Project Primetime to Enable a Single Video Publishing Workflow, Starting with Adobe Access for iOS and MPEG-Dash Support

As part of the quickly evolving device landscape, a unified video publishing workflow is more important than ever. Individual workflows for specific devices or platforms are not a long-term approach. It’s like having to build a different car, depending on the city you want to travel to. It’s expensive and distracts from the important part of your video application, the user experience.

As part of Project Primetime, we are continuing to invest in our own technology and industry standards that enable our video customers to have a single workflow that enables them to reach any web-enabled devices.

What does this mean for you? Instead of having to worry about using different content protection, video delivery or video publishing workflows, Project Primetime will provide a holistic solution, which will make your video strategy uniquely easy to deploy, protect and monetize.

We’re making two announcements today that will bring the industry towards a single video publishing workflow:

Adobe Access for native iOS applications

Adobe Access, our robust Digital Rights Management technology, will support native iOS applications.  With Adobe Access’ existing support for desktop (99% reach via Flash Player), Android (via AIR 3.0) and Smart TVs (via AIR for TV 2.5), video publishers can now reach a huge digital audience with a single content protection solution.

Here’s how it works: Adobe provides an Adobe Access DRM library that can be integrated into your native iOS application.  You build your experience using the Apple SDK, add the Adobe Access library as a component, and deliver through the Apple App Store. The Adobe Access DRM library provides all the necessary robustness. The video content is streamed using Apple’s HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) protocol, and Adobe Access provides the content protection required by studios.

MPEG-DASH support

We are announcing that our streaming technologies will support the emerging standard MPEG-DASH. It will provide the reach and flexibility required for a unified video workflow. It will not replace, but provide additional reach to existing Adobe streaming protocols. You can read more about our announcement here.

We are very excited about these announcements, which are first steps to provide a unified video publishing workflow that will offer the best reach, protection and monetization for video content.

Flash to Focus on PC Browsing and Mobile Apps; Adobe to More Aggressively Contribute to HTML5

[Also posted on Adobe's Conversations Blog]

Adobe is all about enabling designers and developers to create the most expressive content possible, regardless of platform or technology. For more than a decade, Flash has enabled the richest content to be created and deployed on the web by reaching beyond what browsers could do. It has repeatedly served as a blueprint for standardizing new technologies in HTML.  Over the past two years, we’ve delivered Flash Player for mobile browsers and brought the full expressiveness of the web to many mobile devices.

However, HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively.  This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms. We are excited about this, and will continue our work with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM, to drive HTML5 innovation they can use to advance their mobile browsers.

Our future work with Flash on mobile devices will be focused on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores.  We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook.  We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations.  We will also allow our source code licensees to continue working on and release their own implementations.

These changes will allow us to increase investment in HTML5 and innovate with Flash where it can have most impact for the industry, including advanced gaming and premium video.  Flash Player 11 for PC browsers just introduced dozens of new features, including hardware accelerated 3D graphics for console-quality gaming and premium HD video with content protection.  Flash developers can take advantage of these features, and all that our Flash tooling has to offer, to reach more than a billion PCs through their browsers and to package native apps with AIR that run on hundreds of millions of mobile devices through all the popular app stores, including the iTunes App Store, Android Market, Amazon Appstore for Android and BlackBerry App World.

We are already working on Flash Player 12 and a new round of exciting features which we expect to again advance what is possible for delivering high definition entertainment experiences.  We will continue to leverage our experience with Flash to accelerate our work with the W3C and WebKit to bring similar capabilities to HTML5 as quickly as possible, just as we have done with CSS Shaders.  And, we will design new features in Flash for a smooth transition to HTML5 as the standards evolve so developers can confidently invest knowing their skills will continue to be leveraged.

We are super excited about the next generations of HTML5 and Flash.  Together they offer developers and content publishers great options for delivering compelling web and application experiences across PCs and devices.  There is already amazing work being done that is pushing the newest boundaries, and we can’t wait to see what is still yet to come!

