Adobe Creative Cloud

From Shoot to Sale: Part 1

Buyers’ preferences change with the market and time, and we’re seeing an increasing demand for authentic and diverse lifestyle imagery. You don’t need to hire models or professional make up artists to produce beautiful, commercially successful images, but if you’re up for the challenge of putting together a professional set, there are few things you should keep in mind to get the most from your shoot.

Mat Hayward, Adobe Stock Contributor Relations Specialist, is an accomplished event and stock photographer. In this two-part tutorial, Mat walks us through a photoshoot he set up in this hometown Seattle and shares his tips for successful lifestyle images, from shoot to submission.

To prepare for your shoot, make sure all of your models sign releases. Without signed permission, you cannot sell your images as stock. If you are photographing recognizable buildings or landmarks, you may also need a property release. You can find release templates on our HelpX page or on the Contributor Portal.

It’s important to approach your photoshoot with a plan. Be prepared with a shot list, but take the opportunities as they rise to improvise.

Natural interaction and chemistry between your models is key for lifestyle imagery. Buyers are looking for photos that are believable and relatable for their audience. Set up the scene so you can tell a story, and ask your models to interact and capture the scene as it unfolds. If you are shooting food, prepare the food in advance, but let models complete the food presentation for those authentic moments that buyers are looking for.

In summary:

  • Create a shot list in advance to keep you on track, but don’t be afraid to improvise when the opportunities arise.
  • Get model and property releases for any recognizable people and properties.
  • Tape over any trademarks and logos, or make sure to retouch them in post-processing.
  • Set up the scene and re-shoot from multiple angles.
  • Let your models interact with each other to get authentic moments rather than static, posed shots.

In part two, Mat will walk through the submission process to Adobe Stock, including how to upload content seamlessly from desktop apps you are already using to edit your photos. He’ll also share his best tips for keywording your images so buyers can find your photos in our collection.

In the meantime, check out more images from the shoot in Mat’s Adobe Stock portfolio.

Adobe Stock, Adobe Stock Contributors, Photography