Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Creative Cloud Complete Plan—Pro Video Tools 40% Off

Save 40% on all the video tools you need with the Adobe Creative Cloud Complete plan.

Just US$29.99/month. Join now.

All video professionals worldwide—including Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Grass Valley Edius and Adobe Creative Suite users—can get every Adobe creative tool for 40% off on the Creative Cloud Complete plan.
 
Join by May 29, 2015 and get your first year of membership for just US$29.99 a month*—a savings of 40%. Sign up now!

Creative Cloud brings together everything editors, filmmakers, animators, and motion graphics designers need to go from script to screen and beyond. Move projects seamlessly through your production pipeline thanks to deep integration between Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe Audition CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. With apps that play well together, you can fine-tune your edits, audio, color grades, and masks in one integrated workflow. Plus, you always have instant access to new features as soon as they’re released, so you can stay up to speed on the latest innovations, industry developments, and new hardware and formats.

Making the move to Adobe Premiere Pro CC
Edit video with greater speed and precision with Premiere Pro CC, the industry-leading nonlinear editing application. Offering a clean, easily customizable interface and native support for a huge range of file formats, Premiere Pro CC lets you move through projects faster and deliver your best work, even on the tightest deadlines. There are so many reasons to upgrade or switch to Premiere Pro CC and now, through May 29, 2015, we’re adding one more! Our best offer yet saves you 40% on the Creative Cloud Complete plan. Sign up now!

When you subscribe to Creative Cloud today, you will get the new features as soon as they’re available. In Premiere Pro CC, you’ll get the Lumetri Color Panel, which allows editors to manipulate color and light with familiar Lightroom-style controls, Morph Cut, which removes unsightly jump-cuts in talking head interview footage, and Creative Cloud Libraries, which gives you access to your creative assets, including looks and graphics, wherever you are.

To see what else is coming soon to the video tools in Creative Cloud, check out our blog post.


Late Night with Seth Meyers
Dan Dome, associate director and lead editor for Late Night with Seth Meyers has a long history in late night television. Dome recently transitioned from leading the post helm at CONAN where they were formally cutting on Apple Final Cut Pro, to launch Late Night on Premiere Pro CC and a full Creative Cloud workflow. Check out how he and his team use Adobe Creative Cloud.

Resources to help you make the switch
We’re dedicated to making sure you do not lose any hours learning a new piece of software. On our website, we’ve captured the tools you need to help you make the switch from Apple Final Cut Pro or Avid Media Composer to Adobe Premiere Pro CC. You can also download a free 30 day trial of Premiere Pro CC.
 
 
* Terms and Conditions: The $29.99/month offer for an annual Adobe Creative Cloud Complete Membership is only available to customers who own Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Grass Valley Edius or customers who purchased an Adobe Creative Suite edition or individual product in one of the following versions (CS3.x, CS4, or CS5.x, or CS6) directly from the Adobe Store or by calling a regional Adobe Call Center. Offer valid for purchases of an annual plan, which requires a 12-month contract. These offers are not available to Education, OEM, or volume licensing customers. This offer is valid from April 9, 2015 12:01 a.m. ET through May 29, 2015 11:59 p.m. ET. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED BY LAW. For a limited time stated in this promotion, eligible customers may purchase an annual membership to Adobe Creative Cloud for a reduced price. Residents of embargoed countries are not eligible. This offer is limited to one (1) purchase of one (1) Creative Cloud annual membership per customer. Offer is subject to U.S. export control laws and laws where the recipient resides. Offer may not be assigned, exchanged, sold, transferred, or combined with any other discount or offer, or redeemed for cash or other goods and services. Offer expires at the time stated in this promotion. This offer and prices are subject to change without notice.

8:09 AM Permalink

From Critique to Collaboration: The Creation of Adobe Comp CC

Scott Belsky and Khoi Vinh‘s friendship precedes Scott’s tenure at Adobe, so when Scott approached him with an invitation to collaborate, it didn’t take long for Khoi to accept. In fact, in some ways, the collaboration, between the co-founder of Behance and VP at Adobe and the former design director of the New York Times, seemed pre-destined.

