Adobe Systems Incorporated

Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test and Adobe Muse CC

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Google recently announced a change in their site-ranking algorithm to include mobile-friendliness criteria for mobile search results, that will go live on April 21.

If your Adobe Muse site isn’t yet built to support mobile, it’s time to consider creating a tailored experience for your site visitors, whether they’re viewing on a desktop, tablet, or smartphone. Adobe Muse has the tools you need to prepare your site for this change, and ensure Google search queries continue to drive maximum site traffic, leads, and new business.

Get started with this step-by-step tutorial How to create a mobile website with Adobe Muse.

For an in-depth understanding of this change, and recommendations for creating a mobile-friendly site, read Mobile-Friendly Sites and Google Webmaster Tools on the Adobe Muse engineering team blog.

8:07 AM Comments (1) Permalink

Creative Cloud Libraries: Popping-up Somewhere New

IDMUDW_4CCColors, images, graphics, brushes, and text styles saved and synced and always ready to be used, reused and shared.

When we launched Creative Cloud Libraries in October 2014 we knew we had a feature on our hands that would take the headache out of managing creative assets—a place to store creative bits, where they would be organized and readily available.

Thing is, until today, Creative Cloud Libraries has been incorporated only in Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, and mobile apps like Adobe Brush CC and Adobe Color CC. Needless to say, since its launch at Adobe MAX, Adobe InDesign CC users have been clamoring for access to it.

Creative Cloud Libraries… It’s part of InDesign CC.

Starting now, InDesign CC users have CC Libraries. No more having assets on the wrong computer or scrambling to find the latest version of a graphic. CC Libraries means knowing exactly where creative assets are. Always.

It also means the ability to share assets with an entire creative team, between ID files, and across InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator CC.

And, since we know a lot of designers have populated InDesign CC’s native libraries with the graphic elements (text frames, linked graphics or groups of objects) they use regularly, those assets (all or a selection) can be easily migrated into CC Libraries. That’s a new library with the same content and the same name as the native library.

CC Libraries. Got it. What else is new for InDesign CC?

IDMUDW_1IDInDesign CC (along with Adobe Dreamweaver CC) has not only added in-app learning content with tutorials for every experience level (that means, no longer having to leave the application to learn something new), the team didn’t stop there. It also incorporated some user-requested features that make everyday tasks easier:

  • Save time. Draw tables without text frames. When creating tables, it’s no longer necessary to first create a text frame.
  • No guessing. No hassle. The Print Current Page option (in the Print dialog and Pages panel flyout) prints the active page in the InDesign window or selected pages/spreads from the Pages panel.
  • Do the work once. On by default in the Layers flyout menu, Ungroup Remembers Layers ensures that when something is “ungrouped,” items that were originally on separate layers will return to them.

Hoping for more update news? We have it. Adobe Muse CC is faster, smoother, and more intuitive.

IDMUDW_2MUThe Adobe Muse team continues to respond to user feedback with updates that improve app quality and performance, and remove the bottlenecks in everyday tasks. There are literally dozens of improvements; a few of our favorite one-click options sure to speed-up work:

  • Superscript, Subscript, Uppercase, and Lowercase text buttons provide more flexibility when working with type.
  • A Clear All Styling option removes any styling (fill, stroke, text styles) for a selected page, and a Clear Widget Content option removes all content (slideshows, accordion panels, contact forms) from a selected widget.
  • Delete unused layers with a single click.
  • A Show Where Used option highlights where background images, bullet/list styles, uploaded assets, and paragraph, character and graphic styles have been used throughout layouts.

And, a bit more news… from the Dreamweaver CC team:

IDMUDW_3DWAmong Dreamweaver CC’s performance enhancements are improvements to two previously-released features:

  • Select, hold, and drag an image from the Extract panel into Live View to launch the Element Quick View panel for precise image insertion.
  • New creatively-named color-theme templates offer more options for customizing and personalizing Code View.

Take a closer look at what’s new in InDesign CC, Adobe Muse and Dreamweaver CC.
Learn more about Creative Cloud Libraries.
Haven’t tried Creative Cloud? Take it for a free trial run.

12:01 PM Permalink

Getting Familiar with Adobe Muse

Five feature tips for Adobe Muse CC that Joseph Angelo Todaro couldn’t NOT share.

