Results tagged “Education”

Hard Work Pays Off

Ceballos_1st post_photoAlvaro Ceballos is an AYV Scholarships recipient from New York City. He participated in AYV at Urban Arts Partnership. Alvaro is currently studying Film at the Pratt Institute.

When I left the Dominican Republic I was a junior in high school, very close to starting college. Moving to the United States without knowing English pushed back all my dreams. I needed to start from zero as a freshman in high school again. At first I thought that I would never make it to college, but after all the sacrifices my family and I made, going to college became my priority. I went to ELLIS Preparatory Academy, a school dedicated to serving the academic and social needs of recently arrived youth like myself. Its mission is to assist its international population of students in developing their linguistic, intellectual, cultural and collaborative abilities, so that they may become part of this new culture.

From my second year until my senior year at ELLIS, I was required to do internships. It was at this point in my life when I discovered my passion for art. I interned at the Bronx Museum of the Arts (teen council), the National Museum of the American Indian, Lehman College Art Gallery, Barbara’s Flowers, and Scratch DJ Academy. My final internship was with the Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy at Urban Arts Partnerships. All of these internships helped me a lot, not only academically and socially, but also artistically. Now I am a full-time student at the Pratt Institute with the dream of becoming a film director.

The Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy helped me decide on my college career. Before going to the Academy in early senior year, I was undecided on my major. After interning at the Academy, I realized that film was something that I want to do for the rest of my life as a professional career.  Peapod Adobe Youth Voices Academy was the only place where I took film classes. I came to the Pratt Institute with knowledge of using Adobe Premiere, and it really helped me for my early assignments in my digital cinema class.

Adjustments in Higher Education

Student Author: Eva Miller

Eva Miller is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Hayward, California. She participated in AYV at Tennyson High School in Hayward. Eva is currently studying Sociology and Communications at California State University, East Bay.

I am more than half way through my first quarter in college. And let me say, it has been an adjustment. For instance, parking is a nightmare, which all I have to compare it to is my high school, where few students drove. Also, in a normal week, I go to school three days out of seven. If you’re not really thinking how great this is, let me do it for you: I do not go to school more than I go to school. I am lucky for this because transitioning has (and I will say it again) been an adjustment.

Miller_1st post_photoAt my college, Cal State East Bay, they require all freshmen to be in a learning community, called clusters. My cluster is named Beats; I thought this would help when producing sound tracks and audio files for my films. A main class of the cluster is Audio Production. I am currently collaborating with a couple of my peers to create a song using audio software. The writing process amuses me as it is required. The song is completely satire and it has been a lot of fun putting it together. My group and I are almost done. Our other classmates have created hype about our song. I am eager to share it with my class.

As my college is in the same community as my home, it has not been hard staying connected with my community, my family, and my friends. I still volunteer and keep in contact with my AYV program (writing this blog post is reminding me to do that more).  Recently, I found out a local community center has an AYV program, and I am aggressively thinking about offering my hands and ideas. I wish I could say I have done more, but as I said before starting college has been an adjustment. And I like to think that once this quarter is over, I will be doing more projects. For example, my cousin has a band, and I will be making music videos for them. I will also be reaching out to my AYV site that has given me so much.

Until next time…

Design and Large-scale Systemic Integration in Education

locke hub P1AIn the past few years, design has taken a step into the limelight as a methodology and solution to some of the world’s most pressing problems. Specifically in education, there are good ideas out there – but what seems to be consistently lacking are relevant, and well executed solutions that can work on a systemic scale in public education.

In Los Angeles, No Right Brain Left Behind and Green Dot Public Schools have partnered up to create a system design to transform underused spaces and school libraries into 21st century learning environments. The system, or blue print, as we sometimes call it, involves spatial rejuvenation; curriculum co-development with STEM and literacy partners, teachers and students; curated programming; and strategies for community activation.

Over the course of the past year, the Locke Library Project has engaged over 50 design professionals - many of whom donated their time pro-bono, in the research, spatial design, programming, and community engagement phases. For efficiency and agility, we started lean, and formed a small but dedicated teacher group at Locke High, called the Beta Group. This group of trailblazers worked with our design teams to identify existing pain points and are currently co-creating solutions that are smart and cost effective for the space and programming design. The Beta Group of teachers will be the first to use the space with their students. The Locke High innovation space will be a hub that inspires new kinds of learning, thinking, and being, while building on the success Locke High and its students have experienced during Green Dot’s management.
Green Dot’s curriculum specialists are working hand in hand with 3rd party content developers to co-create curriculums aligned with the new Common Core and Next generation Science Standards. For example, we are currently co-creating a common core aligned STEM motor sports and physics curriculum with IndyCar race driver JR Hildebrand and his engineering team.