Since its introduction, Khoi had been touting the merits of the iPad as a creative tool: “I’ve always seen it as a really capable piece of hardware that at the same time imposes some really wonderful constraints. When you’re using your finger to manipulate things, you lose a sort of fine-grained ability to ‘get things absolutely perfect.’ I’ve always looked at that as a benefit.” He didn’t know it at the time, but the iPad environment he felt so strongly about (the one that forces people to focus on concept rather than execution) would become the foundation for Adobe Comp CC.

But it wasn’t Khoi’s appreciation of the iPad, or the fact that he’d built an app called Mixel in 2011, that prompted Scott to call him in the fall of 2013. It was, instead, Khoi’s skepticism about Creative Cloud. Khoi summed up the reason for Scott’s call in a recent blog post: “The perception at that time was that a CC subscription was a scheme to allow Adobe to charge repeatedly for software that previously users could buy just once. That’s what he wanted to discuss.”

From that conversation, things moved quickly forward.

By the end of 2013, Khoi was working as a consultant to Adobe with principal product manager Will Eisley and director of design Eric Snowden on what would become Comp CC. Khoi remembers, “Adobe assigned prototyping engineer Renaun Erickson to the project and for a couple of months it was just the two of us trying to figure out the fundamentals of the app, its basic concepts, what was important, what wasn’t.”

Critique_1Their ideas began taking shape when they realized that the key to the app’s success would be enabling people to get what’s in their heads onto the screen as quickly as possible. It meant they needed a “drawing engine.” One that would enable people to draw, move things around, and resize them—with familiar touch-screen gestures. Khoi explained it like this: “With Comp CC, you don’t access a different tool to get a box or crop a picture or create a block of text; you draw a box with an X in it and get a picture object into which you can put an image and crop it, or you draw several horizontal lines to generate a block of text. It’s much more natural. It’s much faster. And, most importantly, it’s much different than working on desktop software.”

Critique_2They intentionally kept the build media agnostic and with a focus on brainstorming. The canvases are familiar, but they are blank; there are no tools for pagination or trapping ink, and no library of interface widgets or pulldown menus. Because it keeps the focus on rapid-fire iteration, it’s a welcoming tool for conceptualizing juxtapositions of type and image for any medium.

It wasn’t long before it was time to share the build with an audience.

When Khoi presented during Sneaks at Adobe MAX 2014, the application was about 60% done. He remembers, “Not all the gestures were in there, the history feature was still pretty fragile, and as far as exporting to the desktop apps, I think only InDesign CC worked at that time.”

By the end of 2014, however, Comp CC’s two most important features were in place.

The ability to export files to Adobe’s primary desktop design applications makes Comp CC a powerful addition to an ingrained workflow. Many mobile apps have great approaches to creative exploration, they’re just not as attuned to a designer’s needs. Khoi believes that’s Comp CC’s game-changing feature: “We put a lot of emphasis on building those bridges to Illustrator CC, InDesign CC and Photoshop CC; I’m willing to bet that the bridges we created, to what designers already use and what they’re comfortable with, will be really powerful for people.”

As for the history feature that saves every iteration of every layout… it’s the team’s acknowledgement that ideas flow continuously. People don’t come up with one idea, jot it down and move on to the next one. But since any need to “manage” brainstorming sessions runs counter to the course of creativity, the saved history relieves, entirely, the burden of worry about preserving concepts, while also giving people the ability to scroll back in time—maybe even to the point of rediscovery. (Note: The feature is demoed in Khoi’s Sneaks video beginning at 3:40) A similar history scrub feature, already in Adobe Photoshop Sketch and Adobe Illustrator Line, provided the perfect interface but Khoi mentioned a characteristic unique to Comp CC: “You can actually go back and mess around with something you worked on 20 minutes ago but then whatever you did between then and now is preserved (you won’t lose it just because you elaborated on something).”

That’s the condensed version of the Khoi Vinh-Adobe partnership and the launch of Comp CC.

Now that Comp CC is in the hands of the creative community, Khoi knows the collaboration isn’t over, “For it to succeed and for us to effect meaningful change to ingrained workflows, we have to listen to feedback and understand how people are using it.”

And about Khoi’s skepticism of Creative Cloud… it, ultimately, fell away: “It wasn’t until I collaborated on Comp CC that I truly understood why Adobe made this huge move to Creative Cloud. It’s not about ‘renting’ software that we used to buy; it’s about a connected ecosystem of tools that’s only possible with the cloud. I was won over to the strategy.”