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Designer Joseph Angelo Todaro began using Muse CC about two years ago. Not long after, he started helping other designers get up to speed with the application, first with tutorial videos on YouTube and later with Muse Resources, a library of, well, resources to use in Muse… tutorials, graphics, templates, widgets and Tips & Tricks.

MuseTips_Logo_2 We asked Joseph, also a software instructor with more than 5,000 hours of teaching under his belt, what tips he’d pass along to other designers who were using Adobe Muse for the first time. He had more ideas than we had space, but finally narrowed down his selection; what follows is his Adobe Muse feature insight and advice.

So, open Muse CC, (grab a free 30-day trial), follow along, and see how easy it is to create websites with little or no development experience.

Getting the most out of Master Pages

Websites share elements between pages—navigation, background, and branding typically remain consistent, sitewide. With Adobe Muse, these elements don’t need to be created on each page individually; in fact they don’t even need to be copied and pasted to each page individually (which would make even the smallest changes tedious). For this purpose Adobe Muse has Master Pages.

When looking at your site map in Adobe Muse, Master Pages is at the bottom. Double click on the default “A-Master” to begin editing and adding global elements. You can create multiple different Master Pages and drag them onto any pages of your sitemap to which you want to apply that Master design.

What’s cool about this feature
One master page can be dragged onto another to combine globally repeating elements with sectionally repeating elements.

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As an example, let’s look at navigation (which needs to be on every single page): Let’s name the Master containing the navigation, “A-Master” and the Master we’ll use on the other fifteen pages of the site, that will have a banner at the top, “Banner.” At this point, most users would be inclined to duplicate A-Master, rename it Banner, then edit it. Instead, A-Master can be dragged onto Banner to apply its elements. Now when you need to change navigation, background, or branding you only need to do it in one place.

Leveraging Layers

The design canvas in Adobe Muse provides a lot of freedom and the ability to interact directly with objects (selecting, moving, and scaling couldn’t be any easier), but when it comes to organizing objects, Adobe Muse has a crucial tool: Layers.

MuseTips_4a By default, a new Muse project starts off with a single layer. Using the Layers Panel, which can be turned on and off from the Window menu, you can create or delete layers using the respective buttons at the bottom of the panel. Any new object on the canvas becomes part of the selected layer and both objects and layers can be dragged and dropped to rearrange. (Note: The Layers Panel can also be used to switch between images or slides in a slideshow or composition.)


MuseTips_4bWhat’s cool about this feature
When designing Master pages, you may find that elements from other pages, such as navigation, inadvertently end up on top of Master elements. To avoid getting caught in an impossible juggle of objects, I create three layers right off the bat and use the top layer for objects that should always float above the design; the bottom layer for background elements; and the middle layer for all other page design work.


Saving and managing color

Good design is deliberate. With that comes a certain consistency. Colors, for example, should be consistent throughout the design of your site. That doesn’t mean you can’t use many different colors… it simply means you shouldn’t have 30 varying shades of blue by accident. Fortunately, Muse allows us to save colors to the Swatches Panel/Color Picker, so we can reuse the exact same color for graphics and text throughout our sites.

What’s cool about this feature
Have you noticed what happens when you double click on a color swatch? A Swatch Options box appears and enables you to name your color swatch; more importantly, though, it also lets you CHANGE the color, and every single instance of it, on the entire website. That’s huge!

Let’s say, for example, you’re designing a site for a company with an orange logo. You create a swatch of the company’s exact orange, using the eyedropper. You use this swatch all over the site for text, shape fills, and strokes. Then you get an email from the client with the subject line, “Updated Logo,” stating that they’ve changed the shade of orange. Since you’ve used the same color swatch for every orange object, you can simply double click on your swatch and use the eyedropper to pick up the new orange. When you click OK, every element connected to that swatch updates to the new color.

It’s as simple as this:

Syncing text between layouts and pages

Adobe Muse allows us to create desktop, tablet, and phone versions of our websites to be sure that our sites look great on every device. The difficult part is that it could mean designing and maintaining three different versions of the site. In a recent update to Muse, we gained the ability to synchronize the content of text boxes across pages and layouts by using the Content Panel.

