin!

FriesenStudent Author: Caleb Friesen

Caleb Friesen is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada and participated in AYV at Canterbury High School. Caleb is currently in the Media stream of the Communications program at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia, Canada, and plans to become a Photojournalist. 

Well, I’m finally at university, and I can’t quite believe it. The time has passed so quickly. I remember a younger me looking across the playground at the seventh grade students of my elementary school and thinking, “It’s going to take me forever to get that old.” I’ve far surpassed that level of education, and am currently attending Trinity Western University.

This is a new campus, a new city, and a new stage of life for me. How did I get here? Why am I here? Is this really happening? All three of these questions have passed through my mind in the last few weeks. Answers to these questions float around inside of my brain though too.

How did I get here? Well, hard work I suppose. Dedication maybe? I know talent helped a bit as well. But it wasn’t just me that got me here. I’ve been fortunate enough to be surrounded by people who believe in my cause and care about me. God, family, teachers, friends and even people I have yet to meet have all gotten me to where I am today.

Why am I here? That’s a tougher question to answer, because there are so many different vantage points one can observe it from. My parents think I’m here so that I can graduate and get a good job and live a happy, healthy life. My peers think I’m here because post-secondary is what all the kids are doing these days. My teachers think I’m here because the interest I showed in their classes reflects a desire to learn and use what I learn to benefit myself, and the world around me. I think I’m here because this is where God wants me to be. I believe that the way things all fell into place to allow me to be here did not occur by chance. I also think that I’m here because of the desire that led me here. If I didn’t want to get an education after high school, I wouldn’t have. It’s the fact that there is so much to learn and discover here that drew me in, and it’s the promise of opportunity and adventure that keep me here.

Is this really happening? Well, the simple answer is yes. The complicated answer deals with 16th century philosopher, Descartes, and his arguments supporting the theory of dualism, references to The Matrix and Inception, and a lot of brain-pain, but I’ll save that for the PHIL 105 paper I’m in the process of writing.

I’m missing my family, struggling to maintain a somewhat healthy sleep schedule, and working hard to stay on top of all the work university requires of students. None of those things mitigate my desire to be here though, or how much I’m enjoying this experience. To attend university is such a privilege and an honour, and I’m so glad I’m here.

Friesen_1st post_photo

Inspiration in Animation

Student Author: Marné Pool

Marné Pool is an AYV Scholarships recipient from San Jose, California. She participated in AYV at Willow Glen High School in San Jose. Marné is currently studying Digital Art and Animation at Cogswell Polytechnical College in Sunnyvale, California.

This semester I am taking my first animation class! Since I want to be an animator, I was really excited to finally learn about it. The class is focused on 2D animation so we use traditional techniques to create short animations.

When I first started, I had a vague idea of how the process worked. It was quite difficult at first! There were many techniques, like how to roll or flip the paper, which took a bit of time to get the hang of.

We started with a simple ball bounce to learn the most basic concepts and from there we worked up to more complicated assignments. I realized that one of the most important things to understand is timing. The timing makes an animation believable, which helps the audience connect to the story you are trying to tell. If the timing is off, the viewer will become distanced from the piece and lose interest.

Although I would like to do 3-D animation, knowing the techniques of 2D will help me a lot — all the same principles must be applied for a successful animation.

After the ball drop, we did all the standard tests like a leaf falling, flour sack drop, water splash and a brick drop. Each object reacts differently when dropped, some are hard and rigid, while others are smoother and organic.  Each assignment required that we shoot our own reference — it’s a very hands on kind of thing! These assignments take a lot of time and effort to get the right feel. After lots of hours and thick stacks of paper, we have a few seconds of animation finished!

After working on objects, we moved on to characters. Achieving a smooth, believable character walk took a few attempts, but I did find it more natural animating a human, since I’m more familiar with the way people move.

For our final project, we are creating 15–30 second shorts involving one character interacting with a 2 liter soda bottle. We must display a change in emotion as they interact with the bottle. It has to be an obvious difference from the beginning to the end of the sequence. This will require that I create storyboards, an animatic, and finally, the many passes of the actual animations.

Although the work can be tedious, this class is very inspiring. I look at the animated movies from my childhood with a new appreciation. I now understand the extent of the work that went into each scene. All the subtleties of the characters stand out to me. I love all the little details in the animation that give the characters a connection to the audience.  These otherwise cold, flat pictures come alive and tell beautiful heartwarming stories. I aspire to create the same kind of magic in my own work someday.

Congratulations to the 2013 Winners of the Congressional Art Competition!

Tacy Trowbridge Winners CAC 2013Each spring, high school students from around the United States are honored by Congress through a visual art competition. Since its beginning in 1982, more than 650,000 students have participated. Each year, winners from more than 400 Congressional Districts are invited to an awards ceremony in the U.S. Capitol and their works are displayed in the busy hallways beneath the capitol building. Adobe was honored to attend the event and help celebrate students’ creativity and their achievements. 