Danny Winokur is the Vice President and General Manager of Interactive Development at Adobe

 

[UPDATED: 11/15/11 at 6:40 p.m. PT]

Read these related posts from Adobe’s Ben Forta, Thibault Imbert, Lee Brimelow, Pritham Shetty, Mike Chambers, Andrew Shorten and Deepa Subramaniam:

Some Thoughts on Flash and Devices
By Ben Forta
http://forta.com/blog/index.cfm/2011/11/9/Some-Thoughts-On-Flash-And-Devices

Adobe AIR and Flash Player Team Blog- Focusing
By Thibault Imbert
https://blogs.adobe.com/flashplayer/2011/11/focusing.html

Flash to Focus on Apps for Mobile
By Lee Brimelow
http://www.leebrimelow.com/?p=3151

Adobe Flash for Premium Video
By Pritham Shetty
http://blogs.adobe.com/ktowes/2011/11/adobe-flash-for-premium-video.html

Flash Professional and the Future
By Mike Chambers
http://www.mikechambers.com/blog/2011/11/10/flash-professional-and-the-future

Clarifications on Flash Player for Mobile Browsers, the Flash Platform, and the Future of Flash
By Mike Chambers
http://www.mikechambers.com/blog/2011/11/11/clarifications-on-flash-player-for-mobile-browsers-the-flash-platform-and-the-future-of-flash/

Your Questions about Flex (UPDATED: 11/15/11)
By Andrew Shorten & Deepa Subramaniam
http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html

 

 

Announcing Flash Player 11 and AIR 3

Today, we’re excited to announce that Adobe Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 will be launching in early October. These milestone releases introduce the next generation of the technologies that deliver stunning content and apps to over a billion people — across screens including Android, iPhone, iPad, BlackBerry PlayBook, Windows, Mac, and connected TV devices — pushing the boundaries of what’s possible on the web.

Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 take these even further by introducing Stage 3D, a new architecture for hardware accelerated graphics rendering that delivers 1000x faster rendering performance over Flash Player 10. It enables new classes of console-quality games and immersive apps, such as Tanki Online and Zombie Tycoon (see videos below). Stage 3D enables content that efficiently animate millions of objects on screen, smoothly rendered at 60 frames per second — the result is fluid, cinematic app and game experiences. Additionally, these releases deliver new features to support theater-quality HD video, native 64-bit optimizations, high-quality HD video conferencing, and a powerful, flexible architecture for leveraging native device and platform capabilities. We’re turning the dial up.

 

Building Blocks

Flash began with a few bits of colored plastic, inspired by experiences of playing with LEGOs as kids. Over 15 years, Flash has provided some of the most creative building blocks for designers and developers, pushing innovation and helping the web to evolve and iterate at a rapid pace defined by creativity. Flash made fluid animation an integral part of the web, defining our modern expectations for smooth, animated user interfaces. And since then, Flash has made features such as rich typography, beautiful interfaces leveraging dynamic vector and raster graphics, dynamic synchronized audio playback, advanced scripting, and seamless HD video mainstream — not just as experiments waiting to reach the world, but capabilities accessible to virtually every connected computer on the Internet. Many of the capabilities that Flash pioneered have over time moved into web standards and browsers, and will continue to do so as Adobe works closely with the web standards community and continues to develop products that support and advance HTML5. Piece by piece, Flash has enhanced and upgraded what’s possible for over a billion people on web, and Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 continue that tradition.

The Next-Generation Console Has Arrived

Today, approximately 70% of web games are powered by Flash, along with 9 of the top 10 games on Facebook, about 70% of the games on Google+, and the top social games from companies like Zynga and EA. Games at their best are fluid, immersive experiences, and the unmatched consistency of Flash Player allows game developers to focus on making great games rather than fight fragmented technology. Games just play. And play big: Flash Player brings an audience over 11 times larger than that of the best-selling current generation game console.

Flash Player 11 is the next-generation console for the web: now with Stage 3D (codenamed “Molehill”), it provides a consistent platform for gorgeous games and rich engaging content — hundreds of millions of users will be able to instantly upgrade to a whole new level of games on the web with a simple update, ready to experience amazing games using Stage 3D when they come to market later this year and early 2012. With stunning hardware accelerated graphics, mature dynamic audio, immersive full screen, native support for mouse/multi-touch/camera input, low-latency peer-to-peer multiplayer networking, full HD 1080p video playback, and high-quality voice chat, Flash Player provides the building blocks for incredible games.

