Adobe Creative Cloud

Connected Assets Improve Productivity by 700%

You already know that your brand can use design as a competitive advantage. What you might not know is that Creative Cloud Libraries allow users to store and share assets across their Creative Cloud desktop and mobile applications. The Libraries panel appears in nearly all of the Creative Cloud desktop apps and stores not only commonly-used files, but also creative assets like brushes, character styles, 3D characters and more. These libraries can quickly be shared with other Creative Cloud users, allowing for fast collaboration and access to their connected assets anytime, anywhere.

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Creatives save considerable time using CC Libraries according to the new Pfeiffer Report “Adobe Creative Cloud Libraries: The Productivity Impact of Shared Assets and Settings.” Finding the right brand asset and making sure it’s the most recent version tends to consume significant time for nearly all creatives. Pfeiffer found a 7x productivity gain using Creative Cloud Libraries versus other manual approaches. Applying a brand-approved color swatch, for example, takes 16 seconds rather than over 2 minutes.

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One great use case for Creative Cloud Libraries is a style guide. Here’s an example of Adobe’s Brand Guidelines and a Creative Cloud Library created to include some of those brand assets:

CC Libraries

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Join the discussion

  • By Michael W. Perry - 9:45 AM on May 7, 2016  

    Sigh, I feel like a broken record. How about a way to share text as a connected asset, with or without basic formatting? The ad copy that accompanies a picture should be as easy to edit and review as the picture itself. It’s a pain to have to enter it manually or to cut-and-paste from some non-CC app. And having it update when changed much like a Photoshop image would be handy too.

  • By Vanessa Hahn - 10:49 AM on May 17, 2016  

    Michael, Adobe InCopy has many of those features and it integrates into Adobe InDesign. It’s created specifically so various design members can edit text and track changes much like Microsoft Word but with story mode, galley mode and layout mode. I get it as part of my subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud. (I don’t work for Adobe…just love their products.)