9:04 AM Permalink

Adobe Stretches the Creative Canvas to Apple Watch with Three New Apps

Imagine if you could channel all the creative productivity lost from checking your phone hundreds of times a day into a new project—what would you create? The arrival of the Apple Watch, and the ability to prioritize and customize alerts, signals a shift in how we’ll interact with personal technology.

We certainly expect Adobe customers—some of the most creative people on the planet—to be early adopters of the Apple Watch. That’s because designers get a lot of their best ideas not while sitting at our desks, but from interacting with and observing the world around us. Geoff Dowd, our director of experience design, made this point in a recent New York Times article. When Geoff has a few spare minutes, he hops on his bike and takes in the vibrant district around Adobe’s San Francisco design studio.

This is Adobe’s mission: to stretch the mobile canvas and inspire creatives. So today we updated three of our popular iPhone apps to add support for Apple Watch: Behance, Adobe Color CC, and Creative Cloud. The intersection of Creative Cloud and wearable technology has arrived:

Watch_1.BehanceStatsPrioritize projects with Behance: Whether you’re with a client or away from your desk—customize Behance notifications so that a glance displays your most meaningful daily stats. Behance is the world’s leading creative community, where you can get feedback and find inspiration from over five million creative peers.

iOS 8 iPhone 6The new release of Behance app for iPhone makes interaction with critical updates frictionless, bringing your Inbox, Notifications, My Work, and Nearby directly to your Apple Watch. Remotely control Airplay presentations of your online portfolio from your watch to open a Behance project and step through the individual images of a project presentation. Use Handoff to move seamlessly from your Apple Watch to your iPhone when you want to comment on a file or project; use the share dialog to post a link to Facebook, Twitter and other services.

Watch_3.ColorTheme

Get out there… and make something colorful: The always-on culture has often meant we miss those precious moments of inspiration and ideating around us. With Adobe Color CC, see the world in a spectrum of color, wherever your inspiration takes you. Pair the app with your Apple Watch and turn on geo-location to reveal color themes that were captured nearby. Discover the colors in the world around you—view the theme, name, distance, and map location.
Watch_4.ColorSaveSwipe to see the ten most popular themes in the vicinity. Extend your mobile and desktop workflows by adding new color swatches to your Creative Cloud Libraries design assets as-is, or pass one to your iPhone for real-time adjustments. And this is all available back at your desk, thanks to your unique Creative Profile, so you can continue working in CC desktop tools.

Watch_5.CCWatchWear Adobe Creative Cloud on your wrist: Many folks have asked us about the update for Creative Cloud app for iPhone, that Apple shows on the Watch TV commercial—it’s now here! Gone are the days of being chained to your desk or phone constantly monitoring for client feedback, new projects, design assets and more; set up Apple Watch to monitor activity on shared Creative Cloud files, view and reply to comments on a file, accept or decline invitations to collaborate, and more. The effortless mobile to desktop workflows across devices and apps enabled by Creative Profile and Creative Cloud Libraries make this all possible.

We’re looking forward to seeing the Apple Watch journey unfold—you can be sure that the first generation is just the start of amazing things to come. Similar to our other recent platform explorations Adobe Ink & Slide and our touch work on Microsoft Surface, how customers interact with Apple Watch will guide us. We can’t wait to hear where you take your newfound freedom. Anything is possible—get out there.

Check out these new apps:

 
Follow David Macy on Twitter.

11:00 AM Permalink

Announcing A Major New Update to The Creative Cloud Photography Plan

Starting today, with the release of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC 2015 and updates to all our mobile apps, the Adobe Creative Cloud Photography plan now, more than ever, makes it possible to enjoy your passion for photography anytime you want.

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With the Creative Cloud Photography plan, capture any moment and make it your own

Perfect your photography with Lightroom CC and Adobe Photoshop CC, the best photography tools whether you’re a beginner or a pro. Organize, edit, enhance and transform your photos anytime, anywhere. Sync your images across all your devices—Mac, PC and mobile. It’s all your photography, all in one place.
 

Lightroom CC

Lightroom CC is the standard for photo enthusiasts and professionals, and essential for perfecting photos. What’s new?