Everyone wins. Content using the new Stage 3D APIs will automatically take advantage of modern GPU hardware, from integrated graphics chips to the most advanced high-end graphics cards, to provide incredibly fluid graphics — and Stage 3D also provides accelerated software rendering for content on older computers (yep, even mom’s old PC with Windows XP), where it runs up to 2-10x faster than software rendering in Flash Player 10. In other words, all computers with Flash Player 11 can benefit from the accelerated performance of Stage 3D. And game publishers can also package their Flash technology-based apps using AIR to deliver them across Android, iPhone, iPad, BlackBerry PlayBook, Windows, Mac, and connected TV devices. To learn about some of the benefits of the Flash Platform for game publishers, check out the new Adobe Gaming Solutions page at www.adobe.com/go/gaming.

Hear more about the Stage 3D accelerated graphics architecture from the Flash Runtime team:

Adoption of new Flash Player releases has been accelerating — nearly half of the web upgrades Flash Player within four weeks of a new release — so websites can expect that many of the over 1 billion people with Flash Player will be able to reap the benefits of Stage 3D soon, bringing modern GPU hardware acceleration to more people on the web than any other technology. The efficient Stage 3D architecture was designed from the ground up with resource-constrained mobile devices in mind — the full, optimized rendering model will be supported on smartphones and tablets as well, and we’re making this support available in a private prerelease.

Combined with high-level graphics frameworks built on Stage 3D, including a range of specialized, optimized third-party graphics frameworks and game engines, Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 make incredible graphics performance everywhere accessible to a range of developers, whether they’re building rich 3D visualization apps or sophisticated, expressive games. Some of these great frameworks include Alternativa 3D, Away 3D, Flare 3D, Minko, and Yogurt 3D. Adobe will also soon make a 3D framework technology preview called Proscenium available on Adobe Labs. Proscenium will allow developers using Flash Builder to rapidly prototype experiences focused on simple content interaction and display, whether for simple games, visualization, or high-quality rendering of small object collections.

And we’re especially delighted to announce Starling, a flexible, lightweight framework for 2D graphics and animation that combines the simplicity of Flash with the incredible power of modern hardware accelerated graphics provided by Stage 3D. The Starling Framework is a free and open source ActionScript library designed to be instantly familiar to developers and designers using the traditional Flash display list. Starling and Stage 3D in Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 enable easy intuitive GPU-accelerated graphics programming for everyone. Beautiful is now simple.

Particle effects with Starling and Stage 3D in Flash Player 11:

Rolling Forward

We’ve seen lots of momentum with Flash Player and AIR, especially in these areas:

Gaming: Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 allow game publishers to instantly deliver engaging games to anyone with a PC, tablet, smartphone, or connected TV. And with Stage 3D, game publishers and developers can take their games to a new level, creating new opportunities for game developers and publishers to deliver and monetize their content. Two of the many upcoming games leveraging Stage 3D include Tanki Online and Ultimate Race Championship.

To experience a tablet game with Flash today, check out Machinarium, an award-winning puzzle and adventure game for the iPad 2 that within one day became the #1 game on iTunes in the U.S. and 12 other countries, #1 app overall, and “iPad Game of the Week” — and it’s coming soon for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook (play a demo right in your browser with Flash Player). Visit the Flash Game Technology Center to learn more about building games with Flash. And check out this short video on Machinarium and upcoming Stage 3D -enabled content

Rich media and premium video: Leading content providers, including Amazon, ESPN, HBO, Hulu, and YouTube, deliver premium HD live video and video on demand (VoD) using Flash technology to reach multiple screens, while benefiting from adaptive streaming, content protection, smooth hardware-accelerated HD video playback, and expanded audiences with Adobe Pass for TV Everywhere. Even the animals are in on it: the California Academy of Sciences uses Flash to share a waddle of cuteness with the Pocket Penguins app for Android and iPhone.

Data-driven apps: Flash enables highly interactive, collaborative applications across devices and distribution channels. Using Flash and AIR, the St. Petersburg Times delivered the PolitiFact app on the Apple App Store, Android Market, and BlackBerry App World — a #1 paid news app on iTunes.

 

Snapping Key Pieces in Place

Some of the other benefits coming with Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 include:

A fully modern architecture. Flash Player 11 delivers full native 64-bit support for 64-bit browsers on Linux, Mac OS, and Windows, while also leveraging advanced processor optimizations to deliver additional performance.

