Blog Post:Marketers today know the value of creating relevant and exciting experiences throughout the customer journey. It’s how brands win the hearts and minds of their customers, but it’s also more than that. When you win the win the heart and mind of a customer, that customer is more likely to recommend your product or service to someone else. In contrast, when customers are disappointed with a brand, they’re unlikely to keep their disappointment to themselves. Customer loyalty can be a valuable marketing tool, making the customer experience even more vital to a brand’s marketing strategy. This was the focus of several recent contributions to CMO.com. Pete Markey, brand communications and marketing director at Aviva, shared some of the strategies Aviva is using to win the hearts and minds of customers in the digital space. For Aviva, the focus on building the best frictionless experience for customers is a top priority and one they’re achieving with MyAviva, the digital space where all of the company’s products come together. According to Markey, the key to winning customer loyalty is to put the customer first by designing the products, services, and experiences they want and need. Jon Bains, founding partner of What & Why, discussed the importance of truth in marketing. He shared that although people often view marketers as having a relationship with the truth similar to that of real estate agents and recruitment consultants, marketers have been forced to enter a “golden age of truth.” Customers value brands that are honest and direct, and because information spreads so quickly in today’s digital age, disappointment in a brand is rarely limited to a one-to-one conversation between the customer and the brand. Truth is a necessity for brands that want to win customer loyalty and recommendations. Jason Miller, global content marketing leader for LinkedIn, revealed that many brands are creating content that ends up being “just clutter” in the vast amount of content available to consumers. According to Miller, there’s just too much content, and much of it is just “noise that is pushed out in isolation of any coherent strategy or insights.” Miller is quick to advocate for content marketing, but there’s a missing component from many brands’ content strategy, which is asking “so what?” from the customer’s point of view. The goal with content marketing should be creating content that “educates, inspires, and provokes potential buyers right from the start.” Michael Brunt, CMO of The Economist, recently sat down for an exclusive interview with CMO.com to discuss the publication’s recent change in focus from advertising to subscription income. He described how the publication has capitalised on the growing demand for high-quality journalism. Then it became about “finding those audiences and optimising the customer journey to encourage them to subscribe.” For The Economist, customer experience is about the reading experience, and the brand is built around giving customers great reading experiences that encourage them to subscribe for more. Alastair Cole, chief innovation officer for Partners Andrews Aldridge, discussed the roles of creative technology and product development in developing experiences that excite customers. Creative technology can be used to support and enhance short-term marketing campaigns. Cole cited a recent campaign by Charity Women’s Aid that utilised the technology within digital billboards to engage people looking at the screen and raise awareness of domestic violence. Cole also pointed out that technology is vital in product development, often aiding in creating tools “that improve people’s lives on a longer-term basis.” We invite you to read and engage with our exclusive content on CMO.com and learn from some of today’s best marketing minds. Please let us know what you think. Author: Date Created:15 March 2017 Date Published: Headline:Designing the Customer Experience to Encourage Brand Loyalty Social Counts: Keywords: Publisher:Adobe Image:https://blogs.adobe.com/digitaleurope/files/2017/01/170110_Header-Marketing-in-2017.png

Marketers today know the value of creating relevant and exciting experiences throughout the customer journey. It’s how brands win the hearts and minds of their customers, but it’s also more than that. When you win the win the heart and mind of a customer, that customer is more likely to recommend your product or service to someone else. In contrast, when customers are disappointed with a brand, they’re unlikely to keep their disappointment to themselves. Customer loyalty can be a valuable marketing tool, making the customer experience even more vital to a brand’s marketing strategy. This was the focus of several recent contributions to CMO.com.

Pete Markey, brand communications and marketing director at Aviva, shared some of the strategies Aviva is using to win the hearts and minds of customers in the digital space. For Aviva, the focus on building the best frictionless experience for customers is a top priority and one they’re achieving with MyAviva, the digital space where all of the company’s products come together. According to Markey, the key to winning customer loyalty is to put the customer first by designing the products, services, and experiences they want and need.

Jon Bains, founding partner of What & Why, discussed the importance of truth in marketing. He shared that although people often view marketers as having a relationship with the truth similar to that of real estate agents and recruitment consultants, marketers have been forced to enter a “golden age of truth.” Customers value brands that are honest and direct, and because information spreads so quickly in today’s digital age, disappointment in a brand is rarely limited to a one-to-one conversation between the customer and the brand. Truth is a necessity for brands that want to win customer loyalty and recommendations.

Jason Miller, global content marketing leader for LinkedIn, revealed that many brands are creating content that ends up being “just clutter” in the vast amount of content available to consumers. According to Miller, there’s just too much content, and much of it is just “noise that is pushed out in isolation of any coherent strategy or insights.” Miller is quick to advocate for content marketing, but there’s a missing component from many brands’ content strategy, which is asking “so what?” from the customer’s point of view. The goal with content marketing should be creating content that “educates, inspires, and provokes potential buyers right from the start.”

Michael Brunt, CMO of The Economist, recently sat down for an exclusive interview with CMO.com to discuss the publication’s recent change in focus from advertising to subscription income. He described how the publication has capitalised on the growing demand for high-quality journalism. Then it became about “finding those audiences and optimising the customer journey to encourage them to subscribe.” For The Economist, customer experience is about the reading experience, and the brand is built around giving customers great reading experiences that encourage them to subscribe for more.

Alastair Cole, chief innovation officer for Partners Andrews Aldridge, discussed the roles of creative technology and product development in developing experiences that excite customers. Creative technology can be used to support and enhance short-term marketing campaigns. Cole cited a recent campaign by Charity Women’s Aid that utilised the technology within digital billboards to engage people looking at the screen and raise awareness of domestic violence. Cole also pointed out that technology is vital in product development, often aiding in creating tools “that improve people’s lives on a longer-term basis.”

We invite you to read and engage with our exclusive content on CMO.com and learn from some of today’s best marketing minds. Please let us know what you think.

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