  • HDR Merge: Easily combine multiple high-contrast shots into a single HDR image.
  • Panorama Merge: Stitch together a group of photos to form a seamless panorama.
  • Facial Recognition: Identify a face in a photo and effortlessly find the same face in a library of images.
  • Performance Improvements: Get more done, faster. Lightroom takes advantage of compatible graphics processors to boost overall speed up to ten times faster, especially in the Develop module.
  • Filter Brush: Erase parts of a gradient or paint gradient effects into any part of a photo.
  • Advanced Video Slideshows: Combine still images, video and music with professional effects like pan and zoom.

CCPP_2

Lightroom for mobile devices

Automatically synced with Lightroom CC on the desktop, Adobe Lightroom for mobile lets you edit, organize and share photos on-the-go, on iOS and Android devices.

  • Android Tablet Support: Previously only available on Android phones, now you can sync, edit, organize and share on Android tablets too.
  • Android SD Card Support: You can now specify local storage to an SD card rather than internal device storage.
  • Native DNG Support on Android: Android 5.0 (aka “Lollipop”) now allows you to shoot photos in raw, and saves them as DNG files. You can now import those DNG files directly from you Android device.
  • Improved Crop Experience on iOS: We simplified the number of tiles in our crop UI so you can now easily find aspect ratios, and we added an auto-straighten function.

Sharing and storytelling

Stories are easy to tell with photos from any Lightroom collection using our free iPad apps Adobe Slate and Adobe Voice.
 

Read all the details about what’s new in Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography plan on the Photoshop.com and Lightroom Journal blogs.

The Creative Cloud Photography plan (USD$9.99 per month) includes Lightroom for your desktop, web and mobile, Photoshop CC and Photoshop Mix (for iPhone and iPad).

The products in the Creative Cloud Photography plan are also available as part of a Creative Cloud complete plan. Haven’t tried Creative Cloud yet? You should. For free.

9:25 AM Permalink

Marcus Thomas LLC, A Creative Union

An agency, with a long history of using Adobe creative software for all of its marketing and PR creative work, makes the move from Adobe Creative Suite to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams.

Marcus_1

Marcus Thomas LLC is the product of a union between two of Northeast Ohio’s oldest and largest independent advertising and public relations firms: Marcus Advertising, founded in Cleveland in 1946; and Ira Thomas Associates, founded in Youngstown in 1937. With decades of experience, Marcus Thomas recognized the importance of digital spaces early on and transformed into the fully integrated marketing agency it is today.

By upgrading to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, the agency simplifies licensing management while providing designers with access to a wider range of Adobe creative software.

“Our clients are on the latest software and it’s important that we are too. Working with Adobe Creative Cloud for teams keeps everyone on the same software version, from incoming interns to freelancers and clients,” says Amy Gressell, digital asset and creative systems manager at Marcus Thomas. “This eliminates the extra work that comes from constantly converting files and trying to manage multiple versions of software in house.”

Marcus_2

Opening doors to creativity

The Creative Cloud Packager also makes it easy for Gressell to package products and updates for designers depending on their software needs. For most of the active Creative Cloud for teams users at Marcus Thomas, Gressell delivers a standard package of applications including Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC. Those working with website design also use Adobe Flash Professional CC and Adobe Dreamweaver CC, while video editors work with Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

People don’t have time to learn something entirely new every time they want to use new software, so we appreciate the usability and consistency of the Adobe user interface across applications,” says Gressell. “Not only does it help our designers transition to new versions of software, but it also gives people a starting point when they want to experiment with other software.”

Marcus_3Web designers are starting to work with Adobe Muse CC to develop advanced website designs in a visual interface, while many designers have added Adobe Photoshop Lightroom to their workflows for its range of fast and simple photography editing features.

“We previously only offered a limited number of products to our design teams because it was too costly to buy separate full Creative Suite Master Collection licenses,” says Gressell. “The range of software in Adobe Creative Cloud for teams gives our designers a chance to experiment with new workflows to produce more creative work and meet our clients’ high standards.”

Read the Marcus Thomas LLC case study.

10:38 AM Permalink

Bonnie Siegler Answers Design’s Tough Questions

In the fall of 2014 Bonnie Siegler, joined us for a Working Late event at Makeshift Society in Brooklyn. Next week she’ll be back at Makeshift Society for a special night of cocktails, questions, and business advice.

 
DearBonnie_1

As an extension of her column “Dear Bonnie,” on Design Observer, Bonnie will be taking questions from the audience about how to succeed in the design industry while keeping your sanity.