Uncompromised experiences everywhere. Native extensions in AIR 3 allow developers to take advantage of existing native code libraries and deep native hardware and OS capabilities, such as sensors (gyroscopes, magnetometers, light sensors, etc.), multiple screens, native in-app payments, haptic/vibration control, device status, and Near Field Communications (NFC).

Simple, instant app install. Developers can package their apps with AIR 3 as a captive runtime for one-click, seamless installs on Android, Windows, and Mac OS (in addition to iOS) without any additional runtime download.

And there are dozens more new capabilities in Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 that web and app developers will be able to take advantage of to create beautiful new experiences. Check out our press release and Labs release notes to see the complete list of what’s new, and we’ll be highlighting more of these features in the future (and even more at Adobe MAX). We look forward to delivering the release versions in early October, and if you want to get your hands on them now, you can download the release candidate versions from Adobe Labs today. With Flash Player 11 and AIR 3, we’re providing some amazing new building blocks. We’re thrilled to see what you create with them.

pipelinersales.com Uses the Flash Platform to Reinvent the Sales Cycle

pipelinersales.com wanted to create a tool with sales professionals in mind where the user controls the sales system (not the other way around). The result was a unique enterprise platform built with the Adobe Flash Platform called pipeliner. This solution changes the way salespeople manage their pipelines and conduct business while extending traditional customer relationship management (CRM) systems.

The company wanted to develop a product that worked across different operating systems and devices, regardless of Internet connectivity, which is where Adobe AIR came into play. As an AIR application, pipeliner lets sales teams manage their pipeline online or offline, from a variety of devices, giving users a better perspective of customer relationships, activities and opportunities through an interactive and user-friendly interface.

By putting the Flash Platform into action, this new sales pipeline management tool allows for faster data input and aggregation, shortened development cycles across platforms, online/offline data access and synchronized data from Web and server-based sources.

Check out how Adobe and pipelinersales.com worked together to create a product where the freedom of choice and responsibility is in the user’s hands.

Interactive Storytelling Using the Flash Platform

Combining the magic of a classic story book with Adobe technology, Made in Me, a U.K.-based educational multimedia publishing company, has created an interactive, digital learning experience for kids with the “The Land of Me” story book. Built with Adobe Flash Platform and Creative Suite technologies and a 2010 MAX Awards finalist, “The Land of Me” story book engages children and parents with an imaginative world filled with colorful creatures, exciting adventures and learning around every corner.

Adobe AIR was a key component in developing the story book as Made in Me didn’t want it to be browser-based. With AIR, the creators marketed the story into downloadable parts, providing strong revenue to the company.  As a result, Made in Me’s sales have doubled month to month since its startup. AIR also allowed the creators to easily extend “The Land of Me” to other platforms, devices and screens while offering offline viewing functionality. Made in Me’s story book has gained some buzz in the UK – from getting the attention of the BBC to having several local preschools launch pilot programs based on its educational value.

Check out the video below for a sneak peek of “The Land of Me.” The first chapter is downloadable for free with additional chapters available for purchase on Made in Me’s site. You can learn more about how Made in Me used Adobe technologies to develop the story book here.

The Land of Me – Shape, Size & Colour from Made in Me on Vimeo.

Flash and AIR Momentum from Mobile World Congress 2011

We’re stirring up Flash Platform buzz at Mobile World Congress (MWC) this week by announcing strong mobile adoption of Flash Player and Adobe AIR, plus performance enhancements with Flash Player 10.2 to benefit developers and content publishers. Some highlights:

  • AIR applications can now be deployed to more than 84 million smartphones and tablets running Android and iOS.
  • Thousands of applications have been created and made available on Android Market and Apple’s App Store to date. For examples of popular AIR applications for Android check out m.flash.com.
  • Over 20 million smartphones were shipped or upgraded with Flash Player 10.1 on more than 35 certified devices in the first six months following the launch.
  • With more than 6 million downloads to date and more than 150,000 users giving it a 4.5-out-of-5 star rating, Flash Player is one of the top free apps on the Android Market.