The Content Panel allows you to create “Collections” (organizational groups that hold “Tags”). Tags hold individual text box content that can then be applied to other text boxes throughout your site(s). When changing the content of a text box linked to a Tag, it updates the content of every single text box connected to that Tag.

What’s cool about this feature
By adding web fonts that contain graphics as characters, graphics can be synced across your pages and layouts. My Icon Megapack Webfont is a great example; it contains 458 icons in the form of text characters.

To create a Tag, select an existing text box and click the + in the content panel beneath the Collection you’d like to add it to (you may create additional collections at the bottom of the Content Panel to help you stay organized). To apply that content to another text box, select the destination text box and simply click the name of the Tag. Boom! The content will appear in your text box and remain synced moving forward. You can also copy and paste a text box with tagged content and, since both will be connected to the same Tag, they will automatically be synced.

See how it’s done:

Recycle resources

As a professional web designer, you are most likely in the business of creating original designs for each and every client. While the overall design may need to be original, not every element of it needs to be bespoke. For example, a nice simple contact form, can be saved and reused in the future. For this, Adobe Muse has a Library Panel.

What’s cool about this feature
The Library Panel allows you to import and export your saved items right from the bottom of the Panel. Now you can begin sharing and downloading items for your Library on the Adobe Muse Exchange (or grab free content from Muse Resources).

To save something that you plan to reuse to the Library Panel, select that object on your design canvas, click the New button at the bottom of the Library Panel and give it a name. Be careful not to confuse the Library Panel with the “Widgets Library Panel” (where you’ll find the widgets that come preloaded with Muse CC). The Library Panel is persistent and the same content displays as you move between projects and the items in it can be dragged-and-dropped onto the design canvas of any site you build in the future.

How it works:

10:25 AM Permalink

PLP Architecture: An Innovative Practice and Creative Growth

A leading architecture studio equips its design professionals with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.

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PLP Architecture’s, team of architects, designers, and thinkers value the transformative role of ideas and the capacity for architecture to inspire. The latest digital technologies, including parametric design, are integral to the creative process and the collaborative and enquiring design approach of the studio.

PLP Architecture has long worked with Adobe creative software as part of the varied range of creative software helping its design teams and specialist groups to evolve ideas and deliver successful presentations; from visualization artists who specialize in renderings and animations to 3D modelmakers and graphic designers who realize a wide range of communications material.

“Adobe software, particularly Photoshop CC, is at the center of our multiple creative workflows,” says Mark Shattock, IT manager at PLP Architecture. “Adobe software is an important tool used at all stages of the design process and to effectively present our innovative designs to existing and potential clients, consultants, planning authorities, and to both the architectural profession and the wider community.”

Imperial West Technology Transfer Building; White City, London, UK. Client: Imperial College London and Voreda Capital

Imperial West Technology Transfer Building; White City, London, UK. Client: Imperial College London and Voreda Capital

Mainstay software for an expanding design studio

Having typically purchased traditional Adobe creative software packages, PLP Architecture was faced with the issue of making sure everyone had the relevant software solutions to successfully fulfill their design activities.

The studio, limiting the number of software installations in relation to the number of licenses, had to track licenses for the software that moved from machine to machine while remaining aware of the specific applications to which the architects, interior architects, landscape architects, and urban designers had access. At the same time, the practice, having grown significantly since its inception in 2009, repeatedly acquired additional licenses that also needed to be tracked and managed.

Following a period of momentous growth in relation to a number of new UK and international commissions, Shattock considered this need for further software licenses as the opportune time to introduce a concurrent license model with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise, rather than continuing to purchase earlier versions of the desktop software.

“The launch of Adobe Creative Cloud offers multiple advantages such as the ability to give everyone access to the necessary software,” says Shattock. “We upgraded the entire practice, at a key time, to Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise.”

Customizable creative software packages

PLP Architecture realized that Creative Cloud for enterprise would provide the organization with simple and easy access to a broad range of creative desktop applications and services, along with license management tools and enterprise-level technical support. Creative Cloud for enterprise also allowed flexible license true-ups to simplify software-tracking and financial management tasks.

The Creative Cloud Packager allows the IT department to customize and make available software for various design groups depending on their requirements, responsibilities, and tasks while maintaining centralized control of and transparency into software licenses.

“The ability to use Creative Cloud Packager to customize software packages for different groups based on their needs is very convenient,” says Shattock. “From an IT perspective, Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise makes managing our practice systems much simpler.”