Bonnie’s background is in both the academic and business worlds, providing her with a wealth of knowledge about best practices for designers. She’s the founder of Eight and a Half, a multidisciplinary design studio based in New York, and before that was the co-founder of Number Seventeen. She served as the chair of the 2013 AIGA Design Conference and created and produced Command X, a live competition featuring up-and-coming designers, that’s been a component of the last four of AIGA’s national conferences.

Bonnie’s work is in the permanent design archives of AIGA and has been recognized by the Art Directors Club, Type Directors Club, and the Society of Publication Design. She got her degree at Carnegie Mellon University, has taught in the graduate design programs at Yale, RISD, and the School of Visual Arts, and was the 2014 Koopman Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts at the University of Hartford.

Get a ticket, submit a question (anonymously of course), and join us Tuesday April 21 for Dear Bonnie; we’ll have food and drinks and Bonnie Siegler will have answers to the tough professional, social, and ethical design-related dilemmas.

7:37 AM Permalink

What about Android?

An update on mobile support.

Our vision for our mobile apps is to push the boundaries of where and how you can create. Whether you’re capturing inspiration on the go, sketching your ideas on the fly or compositing photos, these mobile apps are fundamentally connected by your Creative Profile and help make your graphics, colors, brushes available to you as you move from app to app and from your phone to desktop.

While we initially launched these apps on iOS, we didn’t forget you Android. We’re working hard to develop Android phone support for some of our most popular apps. But we want to do it right, in a way that complements the strengths of the Android user experience and design. While we can’t offer specific release dates, you should expect to see the first of these apps starting in Summer 2015.

We’re also eagerly developing an Android version of the Creative SDK, which powers both Adobe and third-party apps. This SDK will allow the creation of more Android apps that connect you to your Creative Profile wherever you are.

As of now, there are Android phone apps available for the creative social network Behance, Behance Creative Portfolio, Creative Cloud file management, and Lightroom.

 

Can’t wait to get your hands on Creative Cloud mobile apps for Android? Interested in helping us test them? Check into joining our Android beta program.


8:44 AM Permalink

Collaborate Using Creative Cloud Assets

At its heart, Creative Cloud is all about collaboration. It brings different creative professionals—designers, illustrators, video artists, web developers, and others—together and helps them work efficiently and spend more time being creative.

Collaboration_1

Sharing folders and Libraries; two primary ways to collaborate using Creative Cloud.

Collaborate with files

Real projects are seldom single files. Even the simplest project has multiple design assets: documents, fonts, graphics, illustrations, and so many more. Also, it seldom happens that you’re working in isolation. In the real world, you need to collaborate with other creatives, service providers, vendors, and, of course, customers.

Collaboration_2 You can use Creative Cloud Assets to collaborate on single files or a folder of files. All collaborators then have access to the actual files that they can view and work on. This collaboration greatly reduces the work of “zipping” files and folders and then having to keep track of the various versions. All collaborators synchronize these files on their computers; Creative Cloud for desktop app keeps all files in sync and makes sure that everyone has the latest and greatest copy.

Collaborate with Libraries

Creative Cloud Libraries are collections of creative assets and design elements that you can use across Adobe desktop and mobile applications. When you share a library, collaborators can contribute assets to it. Libraries are a great way of organizing team-level assets and artifacts, and maintaining consistency across large projects.

Once ready, you can share the library with other members of your team, so that everyone is using the same approved assets. Use Libraries to quickly transfer design assets across your team for use in a growing list of supported apps on both mobile and desktop. Your team can then work on projects whenever they feel inspired. You won’t have to worry about stray versions of assets and can rest assured that all deliverables adhere to and use the correct design elements.

Collaboration_3 You can invite someone to share files and Libraries using the Creative Cloud website or from within the Creative Cloud desktop applications that support this feature. At the time of writing this blog post, Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and Adobe InDesign CC are the Creative Cloud desktop apps that support library collaboration. In addition, you can access and use library assets from within several Adobe mobile apps. Collaborators are authenticated using their Adobe ID or Enterprise ID. If some collaborators don’t already have an Adobe ID, they’re given the opportunity to create one.