Also, Flash Player 10.2 is now available for Mac, Windows and Linux users with several performance enhancements. The biggest feature of this release is support for Stage Video, which offers much improved video performance by optimizing hardware acceleration on desktops, mobile devices and TVs. Test results show up to 80 percent CPU savings when playing back video in 1080p on Windows and Mac OS—and existing H.264 video content on the Web will benefit from Stage Video without any changes to the content. Stage Video support for mobile devices will be available on Android 3.0 “Honeycomb” and BlackBerry Tablet OS.

Adobe also announced that leading global publishers, like National Geographic, Dennis Publishing, Martha Stewart Living and Condé Nast, are using Adobe Digital Publishing Suite tools to create and distribute their magazines and newspapers on Android tablets. The Content Viewer for Android is available now for publishing customers through the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite pre-release program.

Flash Platform developments don’t stop at MWC – the year ahead looks bright:

  • By the end of 2011, Adobe expects more than 200 million smartphones and tablets to support Adobe AIR applications.
  • For 2011, the company expects Flash Player to be supported on more than 132 million units worldwide.
  • More than 50 tablets are expected to support Flash Player this year alone.
  • Using Creative Suite 5 tools, over 3 million Flash Platform developers can create content across many devices for both Flash Player and AIR.

Watch David Wadhwani, senior vice president, discuss Flash Player and AIR momentum in 2011:

Watch Danny Winokur, vice president, discuss Flash Player 10.2 including Stage Video and performance updates, and upcoming 3D functionality:

Are you in Barcelona at MWC, and taking video you’d like to share? Send us an e-mail and maybe we‘ll cut it into our highlight reel.

Our partners are busy with the Flash Platform as well. Check back this week for links to some of their news…

Multi-screen medical device simulation

Christoph Ketzler, who works at Innovation Mecom, was one of the developers behind this great example of how Flash simplifies multi-screen development. Innovation Mecom developed a simulation for training and marketing of Carina, a medical device. The application is built on top of the Flash Platform using ActionScript3.0 and simulates all the functions of the [...]

Flash Builder Profiler – Fixing Memory Leak on ExternalInterface

One of the most common problems with Flash applications are memory leaks, programming flaws that cause Flash Player to loose access to memory that it could recycle otherwise.  In the mobile space it’s crucial to understand memory management to get the most out of the Flash Player, and ultimately to ensure a smooth ride for your consumers.

Flash Player memory management

Flash Player makes use of automatic memory management, to help you to create applications with ease and with less code. In fact the Flash Player uses a pretty simple mechanism that determines how many times you have referenced a particular object. Once an object has nothing referencing it then it can be garbage collected – predictably it’s called “reference counting”.

The following is a great example of reference counting in action, notice that I have created a Geolocation object (geo) and added updateHandler as a listener function for update events.  This counts as a reference against updateHandler:

var geo:Geolocation = new Geolocation();
geo.addEventListener(GeolocationEvent.UPDATE, updateHandler);

function updateHandler(event:GeolocationEvent):void
{
geo=null;
trace(event.longitude);
}

The updateHandler function marks the location object null, tagging it for deletion by the garbage collector which is great.  The problem is that the location object still has a reference to updateHandler, and therefore the location object cannot be deleted until that function looks like this:

function updateHandler(event:GeolocationEvent):void
{
geo.removeEventListener(GeolocationEvent.UPDATE, updateHandler);
geo=null;
trace(event.longitude);
}

Memory leaks are easy to create in Flash, and even harder to debug later.  It’s therefore essentially to build your applications with memory in mind and use all tools at your disposal to keep checking for leaks, slow performance, and run away code.

Flash Builder Profiler

Flash Builder 4 ships with a new feature called the Profiler and in the video below I’ll show you how to use it to solve a memory leak.  Now don’t be fooled, this memory leak took a few hours to solve in reality – these aren’t easy problems to solve.

In fact I found two memory leaks, the first is the ExternalInterface.addCallback holding onto a function reference.  The other is more complex, and I have marked it “Flash Player Bug” as I believe this is a problem with the runtime itself.

EVA on Android – App in a Week

I have just completed my App in a Week session on targeting Mobile and Devices, as promised, here are the source files for EVA on Android.  So that you don’t get lost in the huge swathe of code let’s run through some of the features to get you started.

If you missed todays session you can catch it here and view the running application here.