Broad access fuels creative success

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK.

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK.

At PLP Architecture, Adobe InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, and Photoshop CC are go-to tools for illustrating projects and design proposals and are used by the graphic design team to present project-specific and communications material, combining a wide range of digital and print media.

The visualization team frequently finishes renderings using Photoshop CC, and produces and edits videos and rendered animations using Adobe Premiere Pro CC (noted by Richard Woolsgrove, head of visualization, for the seamless referencing of After Effects CC files, which makes working with the two products particularly efficient) and Adobe After Effects CC.

Additionally, the software is immediately available through the enterprise license when individuals or a design team wish to explore new applications for particular activities, for example Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC. “When our graphic design team recently requested to work with Adobe Muse CC, we were able to provide the program without having to negotiate a new purchase or manually install the software,” says Shattock.

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK. Client: Victoria Circle Limited Partnership (Land Securities and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board)

Nova, Victoria; Westminster, London, UK. Client: Victoria Circle Limited Partnership (Land Securities and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board)

Promoting growth, controlling costs

The enterprise agreement has made it easier to set current costs and to forecast future expenditure on software. New members of staff may be equipped with the most suitable package and costs reconciled at the end of the financial year.

Everyone uses the same version of software, so there are no issues with collaborating and exchanging files, adding to the benefits. “The flexible license model provided with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise helps the studio respond to the different requirements of our projects and is much easier for the IT group to manage than traditional desktop software,” says Shattock. “With Adobe Creative Cloud, we always have the most current software versions and no longer have to purchase a piece of software and upgrade later. Ultimately with our enterprise agreement, we know what we spend on Adobe software each year and are able to budget in accordance with the studio’s current and projected workload and activities.”

Read the PLP Architecture case study.

5:01 PM Permalink

Creative Cloud: A New Era of Mobile Creativity

Just over three months after the major 2014 release of Creative Cloud, we’re delivering another milestone Creative Cloud release at Adobe MAX 2014. A quick run-down of the new and updated Creative Cloud apps, features and services that are available today.

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Your Creative Profile connects you to your work

Think you can’t do “real” creative work on your iPhone or iPad? That’s about to change. With this release, our Creative Cloud team is setting out to transform the way you work across desktops and devices.

It all starts with a Creative Profile—your creative identity within Creative Cloud—the heart of this Creative Cloud release. Your Creative Profile connects you to your work, to the assets you create with, and to the communities you care about—wherever you are. Your files, photos, colors, brushes, shapes, fonts, text styles, graphics, and assets from Creative Cloud Market will be at your fingertips because your Creative Profile moves with you. It works across apps and across devices, giving you access to what you need, when you need it, and in the right context.

Meet the mobile app families

In June we brought the power of Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC to devices with a complementary set of imaging and illustration mobile apps. Not only do these apps break down the silos between desktop and mobile, but they’re fun and easy to use, and provide countless new ways to express your creativity. Today we’re proudly debuting more new apps, as well as updates to all of the apps we introduced in June:

The Illustrator family of apps extends the power of Illustrator CC to mobile devices:

MAX_1_DrawAdobe Illustrator Draw—An all-new app that reinvents the best of Adobe Ideas, letting you work with familiar tools and features in a modern, streamlined interface. Better syncing makes it easier to send drawings to Illustrator CC for refinement.

MAX_2_LineAdobe Illustrator Line—A major update to the app we first shipped in June; Line sketches can now be sent to Illustrator CC, enabling you to edit original vector paths, and more.

 

The Photoshop family of apps brings the power of Adobe digital imaging to mobile devices with the full compatibility of Photoshop and Lightroom:

MAX_3_MixAdobe Photoshop Mix—Now available for both iPhone and iPad, it includes amazing new technology with a cut-out option that automatically creates a selection for the primary element in an image.

 

MAX_4_SketchAdobe Photoshop Sketch—Draw with new expressive brushes as well as custom brushes, and send sketch artwork to Photoshop as a PSD file, opening the door to deeper integration between Sketch and Photoshop CC.

MAX_5_LRLightroom mobile—Builds on the amazing image management and editing capabilities… view comments and favorites in Lightroom mobile that clients, friends, or family leave on the photos you’ve shared online in Lightroom on the web.

