Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Creating digital learning content to create more successful students

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It happens at every school, every day. Whether their attention wanders or they just don’t understand a particular concept or lesson, students often miss out on learning key information during class. The consequences can build quickly, as the failure to learn one concept impedes learning the next, academic progress begins to slip, and the students become anxious and frustrated.

So how can educators make sure that students stay on track with their learning at all times?

Renaldo Lawrence may very well have the answer. An Adobe Education Leader and Lynda.com Author, Renaldo is also an Advanced Skills teacher responsible for creating eLearning content for Chiswick School of London. He works in partnership with Chiswick’s teachers to digitize parts of their curriculums using Adobe Creative Cloud software. As a result, Chiswick students can easily access syllabi, lesson plans, books, multimedia lessons, teacher videos, presentation slides, and more from their home computers, tablets, and mobile phones.

“Not every student understands a lesson the first time it’s presented,” says Renaldo. “But with these materials supplementing their classroom learning, students can always go back and revisit whatever they’ve missed.”

For projects like Chiswick’s , Renaldo uses Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Audition CC to edit videos, After Effects CC to create animations, Adobe Muse CC or Dreamweaver CC to design and develop websites, and Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and Fireworks CC to create graphics.

“What I love about Adobe products is the consistency — they all look similar, so you can learn one if you’ve learned another,” he says. “And Adobe keeps adding features that make them easier to use.”

He also appreciates the integration between the products. “The roundtripping is incredible,” he says. “I can edit a video in Premiere Pro, send it into After Effects to work on the imagery, and then quickly bring it back to Premiere Pro. And I can create storyboards in Adobe Experience Design CC right on my iPad to show teachers what their learning materials will look like, save the storyboards to Creative Cloud, and then open them on my desktop later to refine them.”

Renaldo and Chiswick School are getting students involved in media-making, too. They’ve created Chelsea Digital Camp — a day of fun and learning in which students tour Chelsea Football Club’s Stamford Bridge stadium, meet some of the team’s players, play soccer, and create their own videos of the experience using the Adobe Premiere Clip mobile app.

“The students gain so many benefits from learning to create digital media,” says Renaldo. “It prepares them for careers, develops their communication skills, builds their confidence, and helps them find their unique voices.” He is now planning a similar camp to teach Chiswick’s teachers how to create their own digital learning content.

“By supplementing classroom learning with digital learning, we help our students succeed,” says Renaldo. “They no longer go home and tell their parents, ‘I don’t know what I’m supposed to do,’ because it’s all available to them. And parents can access all of the materials, too, to support their children’s learning.”

 

Teacher resources from Renaldo Lawrence

Webinar: In My Creative Classroom with Renaldo Lawrence

Adobe Education Exchange learning content for teachers

Lynda.com learning content

Blog post: Top 10 tips for turning curriculums into interactive learning experiences

Chiswick School Interactive Media Design coursework and mobile learning samples

 

 

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Professor Penny Ann Dolin Ushers the Next Generation of Creative Technologists into the Workforce

Penny Ann DolinDolin_smedia, an Associate Professor of Practice at Arizona State University, in the Graphic Information Technology program, recently shared her experiences with how Adobe Creative Cloud enables her students to become relevant and employable in the workforce upon graduating.

Penny’s focus is instructing students in the creation of visual content with a commercial output. The commercial focus of GIT distinguishes it from a regular Fine Arts program, but creativity is sill a top priority within the major. Penny affectionately calls her students “Creative Technologists” because they seamlessly combine the two schools of thought (digital creativity and current technology).

Within the GIT program, in addition to general business knowledge, students learn skills such as graphic design, photography, web design, videography, and animation. Penny specifically calls out the emergence of 2D/3D motion graphic design as an important skill-set to have in the industry, and how Adobe After Effects has been instrumental in preparing her students for that job requirement.

Due to having access to all the tools offered within Creative Cloud, students are able to learn a wide breadth of skills that will make them more competitive in the work force. Graduates from Arizona’s GIT program have gone on to work as Art Directors, UX designers, Videographers, Production Managers, and more, at some of the most respected companies in the world.

Penny asserts that her students have gained a jump-start using Adobe Creative Cloud. She urges other teachers: “If you’re [teaching grades] K-12, these programs are extremely important, because by the time they get to a program like ours  it gives them a real head-start”.

“If we equip our students with the best tools so that they can hit the ground running, then we feel like we’ve done our job”.

Other helpful links:

 

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Inspiring Creative Catalyst Conference

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Did you miss the Creative Catalyst Conference?  Watch the conference recordings!

Creativity is for everyone and it’s the pathway to helping make the world a better place. Adobe is providing programs to help educators foster creativity with their students like the Sparking Creative Catalyst virtual Conference which was held in July.  The conference focused on best practices in teaching and learning with technology and professional development sessions on leadership, establishing a social profile and digital storytelling bootcamp. During the conference, Adobe Education Leaders and the Adobe Youth Voices partners joined together  to inspire and motivate change to support creativity in education.  To help reach educators around the world, select sessions were available for a virtual audience and now these session are available by recording.