Spatially, we are dreaming up a new low-cost furniture system. Based on a well-designed modular core steel structure, this system will be configurable into desks, seating, bookshelves, tabletops and eventually lighting solutions that can be assembled quickly with ease. Ideally we’d like people to build on top of this framework, make it better, and relevant to their spaces and environments.

Our collaborative commitment is simple – to build the best possible human experiences to teach, learn, and develop in – for the schools, teachers, and students that need them the most. Effective design and innovation integration is at the core of that.

To learn more about the work of Green Dot Public Schools and No Right Brain Left Behind, please join a panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410. If you’re not attending SXSW EDU next week, you can follow the conversation @AdobeEdu.

Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation

SXSWedu imageTo address tomorrow’s complex challenges, we must prepare today’s students to be creators and innovators. They must learn to take risks, to iterate, to problem-solve, and to see and explore new possibilities. Creativity isn’t just the domain for artists but is required to solve scientific problems and to fuel the economies of the future.

Schools must provide all students with opportunities to develop these abilities. This requires examining curriculum, supporting teachers, and measuring student success beyond just high stakes testing. We love to see examples of amazing teachers and schools such as the Baltimore Design School, but know there is much more to be done to prepare this generation of students.

In collaboration with education and industry partners, Adobe is working to drive awareness and to call for providing opportunities for students to develop their creative muscles. At SXSW Education next week in Austin, Texas, we will host a panel called, “Creativity in Education: A Call for Transformation.” I am excited to speak with panelists such as Dale Dougherty (Maker Media), Cristina de Jesus (Green Dot Schools), and Erik Natzke (Adobe) to discuss how to foster and inspire creativity with this generation. We hope to see you there:

  1. Join us at SXSWedu. If you are attending this year’s SXSWedu conference, please join us for a conversation with a fantastic panel of experts on Tuesday, March 4 at 3 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center Ballroom G. We’re also hosting an informal Creativity Meet Up on Tuesday, March 4th from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Hilton Austin Downtown in Room 410.
  2. Join the conversation. Attend the SXSWedu panel or Creativity Meet Up and share your thoughts and comments using the hashtag #CreateEdu.

An Experience of a Maynoothian

Student Author: Delia Aires

Delia Aires is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Dublin, Ireland. She participated in AYV at the Blanchardstown Computer Clubhouse Foroige. Delia is currently studying Digital Media at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

This month has been one of the most inspiring, intriguing and exciting months of my life to date! Why? Because I’m in college, finally.

Since beginning University my eyes have been dramatically opened. It is a completely different world to the one I have been living in so far. For me, University is a place of freedom, friendship and the most important of all, learning. Before I arrived here, I expected it to be comprised of these components but never did I imagine how much they would be a part of college life. It is worlds away from Secondary school (High school) in that self-motivation is necessary. This instills great qualities within the individual, including responsibility.

The new friendships I have made already have been eye-opening. I have met all kinds of young people from all walks of life who, like myself, are eager to dive head first into the wonderful new adventure that is, college life and learning. I hope to not only learn from my lecturers, but from my peers also.

photo 2_survival guideLuckily, there are some amazing facilities in my University with access to Mac labs and TV studios nearby. Creativity is promoted. In fact, the leader of the student union, Mal Callan, thrust us into this creative environment from day one. For us incoming Freshers (First Years), he wrote a book named ‘The First Year Survival Guide’. This is not just an ordinary book though. The craftsmanship within it is pristine. It contains advice on how to be happy and healthy in college through humour. The sheer creativity and skill executed by Mal in this project has influenced my own creativity greatly. The true spirit of talent shines from it, which is helping and inspiring our college community for the better.

Speaking of creativity, I have recently completed working on and editing my first video project in Digital Media, the course I am doing. Although the process was long, I gained knowledge from it. Working with interesting and creative people allowed me to broaden my own creativity once more. I hope that this will continue throughout my life.