 

The Premiere family now has a mobile app for video editing on the go:

MAX_6_ClipAdobe Premiere Clip—Our first video-editing app brings the power of Adobe Premiere Pro CC to mobile. It works on iPhone and iPad and integrates with Premiere Pro CC on the desktop for professional editing and finishing.

 

We’re also really excited about a new family of mobile apps for capturing inspiration on the go and dropping them directly into your creative workflow:

MAX_7_ColorAdobe Color CC (formerly Adobe Kuler)—Create color themes on your iPhone from the photos that inspired them.

 

MAX_8_BrushAdobe Brush CC—Transform images on your iPhone and iPad into unique brushes for Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC or Photoshop Sketch.

 

MAX_9_ShapeAdobe Shape CC—Turn shapes and objects from high-contrast photos on your iPhone into editable vectors for use in Illustrator CC and Illustrator Draw.

 

Updated desktop apps & services make it all easier

MAX_10_PhotoshopPhotoshop CCNew 3D printing features, enhanced Mercury Graphics Engine performance, and improved support for Touch on Windows 8

 

MAX_11_IllustratorIllustrator CC—A new Curvature tool, and new Touch support for Windows 8 devices like Microsoft Surface Pro

 

MAX_12_InDesignInDesign CC—Interactive EPUB support and a new Color Theme tool

 

MAX_13_MuseAdobe Muse CC—SVG support and Synchronized Text

 

MAX_14_PremierePremiere Pro CC—Search Bins and GPU-optimized playback

 

MAX_15_AfterEffectsAfter Effects CC—An enhanced 3D pipeline and HiDPI support

 

MAX_16_DreamweaverDreamweaver CC—Expanded Live View and Creative Cloud Extract (read on for details)

 

MAX_17_FlashFlash Pro CC—Improved WebGL support and custom brushes

 

  • Creative Cloud Market—A collection of high-quality, curated content that’s free to Creative Cloud members. Access thousands of patterns, icons, brushes and vector shapes to add to your own projects.*
  • Creative Cloud Libraries—A powerful asset management service, connected to your Creative Profile, that facilitates a seamless workflow between our desktop and mobile apps. Save favorite colors, brushes, text styles, graphics, vector images, and content from Creative Cloud Market into one of your Libraries, and those creative assets will be available to you as you work across Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and our mobile apps.
  • Creative Cloud Extract—Simplifies the comp-to-code workflow by making it a snap to extract design information (like CSS, colors, gradients, measurements, and fonts) from a PSD file. Extract works right inside of Photoshop CC and Dreamweaver CC, or can be accessed in Creative Cloud Assets where your files are stored.

The power of community

The Behance community has grown by leaps and bounds since joining the Adobe family, and now has over 4 million members with more than 20,000 new portfolio projects and “works in progress” published every day. The new Creative Talent Search from Behance connects creatives across the globe with job opportunities from top companies and major brands. Just one more great reason to join Behance if you haven’t yet.

A big investment in training

The pace of innovation in Creative Cloud tools and services is growing fast. So the Creative Cloud Learn team has stepped up its game to keep you on top of your game. Hone your skills with hundreds of tutorials that cater to every experience level. The how-tos are viewable in your browser, on your iPad, and some are available inside your Creative Cloud desktop apps.

 

There are some amazing new things in this release. And you can see it all, just as it unfolded, from center stage in the Adobe MAX 2014 Day 1 launch keynote, now available on demand. Watch the new mobile apps in action and see how they connect with the desktop apps and services through your Creative Profile—your creative identity within Creative Cloud.

Get your hands on the newest Creative Cloud apps, features and services available today. If you’re already a member, it’s time to update Photoshop and your other apps. And if you’re not a member yet, join us for the journey.

*You must be a paid member to access Creative Cloud Market assets; Creative Cloud Assets are not included with Creative Cloud photography plans.

9:49 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud: A (Continuing) Promise to Innovate

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We’ve done it again (and again, and again, and again)… continued to fulfill our promise for ongoing innovation to Creative Cloud.

Read on to catch up on the latest and greatest Creative Cloud updates to services and apps that will help you get your creative on.