Useful resources

Looking for more information on collaboration in Creative Cloud? Check this list:

 

That’s our perspective on Creative Cloud collaboration; let us know how you’re using these features in your workflows.

7:46 AM Permalink

An Online Portfolio: Your Professional Story

The ninth (and final) installment of I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015… And all I brought back is a series of blog posts, the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee.

Promoting Your Creative Work on the Web with Roxanne Schwartz

Behance_2 For those who don’t know, Behance is the leading platform for sharing and discovering creative work. The numbers on the left offer up the number one advantage of posting work on Behance… Exposure. More than 200 million page views each month of exposure.

Not only does Behance have free online portfolios, it’s also the bones of ProSite, a customizable website builder that enables people to use custom domain names and easily sync Behance projects to it. What a lot of people don’t know is that ProSite is included with a Creative Cloud subscription (and the integration makes it super easy to share work).

Roxanne, a community manager at Behance, has seen thousands of web portfolios. She knows what works and what doesn’t when it comes to showcasing creative work online. She had some good ideas about how to think about this hugely important promotional tool.

Behance_1

Portfolios and profiles (words used interchangeably throughout this post) are always-on creative showcases. Make sure they represent you well when people stop to look:


  • Let the work take center stage. Viewers spend only a few seconds looking through portfolios. Make sure yours is easy to scan and that the work is the center of attention. Cluttered portfolios are frequently over-compensating for mediocre work.
  • Behance_3 Curate your best work. There’s truth to the saying: You’re only as good as your last project and your portfolio is only as good as your worst image. A few great images are better than a lot that are just okay. If there’s something you’re not proud of, leave it out.
  • Use eye-catching images. People have very short attention spans so catch their eye and keep them interested. Make sure that images are large, clear, and consistently sized. And remember, this isn’t a client hand off, it’s a portfolio… Be selective. It’s not necessary to show everything.
  • Share the backstory. Don’t be afraid to show process—from early sketches to finished work. People love knowing how and why things were done. Offer up details.
  • Highlight things that give you an edge. Don’t be afraid to mention awards, accomplishments, or testimonials.
  • Keep your portfolio fresh. This is a living, breathing document so resist the temptation to bulk it out with old or irrelevant work. The best portfolios are current portfolios.
  • Keep in touch. Make sure your contact information is up-to-date and easy to find. And add social accounts; email isn’t the only way to reach people.
  • Tell a story about yourself. Stories are more interesting than a list of past jobs. Spend some time thinking about how to represent yourself and your work with words.
  • Give credit where credit is due. Worked with a team? Don’t overstate your role and give credit to everyone who worked on the project with you. People appreciate being publicly acknowledged and giving credit where it’s due will ALWAYS make you look good.
  • Get feedback. Make sure your portfolio is ready to share with the world. Other people’s impressions are extremely valuable; ask friends and colleagues for critiques.
  • Share personal work alongside client work. It shows passion, commitment, and the ability to self-start.
  • Make your profile part of your project process. Working on a project? Set aside some favorite images to include in your portfolio. Once the project ends, documenting the process will be a snap.
  • Promote your work. Sharing isn’t bragging. Pick two or three social channels, connect them to your portfolio and share. Maintain an active presence, and respond to people when they comment.
  • Follow people who inspire you. Be thoughtful about the people you follow; it’s not only daily inspiration but a great way to build the foundation of a creative network. And don’t forget to network in person at local events.

A final four. Questions to ask yourself about your online profile/portfolio:

  • Can people easily find and view your work?
  • Does it represent you well?
  • Have you gotten feedback from friends/coworkers?
  • Do you have a plan to review and edit it?

My Conclusion (Roxanne summed it up nicely for me):

Behance_4
 
Read the wrap-up of Session 8: The Art of Making (Great) Videos with Dave Werner

7:33 AM Permalink

The Art of Making (Great) Videos

The penultimate installment of I Went to Adobe Creative Camp at SXSW 2015… And all I brought back is a series of blog posts, the firsthand account of a first-time Adobe SXSW Creative Camp attendee.

Make Social Media POP! with Video with Dave Werner

It’s easy enough to agree on the persuasive power of video, but how to actually make one? Dave didn’t have enough time to dive deep into his process, but he shared what he’s learned over the years—usually by doing the completely wrong thing and learning from his mistakes.