As this blog comes to a close, I must stress how grateful I am for this AYV scholarship. With it, I am thriving and gaining new information constantly through University. Without it, I would not be doing so. The main message this Adobe scholarship has embedded in my mind is that creativity and education combined can achieve a multitude of dreams and goals.

Introducing The Adobe Youth Voices Scholars Blog Series

Earlier this year, 25 highly talented Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) students were selected to receive scholarships to help them pursue higher education in a creative field. We are pleased to announce that the first group of scholarship recipients will be contributing blog posts sharing their experiences in post-secondary school and updating us on their creative projects. We hope these blogs will inspire current AYV students who dream about starting a creative career!

2013-2014 AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV students entering their first or second year of post-secondary school during the 2014-15 academic year are encouraged to apply for the scholarship here. Applications are being accepted until March 3, 2014.

The AYV Scholarships program is fully funded by Adobe and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE), an independent not-for-profit founded in 1919. IIE is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.

Please join us in congratulating the Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipients and check back for their blog posts!

USC Graduate Students Embrace Adobe Creative Cloud to Edit Thesis Film

Filmmaker Christopher Guerrero—soon to graduate—and Maury Shessel—already on his career path—both attended The University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts (SCA). Both video pros have tried various software programs and suites to edit and post-produce projects and they agree: Adobe Creative Cloud with an emphasis on Adobe Premiere Pro CC for editing gives them everything they need to create a box-office hit. They decided to edit Chris’s graduate thesis film, Mike Garcia and The Cruz, using Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and shared their thoughts about their exciting work-in-progress. Norman Hollyn, USC Endowed Chair in Editing and President of the University Film and Video Association, also weighs in on the choices available to students today.

USC 1USC 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobe: As graduate students from the renowned USC SCA, why did you choose Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit Christopher’s thesis? Guerrero: My first experience editing film was at UC Santa Cruz, where I learned to edit 8-millimeter film. Like a lot of folks in the industry, I graduated to non-linear editing and learned Final Cut Pro and Avid. I became somewhat of an editing guru and digital media specialist at UC Santa Cruz. When I went to USC, I was introduced to Premiere Pro and became addicted to its ability to ingest almost any raw camera format without transcoding and its integration with other Adobe programs like After Effects and Photoshop.

Shessel: In our first conversation, when Chris inquired if I would edit his thesis, we initially decided on Premiere Pro CC due to its flexibility. We did not want to wait forever for things to be ready to edit, and we wanted to shoot on the latest high-end digital cameras, including the Sony F5 and Sony F65. Our next thought was we didn’t have the most powerful computers, so we couldn’t afford a ton of RAM to transcode and start editing. When we started really putting Premiere Pro to the test, we were pleasantly surprised. We loved that we could bring in After Effects compositions or layers from Photoshop instantly. No more checking settings or dealing with alpha channels. As the first thesis project team at USC to use Premiere Pro, we’re really trying to innovate and show what can be done with the solution.

USC 3

Adobe: Professor Hollyn, is this a trend you’re starting to see with more of your students? Hollyn: At the School of Cinematic Arts, we’re always watching what’s happening with the NLEs. We want students to learn about all of the editing solutions available to them so they have more flexibility when they graduate. We’re beginning to see more interest in using Premiere Pro for projects. We’re moving toward a situation where in a couple of years the decision of which system to work with won’t be reserved just for thesis films, it will extend down further in curriculum, even to the undergraduate level.

I meet with every group before they start shooting their thesis projects. We talk about the story, their post-production schedule, and what tools they will be using. I recently met with another group whose film involves heavy visual effects and they asked specifically about using Premiere Pro because of its strong integration with After Effects. For Chris and Maury, I know they were really interested in being able to throw multiple formats on the Premiere Pro timeline without transcoding and the Dynamic Link capability between Premiere Pro and After Effects really piqued their interest. They also wanted to be the first to edit a thesis using an Adobe workflow. I like it when our students experiment with new stuff.

Adobe: What is the thesis film about, and how long is it? Guerrero: My Master’s thesis is a comedy. Not many comedies come out of USC. That’s something Maury and I have in common. Both our theses are comedic and we both love that genre. Adding to his immense talent, this was another reason I asked him to help me with my thesis.

