Flex Data Services, Hibernate and Eclipse – Mike Slinn book

A lot of books about Flash, Flex, ActionScript and Java are available on the market and some of them are really good – however there are still no comprehensive books related to Flex and Java integration – best practices, frameworks, performance issues, patterns and anti patterns. Mike book fills a gap here, talking especially about […]SHARETHIS.addEntry({ title: “Flex Data Services, Hibernate and Eclipse – Mike Slinn book”, url: “http://cornelcreanga.com/2009/10/flex-data-services-hibernate-and-eclipse-mike-slinn-book/” });

Enterprise Apps in the Cloud Just Got Better: Salseforce/Adobe Partnership

Today we announced an interesting partnership between Salesforce.com and Adobe. As Tim Anderson noted, there has always been a surface integration because Flash Builder could consume WSDL’s and Salesforce.com has always exposed them. But this goes quite a bit deeper. One, we’re working with the Salesforce.com team to make sure their IDE is completely integrated into ours. You’ll be able to get a combined Force.com and Flash Builder tool so you never have to switch environments to create Flex applications on top of the Force.com platform. The new tool exposes a new project type, the Force.com stratus type, and lets you automatically connect to the Force.com platform using a WSDL file. Then you can use the data features of Flash Builder to connect your data in the cloud with Flex components. It also has support out of the box for creating AIR applications that support online/offline synchronization.

The new tool and the partnership really simplify the process to connect to the Force.com platform so that you can focus more time on building a really great user interface that exposes those services. A “consumer-link” user experience is becoming more and more prevalent in the enterprise and is seeing a lot more demand. As ReadWriteWeb notes this is going to do a lot to help merge the consumer world of Flash with the enterprise back end of Force.com as well as some of our enterprise functionality in the form of LiveCycle Data Services. I think there are also some cool use cases here for integrating LiveCycle Collaboration Services. And of course the Force.com platform now gets access to over a million Flash developers who can target the cloud.

You can check out the video below for some getting started information. There is also a fantastic Force.com quickstart on Adobe’s Developer Connection and a lot of other information on the Force.com section of Devnet. Finally there will be a live webinar on November 3rd with James Ward and Markus Spohn where you can get a demo and then ask questions about how it all fits together.

Adobe and Salesforce.com Unite RIA and The Cloud

The two major trends transforming software right now are Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) and Cloud Computing / Software as a Service (SaaS or PaaS). These trends are driven by two needs:

Full client capabilities which allow software to perform optimally and increase usability

Easy deployment which allows developers to focus on business needs instead of building […]

Adobe and Salesforce.com Join Forces to Advance Application Development in the Cloud

Today we announced the partnership between Salesforce.com and Adobe. The new offering, Adobe Flash Builder for Force.com is a jointly developed IDE that provides a single, powerful tool for building cloud-based RIAs, which can easily be deployed to end users through the browser using Adobe Flash Player or directly to the desktop via Adobe AIR. This tight integration enables client-side data management and synchronization between cloud and client, simplifying the development of applications that seamlessly run online or offline across operating systems and devices, while taking full advantage of the proven scalability, security and reliability of the Force.com platform.

As a developer, you’ll be able to get a combined Force.com and Flash Builder tool so you never have to switch environments to create Flex applications on top of the Force.com platform. The new tool exposes a new project type, the Force.com stratus type, and lets you automatically 

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-font-family:Calibri;}

connect your applications to the Force.com
platform using a WSDL file
. Then you can use the data features of Flash Builder to connect your data in the cloud with Flex components. It also has support out of the box for creating AIR applications that support online/offline synchronization and LiveCycle Data Services integration.

You can check out the video below for some getting started information. There is also a fantastic Force.com quickstart on Adobe’s Developer Connection and a lot of other information on the Force.com section of Devnet. Finally there will be a live webinar on November 3rd with James Ward and Markus Spohn where you can see a demo and then ask questions about how it all fits together.

The new tool and the partnership really simplify the process of connecting your Flex apps to the Force.com platform so that you can focus more time on building a really great user interface that exposes those services. We’re looking forward to seeing what kinds of applications you create with the Flash Platform and Force.com.

Adobe User Group Czech Republic is one of the biggest in Europe

I know that not every user group is maintaining their members and flow on Adobe Groups. Although I see big success of enormous effort done by folks in Czech Republic, where I am based.
Adobe User Group Czech Republic is currently sixth biggest user group in Europe according to Adobe Groups website with 150 registered members.

(AUG […]

Mini-Microsoft Interested in Adobe AIR

Kevin Goldsmith pointed this out and I thought it was awesome. For those not familiar with Mini-Microsoft, he’s (she?) is a highish level Microsoft employee who blogs anonymously about what’s happening at the company. He has a ton of insight about what’s going on over in Redmond and quite a bit of opinion about how things should be. My Microsoft employee friends love him. On Tuesday he did a breakdown of Microsoft’s quarterly numbers and what the status of various parts of the company are. The gem came when he talked about Dev Div (which I think stands for Developer Division), the part of the company with the developer tools and technology. Here’s the quote:

Dev Div: If I had to sit down tomorrow and write a casual application for the PC, my mind would fork itself in about five different directions. Native with ATL? WPF? Silverlight? An HTA? And what’s up with XNA? If I want to write an app for the Zune (which Zune?) what do I do? And can it run on some future mobile device? And the PC? And Xbox?

And how do I share it? How do I sell it? And, ah, crap, you mean you just released a whole new version of C# / Silverlight / XNA that I have to go and relearn? Maybe those free Starbucks coffee dispensers wasn’t a good idea…

If anything, I’d probably be pretty damn tempted to invest time learning Adobe AIR. And I’m thinking that while smack dab in the middle of the Microsoft bubble. There are a lot of Partners in Dev Div, and I’m not seeing any benefit from their concentration. The Windows client should be the premiere development platform. It’s not. What am I missing?

Mini, if you want to learn AIR, you can drop me an email. I’ll drive over to Redmond or even meet you secretly at the Adobe offices here in Fremont and show you the ropes. Anytime :)