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Sundance Filmmaker Antonio Ribeiro Brings His Creativity Online

For those who were following the Sundance Film Festival this year, Antonio Ribeiro may be a familiar name. Ribeiro is the editor and producer of Things of the Aimless Wanderer, a film by Kivu Ruhorahoza.

Since his debut feature film Grey Matter, which premiered at Tribeca in 2011, scooping the Juri Special Mention and Best Actors award, Antonio has been collaborating with Kivu Ruhorahoza, creating Moon Road Films, a production company whose main mission is to find original new ways to tell stories. Their latest film is one of only half dozen or so selected feature films screened in the New Frontier category at the renowned festival.

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As if that’s not impressive enough, Antonio Riberio is also the man behind the film’s accompanying website. Although he doesn’t see himself as a web designer, that’s exactly the role he found himself in, as time was running out prior to the World Premiere of Things of the Aimless Wanderer.

When you have a film on your hands that you know is going places, you need an online destination for fans, critics and other stakeholders. You need a site that can support embedded video, have social media sharing capabilities, incorporate a tagging structure and host a blog. Oh, and of course it needs to look good and be easy to navigate, interactive, and intuitive.

In comes the Creative Cloud.

Ribeiro, who used Adobe Premiere Pro CC to cut Things of the Aimless Wanderer and Adobe After Effects CC to deal with some needed matting and mask work, is a Creative Cloud subscriber. He turned his attention from purple to green.

“Although I am not a web developer or designer, I started to explore the use of  Dreamweaver CC, as it provided an interface between language and design,” said Ribeiro. “Initially I was not familiar with HTML or CSS, but after using Dreamweaver CC and reading a few tutorials I was able to make sense of what I was doing.”

He did have some help. Ribeiro opted to purchase a website template in order to get a professional looking site off the ground without significant costs, time constraints or the technical demands of also learning how to be a full-fledged web designer. He loaded the template into Dreamweaver CC and began to explore, learning along the way.

“Dreamweaver has given me an understanding of what HTML and CSS do. Using the Live tab I can understand behavior through the ability to Extract Assets from Photoshop CC comps,” said Ribeiro.

“I feel it’s strange for me to say this, as I always feel slightly self-conscious that I am no expert, but I now have the confidence to look at a template and understand how it breaks down into its different components.”

Ingenuity is often born from circumstance, and Ribeiro certainly had a need to fill and a limited budget to make it so.

“After all, I am a filmmaker but if I can make and customize good looking sites for my different projects, then it’s a win-win situation,” said Ribeiro. “In this business, good presentation counts.”

In the end, from film to website, Creative Cloud touched each step of Ribeiro’s workflow. In many ways, he represents the kind of new creative who runs a small shop, wears many hats and learns to tackle new aspects of a growing business on the fly.

“The best thing I could have done, was to embrace the Cloud, where I can have access to all the programs I need for one single monthly fee,” said Ribeiro.

Learn more about Things of the Aimless Wanderer in this video:

Download a free trial of Adobe Dreamweaver CC today to start pushing your creative boundaries.

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Klip Collective pushes film into new spaces at Sundance

Projection mapping installation relies on Adobe Creative Cloud tools

It almost had to happen. Tom Wait’s spooky spoken word song What’s He Building in There, is so evocative, so “visual” that it’s like film that plays in your mind. The challenge, though, is how to actually make a film that does justice to the genius of the original piece.

Ricardo Rivera, visual artist, filmmaker, and founder of Klip Collective, began exploring video projections when he worked as a club VJ in Philadelphia. “In 1998 I was playing around with Photoshop and discovered how to map images to surfaces,” recalls Rivera. “When After Effects added the ability to preview work through a mini DV connection, I discovered that I could easily play content through a digital projector.” Rivera pointed the projector at a wall in his kitchen and used it to canvas the surfaces. “Then I masked all of the elements in the kitchen using Photoshop and created what was, in effect, a multi-channel projection feed through one projector and one feed.”

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Once Rivera had figured out the workflow, the possibilities were endless. Today Klip Collective holds two patents on projection mapping, a technique whereby video content is projected onto non-traditional display surfaces such as the sides of buildings, often as site-specific art. Different physical surfaces come to life in unexpected ways in a dance of shapes, color, and imagery, melding the permanence of architecture with the transience of light. These are the kinds of new frontiers for art that digital tools make possible.

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Adobe & Sundance 2013 Recap

IMG_1738-e1360175890131Sundance Film Festival.  Sundance is the largest and, arguably, the most important annual event for independent film in the United States.  Over the last few years numerous films, including Precious, Winter’s Bone, and Beasts of the Southern Wild, which premiered at Sundance, have gone on to receive nominations for Best Picture at the Academy Awards.  In addition to film, technology is a large topic of conversation at Sundance – filmmakers, aspiring hopefuls and enthusiasts alike share their opinions and preferences regarding the tools they’re using to produce their creative work.

Sundance 2013 was, once again, a huge success for the Adobe video team.   There was strong Adobe presence all over the festival and numerous films in the festival were cut exclusively with Adobe video tools (through Creative Cloud!).  Creative and technology panels boasted the strengths of Adobe video products and partnerships and festival attendees and filmmakers were proud to make known their plans to switch to Adobe Premiere Pro, if they haven’t done so already.

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To learn more about everything Adobe at the Sundance Film Festival check out the videos created on the ground in Park City during the festival – they’ve already garnered over 8,500 views on Adobe TV!

Adobe & Sundance 2013 – Part 1: Sundance filmmakers share why they’ve decided to make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe Creative Cloud: http://adobe.ly/YvQlTH

Adobe & Sundance 2013 – Part 2: Adobe hosted a panel of industry luminaries – here they share how Adobe video tools are helping them and their colleagues succeed in a rapidly changing media industry: http://adobe.ly/111QyiN

Adobe & Sundance 2013 – Part 3: Adobe loves connecting with the community and is proud of our growing partner ecosystem: adobe.ly/XGhA7b

Filmaker Kyle Patrick Alvarez talks about his film C.O.G. The first and only film adaption of a David Sedaris story, for which he switched to Premiere Pro through Creative Cloud membership: http://adobe.ly/VdSaQu

Filmaker Jim Mickle discusses why he switched to Premiere Pro for his film We Are What We Are and why he thinks Adobe Creative Cloud is the best option for independent filmmakers: http://adobe.ly/11gHo19

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