The film is about a punk rock IT student. He’s an anarchist who steals the Chancellor’s laptop. Right now, it is 27 minutes, but Maury and I are working on cutting it down to 15 or 16 minutes. SCA’s high profile, annual student film festival, First Look, has strict guidelines about how long films can be. We’re anticipating that it’s going to be done in December 2013 or January 2014 and we hope it will premiere at the festival.

Adobe: What have you found most useful in Adobe Premiere Pro CC? Guerrero:  I’ve been working with Premiere Pro since version CS5, and I love its ability to support a ton of high-end graphics and seamlessly incorporate effects from After Effects. With the graphics card on my computer, I can throw 10 or more effects at the timeline through Dynamic Link, and I don’t have to wait around to render anything. Everything is elegant and ready to go without re-linking files or grabbing a hard drive. The simplicity is stunning. To me, after years of jumping around between software applications and transcoding and exporting files, that’s pretty insane.

USC 4

Adobe: What was the learning curve like for you, Maury? Shessel: I was trained on Avid, and worked on it most of my life. But with Premiere Pro, I was fluent almost instantaneously. The keystrokes were slightly different, but in two to three days, my muscle memory was going for the right keys.

Adobe: Can you describe some of the best parts of this experience? Shessel: As editors, we are always looking for the best tools. After using Premiere Pro, I can’t imagine not using it again. I tell people how great of a time I’m having with editing this thesis and how easy Premiere Pro is based on other software I’ve used.

Adobe: If you had advice to give to other students, what would it be? Guerrero: Choose Premiere Pro, and forget transcoding. I know from personal experience how grueling student deadlines are. We have 16 to 18 hours of class each week on top of all our other responsibilities. Take my advice: get from shooting to cutting ASAP.

Adobe: Professor Hollyn, what do you want students to know about the industry when they graduate? Hollyn: One of the best things we can do for our students is to try to future proof them. This doesn’t mean teaching them every editing program. We try to provide them with knowledge about not just what’s happening in 2013 but what may be happening in 2017. Of course, we can’t predict the future, but we can make sure they learn how to continue growing their skills. There will always be new technologies, distribution channels, and formats. We want students to be able to look for these changes, adapt, and even take advantage of the opportunities that these changes present.

Adobe: Maury, Christopher, what do you both foresee in the future? Guerrero: There’s an idea people have been throwing around for years, and that’s the democratization of filmmaking. There’s some truth in that. Now everyone has the tools. However, not everyone has the knowledge and creative alchemy and talent to bring all these elements—video, photos, and visual effects—together in a way that intrigues and excites audiences. Today and in the future, smaller teams will be able to create drastically higher quality productions through ingenuity and technologies. Ultimately, filmmaking is about problem solving. Adobe is providing far more tools to solve more problems, much faster. And that helps us create better, more gripping films with fewer resources.

Shessel: I think Premiere Pro is not just a tool, it’s more of an enabler of style, and I’m a worshipper of style, almost to a fault. Over the decades, distinct styles have emerged based on whether people edit on a Moviola or on film, or using non-linear editing tools.  Now, with the ease of integration among Creative Cloud components, including After Effects, Illustrator, and Photoshop, I think a new style may emerge as creative barriers are knocked down. So I’m watching closely.

Learn more about the video apps and services in Adobe Creative Cloud.

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Oakland School for the Arts Students Create with Meaning

HallwayGallery

Last week I had the pleasure of visiting the Oakland School for the Arts (OSA) in California. OSA was founded in 2002 and is a public charter school with just over 600 students in grades 6 through 12. In addition to rigorous academics, each student specializes in one of the following disciplines: circus arts, dance, digital media, instrumental music, figure skating, literary arts, production design, theatre, visual arts, or vocal music. It was wonderful to walk the hallways of OSA and pass dance studios, music studios, art studios, biology and Spanish classrooms. I saw students wearing leotards, toting instrument cases (sometimes larger than the students themselves), sketching in notebooks, getting feedback on the latest apparel they designed, taking photos, and singing. The halls were buzzing with much more than just talent– there was so much student creativity, energy, and passion!

The day I visited coincided with the Digital Media class’ Framing Day. Framing Day is the day when students frame and hang their recently completed work. In this case, students were hanging their posters celebrating each of the 30 articles of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The posters were created in AdobePhotoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign because Heidi Cregge, chair and instructor of Digital Media, uses this assignment to teach students about how these three programs work together and can be used in an integrated way.