It is particularly important to celebrate creative student work in light of recent study results about the barriers to creativity in education, which revealed that:

-          Almost 90% of parents and educators believe that fostering creativity in education will fuel the economies of tomorrow

-          More than 70% of parents and educators believe that creativity is not valued by the current education system

As we look to the future, creativity is essential to drive innovation and ultimately to make the world a better place. Innovation is not the sole domain of entrepreneurs, of engineers, or of programmers. Artists create meaning, communicate ideas and help us all see new problems and solutions. To succeed, we must not only invest in STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – but also in the arts to grow our economy for the future. We need to expand our focus from STEM to STEAM. Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici (pictured above), one of this year’s co-sponsors of the event, is also a co-founder of the Congressional STEAM Caucus and has been active in advocating the value of creativity.

These students are already sharing and expressing creative ideas. Their creativity inspires hope and these students will lead the kind of innovation that improves our lives and solves the real problems we will face in the decades to come.

To further inspire self-expression and innovation, Adobe invites students to join the broader creative community by giving each winner a free year-long subscription to Adobe’s Creative Cloud. I want to extend my warmest congratulations to all of the students who participated and shared their ideas with us. We can’t wait to see what you create next!

Study Reveals Education System is Stifling Creativity

adobe_Education_infographics FINALBToday, Adobe released a research study that reveals the state of creativity in education. It highlights the importance of preparing students to be innovators and how testing and government mandates are stifling creativity in the classroom.

This international study, “Barriers to Creativity in Education: Educators and Parents Grade the System,” shows there is a growing concern that the education system itself is a barrier to developing the creativity that drives innovation. Parents and educators agree that today’s education system places too much emphasis on testing and not enough investment in the training, tools and time needed to teach creativity.

Among the 4,000 adults, 2,000 were educators and 2,000 were parents of students in K-12 and higher education. A strong majority of the participants across the United States, United Kingdom, Germany and Australia, call for a transformation in the ways schools work. Furthermore, educators agree that they can do more to foster creativity with more tools and training to integrate it into the classroom.

When asked about the most important step to promote and foster creativity in education, U.S. respondents cited the need to:

  • Provide tools and training to teach creativity
  • Make creativity integral to the curriculum
  • Reduce mandates that hinder creativity

Please take a look at the survey data and share your thoughts with us here or join the conversation on twitter using #createnowedu and follow us at @adobeedu. Additional information available through:

Join Adobe for a Twitter Conversation with Sir Ken Robinson

SirKenI wanted to encourage you to join the conversation with Sir Ken Robinson, as we discuss themes from his new book, Finding Your Element, and explore how fostering creativity in education is critical to unleashing personal passion and discovering hidden talents.

Simply follow the conversation and participate on Thursday, June 13 at 11:00 a.m. PST using the #AdobeandSirKen hashtag. We will also select two questions from participants to include in the interview so send us your ideas. Additionally, those who use the hashtag #adobeandsirken will have a chance to win a signed copy of the new book!

Plan on attending? RSVP at: http://adobeandsirken.eventbrite.com.

Click here for the rules for the book give-away.

Be sure to follow @AdobeEdu for the latest details and updates.

Highlights from Adobe Digital Publishing Summit

DPS Summit_cLast month I attended the Adobe Digital Publishing Summit in New York City. Marketing executives and creatives from publishers and corporations as well as faculty and staff from educational institutions gathered to discuss trends, use cases and best practices in digital publishing.

During the Summit, I had a chance to meet with some education customers to discuss how students, faculty, alumni, and athletic fans expect information and news beyond what can be communicated in a printed format—wanting to access it on their mobile devices, smartphones and tablets. I also learned how colleges and universities are using DPS to create digital publications that captivate their campus constituents. Here are some of the key things I learned from education customers who attended the Summit:

  • Tim O’Connor from Notre Dame Athletics shared the game day app that was developed for the 2013 BCS National Championship Football Game. Content was based on its print gameday program, but included other assets such as photography and video—some which had been unavailable to the public before. Because Notre Dame has fantastic photographers and videographers, they were able to “create an app without recreating anything.” Tim explained that through the app, the school had an opportunity to stay more engaged and connected with their fan base. Download the Notre Dame game day app from the iTunes store and follow along with the game today.
  • Education Marketing staff in attendance were interested in using DPS to stay connected with their alumni and discussed ways their admissions departments could recruit new students leveraging the engaging functionality DPS provides. Attendees were impressed by the ability to track and measure the effectiveness of their apps with the built in analytics.
  • Faculty that are currently teaching DPS skills were thrilled to see how their students are creating their own apps while gaining highly employable skills. Marketers I spoke with from publishers and corporations who attended the Summit all expressed the need for more graduates that are proficient in digital publishing skills—knowing how to create and deliver digital content—especially for tablet devices. See how Oregon University is teaching their journalism students these new skills here.

It was really exciting to see how publishers like National Geographic and companies such as Sotheby’s International Realty are embracing DPS to deliver highly engaging digital content. It’s even more exciting to see Higher Education Institutions leverage DPS to help turn static, printed pieces like recruitment brochures, game-day programs, alumni magazines, and even coursework into interactive pieces that keep their audience coming back for more. To learn about Adobe Digital Publishing Suite and how it can increase the impact of your institution’s communications, promote sustainability and help students develop in-demand career skills, visit us here. Also, check out an additional recap from the Summit and come back to download the Adobe Digital Publishing Summit App to see speaker presentations and videos.

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