Blog Post:Friends who have followed my posts know that I evangelize the use of Big Data to improve our digital marketing practices. We can leverage data across our Web properties, paid, owned, and earned media, and digital assets. We can test assets, create consumer profiles, target market segments, and determine campaign success based on data. Today, I want to discuss four tactics where we can leverage data to develop stronger cross-channel campaigns. #1. Build loyalty from social influencers We’re able to extract social data that reveals trending topics and key influencers who facilitate discussions through the myriad social channels. We can use this data to develop targeted loyalty programs for the most influential of social brands. Although we want to avoid becoming shameless “pay for play” suitors, we can effectively drive loyalty while expanding reach. Luxury cosmetics retailer Lancôme, for example, recently launched a social loyalty campaign, offering rewards for brand engagement and sharing. The L’Oreal-owned division has seen a 60 percent monthly action rate since the program’s inception. In some cases, social rewards points for sharing outpace online shopping points by more than double. We’ve got to be sharp when we target influencers through social channels. We can be more effective by targeting specific influencers (not simply existing customers), using data relevant to their number of followers, posting frequency, and follower engagement levels. Marketing publisher Econsultancy offered a framework to allocate marketing spend by segmenting our social audience. Research has shown that only 3 percent of social media influencers contribute 90 percent of impact to a brand. This suggests we can deploy more efficient social campaigns by targeting a narrow segment of influencers. After analyzing social data, we can target those top-tier influencers and build campaigns that reward their impact, leveraging their unique influencing capabilities. #2. Creating digital assets There is an abundance of information we can analyze, organize, and leverage from consumer search and browsing activity. I’m not talking about metrics such as page visits and traffic sources, though. I’m referring to the content on the pages being visited—page elements such as color scheme, text, images, banners, and navigation buttons. Capturing and analyzing this data allows us to examine the potential effect of these elements on user actions. From user activity metrics such as click-throughs, time on page, and others, we may be able to infer how appealing certain page content might be. For example, one particular color may be found to be more appealing than another based on page statistics. When we discover potential impact features, we should then embed similar elements in other digital marketing campaigns. If certain terms, keywords, or images trigger user actions, then we should share those elements across other marketing assets such as email, landing pages, or print catalogs. What works in some venues may likely work in others. #3. Respond to site search activity Site search data also reveals ways in which we can deepen our relationships with prospects and customers. Whether they are at the top of the funnel or closer to conversion, consumers use our site search capabilities to research specific interests. Site search provides a more granular picture of our visitors than filtering menus because we have the opportunity to analyze and measure search terms.This data can help drive other marketing campaigns. For instance, we can use data from site searches to serve meaningful messaging through email. If our FAQ page is frequently visited, we can create mini-Q&A email messages as part of a drip campaign. In another case, if “product warranty” is frequently queried, we can create a pay per click (PPC) campaign targeting product reliability to appeal to consumers who are concerned about that issue. #4. Leverage email activity in social campaigns We’re aware of how much email outperforms social media marketing in the pantheon of digital marketing. But, have you considered using email to support your social campaigns? Email is an intimate digital channel, giving us opportunities to connect one-to-one with no one else around. We can leverage email behaviors into social campaigns that can attract “lookalike” audiences. Email data such as open rates and click-through activity sheds light on what appeals to certain consumers. When we’re creating 360-degree consumer profiles, we should be folding in email data. Then we use that data to drive social campaigns. For instance, if a message offering a loyalty program generates a significant conversion rate, make that same offer through a social campaign. We can also create tag-along campaigns that build on a successful email campaign.   The point I am making is whereas there are some campaigns that can only be successful through specific channels, we shouldn’t silo the data we collect. When we think creatively about the data we capture, more opportunities evolve—and we end up getting more bang for the buck from our data collection practices. Author: Date Created:December 10, 2014 Date Published: Headline:4 Ways to Leverage Big Data across Campaigns Social Counts: Keywords: Publisher:Adobe Image:https://blogs.adobe.com/digitalmarketing/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/504481745-e1418135570269.jpg

Friends who have followed my posts know that I evangelize the use of Big Data to improve our digital marketing practices. We can leverage data across our Web properties, paid, owned, and earned media, and digital assets. We can test assets, create consumer profiles, target market segments, and determine campaign success based on data. Today, I want to discuss four tactics where we can leverage data to develop stronger cross-channel campaigns.