Promise_1
The new Creative Cloud Market, just released in July, is a royalty-free repository that gives paid Creative Cloud members* access to a curated collection of Behance-sourced vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and layered PSD files. Creative Cloud Market has been a huge hit because it gives members a jump-start on their designs. Find the Market under the Assets tab of the Creative Cloud desktop app.

And stay tuned: Creative Cloud Market is also coming to your browser, and Adobe’s mobile apps, starting with Adobe Sketch (read the update below).


Promise_2
Nothing’s evolving faster than 3D printing, and Adobe is in lockstep.

Just a few months after releasing Adobe Photoshop CC with 3D printing capability, we’re now providing expanded support for new 3D printers (MakerBot Replicator 5th Generation), and print services (check our current list of print service providers), and we’ve added a broader range of supported file formats including VRML, U3D, PLY, and IGES. Plus there’s now streamlined 3D painting and the ability to combine multiple jobs into a single print bed. So even if your 3D printer is slow, setting up your design will be quick.


Promise_3
Adobe Muse CC, the app that enables designers, who don’t want to learn code, to build and publish beautiful websites, continues to evolve and gather fans.

Adobe Muse now supports self-hosted web fonts, and the new Bullet Styles and Glyphs panels facilitate one-click addition of bulleted or numbered lists and special characters (such as © or ᵝ). We’ve also partnered with Google to include reCAPTCHA, a free service that uses text and number distortion to distinguish humans from bots. Now you can more easily create better-looking web pages and put the brakes on spam.


Promise_4
Finally, Adobe Sketch (now in version 1.1) keeps getting better.

The mobile drawing app, with the capability to express and connect with the broader creative community now includes free, in-app access to Creative Cloud Market so you can add high-quality assets to compositions on the go, and faster file syncing for easier sharing with Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC. There’s also finer precision when drawing shapes with more finished, chamfered corners with
Adobe Slide or Touch Slide (a built-in feature for drawing straight lines and curves without hardware).


Keep an eye on this blog for our monthly roundup of the new additions to Creative Cloud.

And don’t forget, Adobe MAX is October 4–8. Register now for the Los Angeles event and you’ll be among the first to learn what’s coming next to Creative Cloud.

 

* With the exception of the Creative Cloud Photography and Photoshop Photography plans.

12:00 PM Permalink

Learn Something New: The Latest Creative Cloud Tutorials

Creative Cloud Learn has hundreds of tutorials that help members get started, grasp essentials, learn how to use new applications, and take full advantage of a Creative Cloud membership.

This week the Learn team’s new tutorial content focuses (primarily) on the new features in Adobe Muse CC and helping experienced video professionals make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC:

Switch to Premiere Pro CC

LearnNew_1_PPro

Switch from Final Cut Pro. In this 20-minute tutorial, learn the simple XML workflow for exporting projects from Final Cut Pro and importing them into Premiere Pro CC.

Latest tips for quick video editing. Learn the latest workflow shortcuts, file performance enhancements, scrubbing tricks, and dozens of tips that improve and quicken the video editing experience in Premiere Pro CC.

Export a Digital Cinema Package. Learn how to export a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), an industry-standard collection of digital files, directly from the timeline in Premiere Pro CC.

Work with text in Adobe Muse

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Add self-hosted web fonts. Because no one can ever have too many typefaces, Adobe Muse CC just made it easier to use the fonts you already own: In this five-minute video, learn to add web fonts, licensed and downloaded from font foundries or services, to your Adobe Muse font menu.

Bullets and number lists. In this four-minute video, learn how to use the new Bullet, Bullet Styles, and Glyphs panels to easily add great-looking customized bulleted and numbered lists to website designs.

And a couple of extras

Access Creative Cloud Market design assets. Learn how to access and use Creative Cloud Market’s treasure trove of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and for-placement images in design and web development projects.

Make selections based on focus. A three-minute how-to about making selections based on depth-of-field using Photoshop CC’s time-saving Focus Mask feature.

9:59 AM Permalink

It’s Another Update for Adobe Muse CC

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More font choices, bulleted lists, and spam protection… On the heels of the first major phase of the native 64-bit rebuild of Adobe Muse in June, the product team has released a handful of top-requested design features and enhancements:





There’s also support for right-to-left languages, such as Hebrew and Arabic. To see a complete list of updates, with videos to learn how to get started, visit the Adobe Muse We’ve Been Busy page.