Setup:

Get Flash Pro CS5

Get Flash Builder 4

Get AIR on Android extension

Target Multiple Screens:

The goal of this application was to target Android devices running AIR, or indeed the Flash Player running in mobile browsers.  So it was important to include some pointers on how to dynamically layout the application.

I chose to implement two pretty simple examples of how to do this using the widgetComponent and the footerMenu.  In the Application class I listen to the “Event.RESIZE” event through the doLayout function.  As you stretch the SWF (use the standalone player) you can see the widgetComponent always displays in the middle, the footerMenu will always be at the bottom.

Of course the menu, widgets and background should all change dynamically.  This won’t require a huge set of changes and as you can see it’s quite simple to control the layout.  In a later build I will investigate a more dynamic approach to laying out the UI.

PHP+MySQL Backend

To demonstrate the data-centric features of Flash Builder, Mihai and Piotr created a database with PHP services that describe common Evangelist activities as well as data about us.  In the mobile demo I have coded as few of these database interactions in the UsersService class:

  • “UsersService.getByUsername” – Is used to login and returns an object with user details including their name, photo url etc
  • “UsersService.setLocation” – Is used to store the lastest location after login, this is then synchronized with other Evangelists.

I have created a User object to represent the user of the service, this class also manages the loading of the user image using ContentLoader.  The primary function of ContentLoader is to abstract the loading of SWF/image files, handling the various possible error cases.

User Location

An interesting new feature of Adobe AIR on Android is the ability to use the GPS hardware to get an accurate location fix.  Although EVA was designed to run inside, or outside of the browser and as such I have built a few fallbacks.

When the application is running in the browser (Capabilities.playerType==”PlugIn”) I have used an HTML5 feature to get the location.  This is achieved by using the ExternalInterface class, a bridge that Flash uses to communicate with Javascript.

In addition to these two approaches I have also deployed the MaxMind GeoIP service on my blog.  This is a huge database of IP addresses that can be used to determine an approximate location, usually your nearest city.  This is used when the application is running in standalone mode for debugging purposes, or as a failure fallback.

Using each of these methods I can reverse geocode the latitude and longitude to discover the users current location.  The UI displays the current city and country.  The open geonames database is an incredible free webservices that cover all manner of data, I couldn’t have wished for more.

Local Weather

One of the more interesting features of the application is the local weather service.  There are only two services that can produce weather data for a give latitude and longitude, and those are Geonames and Google Weather.

I chose Google because it comes with the added bonus of providing a weather icon to display.  Unfortunately this icon isn’t up to the quality of Serge’s design and so I ultimately swap it out, but at least I can easily change the URL.

The most fun part was easily finding a piece of code that calculates the Sunset (SunriseSunset.as).  I was able to find and port a piece of JavaScript code that does the trick, although annoyingly I cannot find the author to thank them.  Using this I can swap in the night icons for weather, nice :-)

Flash Settings:

  • The stage is running in low quality mode – perfect for use with device fonts
  • Layers have been minimized and flattened as much as possible
  • The Frame rate of the application is 15FPS – as low as possible

Asset Optimizations:

  • The EVA background is an 8KB PNG-8 128
  • All other images are mobile optimized PNG-8 128 Dithered and under 4KB
  • Bitmap caching is not used, the application is relatively static
  • Special care has been taken to ensure that all assets are snapped to pixels (not 23.43 etc)
  • No assets are loaded off stage and nothing is invisible, ever – if they are unused, then they are unloaded
  • All assets use “Sprite” as their base class, as set in the properties panel in Flash Professional

Text Optimizations:

  • TLF is not used anywhere due to performance and size issues
  • Only device fonts are used, they perform and render much better

Flex:

  • Flex is not used due to the overhead of the framework on devices.

In later blog posts I will discuss the Widgets in more depth, including the Social and Radar widgets.  It’s also worth noting that Tom did a great job to deliver his P2P widget ready for integration, amazingly within 12kb!

DOWNLOAD

Introducing: Buzzr: a multi-user, multi-platform quiz game

This idea has been in my head for quite some time. I actually came up with it when I was building the demo for my MAX keynote appearance last October. I just never found the time to actually build it but I started on it this week.
The idea is simple. You open up a browser, [...]