#1. Build loyalty from social influencers

We’re able to extract social data that reveals trending topics and key influencers who facilitate discussions through the myriad social channels. We can use this data to develop targeted loyalty programs for the most influential of social brands. Although we want to avoid becoming shameless “pay for play” suitors, we can effectively drive loyalty while expanding reach.

Luxury cosmetics retailer Lancôme, for example, recently launched a social loyalty campaign, offering rewards for brand engagement and sharing. The L’Oreal-owned division has seen a 60 percent monthly action rate since the program’s inception. In some cases, social rewards points for sharing outpace online shopping points by more than double.

We’ve got to be sharp when we target influencers through social channels. We can be more effective by targeting specific influencers (not simply existing customers), using data relevant to their number of followers, posting frequency, and follower engagement levels.

Marketing publisher Econsultancy offered a framework to allocate marketing spend by segmenting our social audience. Research has shown that only 3 percent of social media influencers contribute 90 percent of impact to a brand. This suggests we can deploy more efficient social campaigns by targeting a narrow segment of influencers. After analyzing social data, we can target those top-tier influencers and build campaigns that reward their impact, leveraging their unique influencing capabilities.

#2. Creating digital assets

There is an abundance of information we can analyze, organize, and leverage from consumer search and browsing activity. I’m not talking about metrics such as page visits and traffic sources, though. I’m referring to the content on the pages being visited—page elements such as color scheme, text, images, banners, and navigation buttons. Capturing and analyzing this data allows us to examine the potential effect of these elements on user actions.

From user activity metrics such as click-throughs, time on page, and others, we may be able to infer how appealing certain page content might be. For example, one particular color may be found to be more appealing than another based on page statistics.

When we discover potential impact features, we should then embed similar elements in other digital marketing campaigns. If certain terms, keywords, or images trigger user actions, then we should share those elements across other marketing assets such as email, landing pages, or print catalogs. What works in some venues may likely work in others.

#3. Respond to site search activity

Site search data also reveals ways in which we can deepen our relationships with prospects and customers. Whether they are at the top of the funnel or closer to conversion, consumers use our site search capabilities to research specific interests. Site search provides a more granular picture of our visitors than filtering menus because we have the opportunity to analyze and measure search terms.This data can help drive other marketing campaigns.

For instance, we can use data from site searches to serve meaningful messaging through email. If our FAQ page is frequently visited, we can create mini-Q&A email messages as part of a drip campaign. In another case, if “product warranty” is frequently queried, we can create a pay per click (PPC) campaign targeting product reliability to appeal to consumers who are concerned about that issue.

#4. Leverage email activity in social campaigns

We’re aware of how much email outperforms social media marketing in the pantheon of digital marketing. But, have you considered using email to support your social campaigns? Email is an intimate digital channel, giving us opportunities to connect one-to-one with no one else around. We can leverage email behaviors into social campaigns that can attract “lookalike” audiences.

Email data such as open rates and click-through activity sheds light on what appeals to certain consumers. When we’re creating 360-degree consumer profiles, we should be folding in email data. Then we use that data to drive social campaigns. For instance, if a message offering a loyalty program generates a significant conversion rate, make that same offer through a social campaign. We can also create tag-along campaigns that build on a successful email campaign.

 

The point I am making is whereas there are some campaigns that can only be successful through specific channels, we shouldn’t silo the data we collect. When we think creatively about the data we capture, more opportunities evolve—and we end up getting more bang for the buck from our data collection practices.