Already a Creative Cloud member? Download the latest Adobe Muse update from the Creative Cloud desktop app or directly from Adobe Muse.

Not a Creative Cloud member yet? Don’t miss out. Download the free 30-day Adobe Muse CC trial.

10:54 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud Tutorials: Better Than Ever

On June 18 2014, at a Creative Cloud launch event, Adobe introduced exciting new features to the applications in Creative Cloud, a newly reimagined Adobe.com, and hundreds of new Creative Cloud tutorials.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

I want to share with you the new design for Adobe.com and its integration with Creative Cloud’s Learn, Help and Support content, which is now accessible from any of the product pages, or from the Learn and Support landing page.

Hundreds of tutorials

A big focus of this redesign  was to make it much easier for everyone to find and access learn content. Another important focus was to provide richer content. The larger variety of learn content now includes single video overviews, multi-video step-by-step processes and longer project-based articles.

As much as possible, the Creative Cloud Learn team worked to provide content aimed at encouraging Creative Cloud members to get their hands on the products and try the new features and workflows themselves; the ability to download project files makes it easy to jump in quickly and start building solutions of your own.

From the home page

The menu sandwich icon appears on every page of Adobe.com and provides links to all of the Creative Cloud products as well as Learn & Support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

All product home pages can be accessed from the main page by clicking on the icon for any of the featured products or the All Products button. Learning opportunities are widely integrated throughout Adobe.com and some, such as the updated Live Design feature for Adobe Dreamweaver CC, have a feature preview that can be viewed from the main product page.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver's marquee image.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver’s marquee image.

Anywhere you see a See How It Works link, you can click it to get a new or updated tutorial to begin working with that feature. The See How It Works link on the Dreamweaver CC product page marquee image takes you to an in-depth, hands-on tutorial from which you can download the project files and begin working with the new feature.

Scrolling down from the marquee image reveals links to the next four new/popular product features from the current release and access to corresponding tutorials. Below each image is a See How It Works link.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

From the product pages

Click Learn and Support from any of the pages on Adobe.com. Dig deeper by going to the Learn and Support landing page to get access to all of the Learning, help and support content for the Creative Cloud products.

Each product's Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Each product’s Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Content tiles across the top provide access to the primary learning content for each of the learn categories as well as direct access to that product’s online help. Click the Show All tutorials link to reveal the navigation section to access all of the learn tutorials and click Hide All Tutorials to save space.

A variety of Learn content types

Creative Cloud Learn content now comes in a wider variety of content types:

Project-based tutorials
We’ve added a lot more in the way of project-based videos with downloadable project files so members can try the steps on their own. For example, the tutorials for Dreamweaver’s new and updated Live View, CSS Designer, Element Quick View, Modern Platform Support, Integration with Edge Animate, all now have project-based tutorials with project files. (Downloadable project files are accessible  by clicking the Get Files button in the What do I need? section at the top of the tutorial.)

Access a tutorial's project files and product cheat sheet.

Access a tutorial’s project files and product cheat sheet.

Single-video tutorials
Single-video tutorials, such as What Is Dreamweaver, demonstrate specific concepts or features. Just click the Play button directly in the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Multi-video tutorials
Multiple-video tutorials, such as How to Make and Style A Web Page in Dreamweaver, break a project down into logical steps. Many of these have project files that you can download and follow along with the presenter.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

In-app learning
Learn content is also available within the products themselves. Each product has an in-app feature tour and new feature videos—available from the Welcome screen and Help menus. In-app feature tours provide an animated overview of the new features along with videos introducing the new features and how they work.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

Project Hello in Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Muse CC

Project Hello, launched in Illustrator CC and Muse CC, delivers personalized learning content directly within the application. Keep checking these for new and useful content.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Leave feedback

Whether it’s something you like or some way we can improve our Learn content, we want to know… Each product tutorial has a feedback link at the bottom. Let us know what you think.

Enjoy learning!

I’m very excited about the new Learn offering available in conjunction with the Creative Cloud 2014 launch: Not only do the designs of the marquee images and tutorial assets, by our talented design team, really show the potential of what can be done with the Creative Cloud products but the content is richer than ever before, and the variety of tutorials will definitely appeal to a range of learning styles.