Check out these inspirational keynote sessions:

Michael Gough, Adobe VP of Product Experience, discusses how drawing helps you approach problem solving in new ways and makes the case for drawing as a kind of literacy all of us should purse.  Watch his session: Drawing – The New Literacy

Erik Natzke, Adobe Principal Designer, shared an inspiring session on the creative application of education to have play inspire learning and vice versa.  Watch his session: Creative Application of Education

Andy Lauta, Adobe Photoshop 3D Printing Evangelist, shared the amazing results of 3D printing with Photoshop and inspired all to want to have their own mini me.  Watch his session: 3D Printing in Photoshop CC

The full agenda of recorded sessions and their descriptions my be found here.

 

Related links:

Read the press release demonstrating Adobe’s recent commitment to help advance digital learning and teaching, across 15,000 schools in the United States through ConnectEd.

Discover more on the Adobe Education Exchange.

Become inspired by Adobe Education Leaders student projects. Go to the Adobe Education Leaders Gallery and share or appreciate your favorite AEL projects!

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Sparking Creative Catalysts

Educators are invited to attend the Adobe Education Virtual Conference July 21 – 22, 2014

Join us! Adobe Education is thrilled to invite educators to come together, to learn more about Adobe’s role in education and to spark change through creativity. Hear from the Adobe Education Leaders from around the world, and dialogue with fellow educators. Participate in open discussions on best practices in teaching and learning with technology, and take advantage of free professional development.

The Sparking Creative Catalysts Virtual Conference will help you:

  • Learn how Adobe Creative Cloud is integrated into classrooms.
  • Hear the latest about Adobe technology from Adobe Executives and Product Managers.
  • Take online courses in leadership, learn how to establish a social profile, attend a digital storytelling bootcamp, and much more.
  • Find out about the Adobe ConnectED program in the US and help make a difference at a Title 1 school!

Register to attend here!
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Related links:
Read the press release demonstrating Adobe’s recent commitment to help advance digital learning and teaching, across 15,000 schools in the United States through ConnectEd.

Discover more on the Adobe Education Exchange.

Become inspired by Adobe Education Leaders student projects. Go to the Adobe Education Leaders Gallery and share or appreciate your favorite AEL projects!

4:48 PM Permalink

Adobe Encourages Young Girls to Consider Careers in Technology

techgirlsToday, the world needs creative thinkers to help solve the big challenges we face — in our global economy, in our environment, and in social issues. And we need people who are fluent in the latest digital tools that fuel creativity and self-expression. To inspire young women and help them develop skills they will need to become future problem solvers and innovators, Adobe Education hosted a special Tech Girls event at Presentation High School in San Jose, CA. A group of girls, ages 11 to 14, came from all over Silicon Valley to learn how to use Adobe tools including Adobe Edge Animate and Adobe Muse in a series of workshops. Mala Sharma, vice president of GTM and strategy for Creative Pro and Education at Adobe, spoke to these young women about her background and encouraged them to consider careers in technology.

The workshops were led by Adobe Education Leaders; Deila Caballero of Presentation High School, Jeff Larson of Balboa High School in San Francisco and Kevin McMahon of Bellarmine College Prep. All of the presenters were impressed by the knowledge and talent of these young women and praised Tech Girls for providing youth with such amazing opportunities:

“Workshops like this one directly impact the future of STEM fields by planting the seeds of technological inspiration in the minds of today’s young women. By encouraging each generation of girls to be fearless and confident technology users we give them a chance to explore educational opportunities which they may not otherwise have in the standard education model. The best part of this event was watching each student explore a new technology with excitement, creativity and success.” Deila Caballero, Presentation High School, San Jose, CA

“Having the chance to teach Adobe Edge to the young ladies involved in the Tech Girls workshop was a delightful reminder of the capacity of young people to rapidly learn and work with technology. The girls were quick to pick up on the general workflow and then quickly move into discovering things about the software I wasn’t even sure we’d have time to cover. I hope my daughter has a chance to participate in something like the Tech Girls program at some point, as the program is a beacon for encouraging girls pursuit of STEM related interests.” Jeff Larson, Balboa High School, San Francisco, CA

“The Tech Girls Workshop was a great experience. When teaching new apps such as Muse and Edge, students usually require some adjustment period. But these bright young girls were almost finishing my sentences by the time we were done. Moreover, their website and animation work was quite impressive. As a father of a daughter, the Tech Girls program gives me great hope for the future.” Kevin McMahon of Bellarmine College Prep, San Jose, CA

This is just one way Adobe is getting involved in helping youth explore new opportunities through technology and innovation. Share with us how your work inspires kids in new and creative ways.

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