Students’ posters were very impressive! Each one intrigued, provoked, and drew in the audience. As always, young people never fail to amaze me with their creativity and passion for making our world a better place. Check-out some of their work below and on their slideshow.

Izzy   domenico

Izzy and Domenico with their posters

 

robin   ryan

Robin and Ryan with their posters

 

emilio   2 students w frames

Emilio with his poster (co-created with Ciaran) & Izzy and Takai after hanging posters.

Preparing Students for a Creative Career

CosmopointMalaysian institutions of higher learning, Kuala Lumpur Metropolitan University College (KLMUC) and Cosmopoint College of Technology, bring leading-edge creative technology to more than 3,000 students in the nation’s largest educational implementation of Adobe Creative Cloud to date.

Once completed, KLMUC and the entire enrolment of students in 11 Cosmopoint education centers will use Adobe Creative Cloud applications in their computer labs and have full access to solutions such as Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, as well as Adobe Muse CC, giving them the opportunity to develop skillsets like post-processing, graphic design and desktop publishing. Lecturers will also be revamping their curricula to incorporate more industry relevant projects and challenging learners to think outside the box.

The creative industry is evolving at a rapid pace, continually stretching the limits of innovation and technology. By implementing Adobe Creative Cloud, students will have access to up-to-date industry standard software, giving them a competitive edge when entering the workforce. Adobe is proud to partner with KLMUC and Cosmopoint to help nurture creative talent and better prepare students for future success.

Meet the 2013 AYV Aspire Award Winners

At Adobe, we believe creativity is a key to educational success for today’s youth. For this reason, I’m honored to be involved in our Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) program and thrilled to announce the winners of our second annual AYV Aspire Awards competition, an online challenge that invites youth from all around the world to tap into their creativity and share their vision for change in local communities

The winning projects, now featured on the AYV website, are prime examples of how powerfully young people are able to express themselves when provided with the right resources. Following are a just few of the remarkable entries.

AYV1

Life’s a Fight

Created by four talented youth from the Appalachian Media Institute, “Life’s a Fight” documents the issue of teenage bullying and explores how the social landscape now extends beyond the schoolyard, to the internet. In this short documentary film we hear stories from teachers, parents, and victims, and learn from a group of local teens who saw an opportunity to take a stand.

AYV2

It Makes a Big Difference

Produced by Jeanviêr Janga, who leads a media team at the Bonaire Youth Outreach Foundation, this project addresses the ability of youth to change their communities one act of kindness at a time. Jeanviêr used Adobe tools to create a fun and creative animation which promotes the idea that each small act of kindness is a step toward a better world. Jeanviêr joined the AYV program in 2011 and won an Audience Choice award in last year’s Aspire Awards competition.

AYV3Bowing Down to the Earth

This piece, created by Agata Mroczek, a Polish student with a passion for photography and environmental protection, celebrates “Earth Hour” as an opportunity to unite and give the Earth an hour of rest. “Earth Hour,” an event started by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), has been nine years in the making and takes place annually in Poland. Agata’s photos portray his event through the eyes of a young person.

This year, participation in the competition exceeded our expectations with an astounding 1,100 participants from 51 countries. In addition, entries received more than 830,000 votes from fans who selected their favorites to win the Audience Choice award. By utilizing a mix of storytelling formats, participants, like those shared above, address complex social and environmental topics, including bullying and climate change. While their entries represent a diverse range of ideas, they’re unified by a focus on finding solutions to the issues addressed.

Each Aspire Award participant gained important creative skills including media making, self-expression, ideation and collaboration. We believe this creativity skill set will help youth become more deeply engaged in their education in the short term and better prepared to succeed in an always evolving global economy in the long term. I encourage you to visit the AYV website and explore our digital gallery featuring each of this year’s extraordinary winners. I also invite you to learn more about our broader AYV program and explore opportunities to get involved. At Adobe, we know that by working together we can help build a bright and creative future for the next generation.

About this blog

Adobe

Welcome to Adobe Featured Blogs, a one-stop information and conversation destination for virtually anyone interested in what's going on at Adobe. Here you'll find the latest company and product news from Adobe's multiple lines of business. We value your perspective and encourage comments that are on-topic and add value but that do not spam, denigrate or offend. Read more