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Making a Splash with Adobe Creative Cloud 2014

As users update their Adobe Creative Cloud apps with the 2014 release they’ll be greeted with more than just new features… the splash screens for their favorite apps are also new and feature inspiring artwork from some talented designers. For anyone who hasn’t updated yet (or even for those who have) here’s a preview of a few of the new screens, along with the the inside scoop from the artists who created them:

Splash_1_PS
Kylli Sparre—Adobe Photoshop CC
A self-taught designer, Kylli Sparre was attracted to Adobe Photoshop because of the endless options it gave her. According to Sparre, who describes her style as dreamlike, symbolic, and sometimes surreal, the limitlessness of image-making helped to open up her creativity. The image featured on the Adobe Photoshop CC splash screen is one of Sparre’s personal projects. She knew she wanted to combine the photo of the woman with the location shot, but none of the things she tried worked until she noticed an interesting connection between the two images. After adjusting the angle she was able to emphasize the connection with extraordinary results.

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Geso/Pablo IAAdobe After Effects CC
With a style that straddles art and design, Pablo Iglesias enjoys exploring all kinds of visual disciplines, most recently focusing on more live and video art that combines a range of creative disciplines. For the Adobe After Effects CC  splash screen, he first created some graphic elements in Photoshopa kind of digital illustration recreating a transparent prism with iridescent colors. Next, he generated some video loops with the image in Adobe Premiere Pro CC, using different movements and mirror effects. He then played the loops in a program he uses for live video performance, applied effects such as zoom, RGB delays, and 3D deformations, and captured it all with Syphon. The last step was to make the final edit and composition in Adobe Premiere Pro. The After Effects CC splash screen is one of the frames he captured from the final video.

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Črtomir JustAdobe Muse CC
The design for the Adobe Muse CC splash screen was the result of an experiment. Artist Črtomir Just typically begins all projects by sketching, but moves quickly into the digital realm, working with Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign CC. For this project, he was trying out some new things on his own time, working with abstract 3D shapes that started to remind him of real-world animals. He developed the idea into a series of abstract yet realistic forms.

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Nick TaylorAdobe Flash Professional CC
Nick Taylor’s generative projects tend to follow a similar pattern. He starts by creating several short snippets of code, and when the code produces an output he likes, he’ll flesh it out into a larger program. He often imports vectors from Illustrator or raster images from Photoshop and manipulates them with code. He’ll tweak parameters to adjust color, scale, and composition, save unique PDF files, and take those he likes back into Illustrator or Photoshop for additional adjustments.

The Adobe Flash Professional CC splash screen is one of a number of images spawned from a single program. The program began as a very basic experiment involving a pair of individually-rotating vectors, with the second vector attached to the end of the first. It was inspired by the motion of a double pendulum. Taylor connected a number of these vector-pairs and introduced mouse tracking, allowing him to “draw” unique compositions onto the canvas. He finished the piece in Photoshop with texture overlays and color correction.

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Holger LippmanAdobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe Audition CC
German artist Holger Lippman’s likes to incorporate rhythm, repetition, and iteration into his projects and says that his artwork is heavily influenced by electronic music. His work process starts with simple code that grows over weeks, and months, even years. The piece of art that appears on the Adobe Audition CC splash screen was based on the simple Peter De Jong map equations: x’ = sin(a * y) – cos(b * x) and y’ = sin(c * x) – cos(d * y)

The artwork chosen for the Adobe Premiere Pro CC splash screen was created using Adobe Flash Professional and programming. Lippman used an iteration algorithm consisting of a three-sided pseudo cube within an X Y matrix. The algorithm is divided down by two on six to eight layers, with randomness in number, size, color, and on/off state. Each repetition of the process results in one iteration, which is used as the starting point for the next iteration. He also coded a slight force to cluster the cubes to create little cloud gatherings.

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Patrick SeymourAdobe Illustrator CC
When Patrick Seymour was four-years-old, his mother predicted that he would be an illustrator. Today, with a degree in graphic design, he primarily works on personal projects and likes drawing the same thing many times using different styles. He typically begins with a picture or hand drawing and traces his lines over it. The illustration selected for the Adobe Illustrator CC splash screen was created using this line style. Seymour drew five or six gorillas and three or four lions. The illustration Adobe selected came from experimenting with different colors rather than using his typical black and white style.

The Creative Cloud Splash Screen collection on Behance.


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