SocialVideo_1 When something moves, it catches the eye. And when someone tells a good story, there’s momentum. Photos and books tell stories for the eyes, but they’re static and silent; songs tell stories for the ears, with the element of time, with no visuals…

“Video combines the visuals of a photo (moving at 24fps), the storytelling of a book (being told through dialogue, acting and cinematography), and the forward momentum of music.”

 

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Take it up a notch

“Ninety-five percent of people are just going to shoot with an iPhone; your videos will really start to stand out and you’ll start to differentiate yourself if you develop a vocabulary of techniques.”

  • Edit ruthlessly. It takes a lot of time to pull-together a compelling video. Dave’s five-minute intro took him five days to make and he watched it over 50 times—changing bits at a time.
  • Overlay B-Roll. Particularly good for videos of people talking for long periods, Camera A focuses on whatever’s driving the main narrative and Camera B shoots action that amplifies it, then the B-Roll shots are overlaid to keep the video visually interesting. (Dave used the technique every two or three seconds in his intro video.)
  • Have a rough plan. I know when I get really excited about a project, I just want to jump up grab my camera, and shoot. But videos turn out better with planning. Then again, improvisation works too: The “tripod” Dave used for his intro video? A chair, with a cardboard box, a food storage bowl, and a tissue box… with his iPhone perched on top of it all.
  • Refine audio. Someone could have the flashiest, best looking video in the world, and if the talking begins and it’s impossible to hear… it’s a fail. Quite simply: There are a lot of tools to help make voices loud and clear. Use them.
  • Add a look. There are people in Hollywood whose jobs are to work on the color of films. So it’s probably worth it to spend just a few minutes on it; shadows, highlights, saturation create an enormous visual payoff.
  • Don’t use canned titles. Don’t use terrible fonts, drop shadows, or funky animation. Typography is every bit as important as actors. Get creative: a sticky note with writing, chalk on a sidewalk, sketches on napkins, magnetic letters, anything that connects to the theme of a video
  • Add explosions. OK, so it’s probably not necessary to add explosions to everything, but they do help keep things interesting. That’s the beauty of special effects: They aren’t expected. All of a sudden things just start exploding.
  • End with a call to action. Don’t lose people when the credits roll. Never finish with “The End,” always give interested viewers a next step.
  • Always tell a story. Add a narrative layer that takes people through the entire video. There’s a reason why people tell stories. They’re easier to remember. Don’t need a story? Try one anyway.
  • Learn from the masters. Developing an eye for video means getting inspired by every. other. video. everywhere. Emulate things that look cool. Try everything.

 

Sharing with the world

Dave recently released a three-minute cover of the Sesame Street classic I Don’t Want To Live on The Moon. It took him about nine months to complete, was filmed entirely with an iPhone 6 Plus, and was edited and composited with Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC (watch The Making of I Don’t Want To Live on The Moon). Look for cameos by Iron Man, Sponge Bob Squarepants, Buzz Lightyear, Voltron, Optimus Prime, and Princess Unikitty.

For sure video is prominent in social media, but each platform treats it differently. In addition, social media changes constantly; what’s true today may be ancient history tomorrow (actually, since Dave’s session, Twitter introduced Periscope). Dave learned a few things when he social-shared I Don’t Want To Live on The Moon:

  • YouTube: The second most used search engine (after Google) is the best bet for crossing platforms (desktop, mobile, set-top boxes, game consoles) and creating a channel of content. Always make a custom thumbnail and add a title, description, and tags.
  • Facebook: Either a) upload the video directly to Facebook or b) post a picture with a link to the video in the description (embedding a video by linking to the URL makes a not-so-eye-catching and much smaller thumbnail).
  • Twitter: YouTube, Vine, and Twitter videos show up as embeds, Instagram and Facebook videos don’t. But, what seems to play best on Twitter, among all the words, is an image. With a link to the video.
  • Instagram/Vine: Best for short video messages and teasers. Also perfect places to experiment with new video techniques.
  • LinkedIn/Personal Blogs: Write a longer post and embed the video in it.

My Conclusion: Have a story to tell? In an era of short attention spans, video could be the best way to tell it. So… Look around. Frame the shot. Get things ready. Record.

Dave’s SXSW session in his words: Making Social Media POP! with Video and Making Your Videos POP!

 
Read the wrap-up of Session 7: Story Structure Secrets with Christine Steele

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