Blog Post:By 2019, mobile advertising spends ($82B) will be bigger than linear TV ($76B) in the U.S, witnessing a major trend for the whole industry. In this mobile first paradigm, consumers are shifting their attention from offline to online so brands are moving the same way and increase significantly their digital ad spends year after year. Programmatic buying has established itself as the logical evolution of our industry, growing faster than any other digital channels (31% in 2017). Technology is now a critical part of the process. It has enabled lots of new possibilities and transformed digital advertising like nothing before, giving brands and agencies the ability to manage an increasingly fragmented landscape where ubiquity and fluid experiences are the minimum expectations of any consumer. Our industry is sick and symptoms are self-explanatory  This is the bright side, the big opportunity for any brand. On the other side, this fast and critical change has created a new reality made of complexity, tons of players participating to a value chain which has become opaque to the point where advertisers cannot accept anymore. These concerns have been remarkably expressed by P&G Marc S. Pritchard in a call for transparency and trust in the advertising industry. Let’s face the reality, our industry is sick and its main symptoms are self-explanatory. Brands have raising concerns around ad fraud, brand safety, independent measurement, ‘walled gardens’, campaign viewability, wrong or fancy metrics provided by some of the biggest players, arbitrage, real cost of media and overall effectiveness. They have concerns for their brands and concerns on the way their budgets are invested. We have reached a tipping point where Trust has partly gone and where it is critical to start acting in order to restore it. Transparency is the only realistic path to restore Trust.  Making people change is probably the biggest challenge, no matter the industry. The current model of agency ‘doing’ and brands ‘controlling’ is totally obsolete. Any party should be hands-on; any CMO should have concerns if their teams are not comfortable with using technology. Any agency should be an agent of change, challenging established models and championing transparency. Restore Trust starts by working all together, sharing the same agenda, having joint goals and setting transparency as the corner stone of relations between Brands, Technologies and Agencies. Author: Date Created:18 May 2017 Date Published: Headline:Advertising: The Case for Transparency Social Counts: Keywords: Publisher:Adobe Image:https://blogs.adobe.com/digitaleurope/files/2017/05/Image-Think-Tank-Discussion-Recap-The-Future-of-Experience-Business-e1494906098907-1200x672.jpeg

By 2019, mobile advertising spends ($82B) will be bigger than linear TV ($76B) in the U.S, witnessing a major trend for the whole industry.

In this mobile first paradigm, consumers are shifting their attention from offline to online so brands are moving the same way and increase significantly their digital ad spends year after year.

Programmatic buying has established itself as the logical evolution of our industry, growing faster than any other digital channels (31% in 2017).

Technology is now a critical part of the process. It has enabled lots of new possibilities and transformed digital advertising like nothing before, giving brands and agencies the ability to manage an increasingly fragmented landscape where ubiquity and fluid experiences are the minimum expectations of any consumer.

Our industry is sick and symptoms are self-explanatory 

This is the bright side, the big opportunity for any brand. On the other side, this fast and critical change has created a new reality made of complexity, tons of players participating to a value chain which has become opaque to the point where advertisers cannot accept anymore. These concerns have been remarkably expressed by P&G Marc S. Pritchard in a call for transparency and trust in the advertising industry.

Let’s face the reality, our industry is sick and its main symptoms are self-explanatory. Brands have raising concerns around ad fraud, brand safety, independent measurement, ‘walled gardens’, campaign viewability, wrong or fancy metrics provided by some of the biggest players, arbitrage, real cost of media and overall effectiveness.

They have concerns for their brands and concerns on the way their budgets are invested. We have reached a tipping point where Trust has partly gone and where it is critical to start acting in order to restore it.

Transparency is the only realistic path to restore Trust. 

Making people change is probably the biggest challenge, no matter the industry. The current model of agency ‘doing’ and brands ‘controlling’ is totally obsolete. Any party should be hands-on; any CMO should have concerns if their teams are not comfortable with using technology. Any agency should be an agent of change, challenging established models and championing transparency.

Restore Trust starts by working all together, sharing the same agenda, having joint goals and setting transparency as the corner stone of relations between Brands, Technologies and Agencies.

2 Responses to Advertising: The Case for Transparency

  1. Teodora Takacs says:

    This is so true. And also, large companies should put a stop to silo thinking, especially when it comes to marketing and IT. When these two departments are driven by different goals, the only one who will suffer in the end, is the customer.

  2. Totally agree about “wrong or fancy metrics provided by some of the biggest players”. I’ve seen the weirdest, arbitrary metrics come up. It doesn’t usually take much reasoning to unravel the irrelevance of one of those bogus figures, but on the other hand it sometimes takes an inside perspective to know why it’s irrelevant. I think the reason it’s common lately is that this entire marketplace is new as therefore devoid of context. Amazon created a new business model. Facebook hybridized old revenue models into something new. There’s no precedent so there’s no context. It’s crazy but it’l all shake out over time. I guess it just manifests as increased risks and rewards.

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