2017/09/21

Adobe Spark – Branded Stories

You can now brand your Spark Pages with your own logos, colors, and fonts. If you are a paid Creative Cloud user, this premium feature is automatically included in your plan. I can’t wait to try it on my next Spark Page! (Customizing branded assets are also available for Spark Posts and Spark Videos).

For more information,  this article (How to Create Branded Stories in Adobe Spark), takes you through how these premium features work.

 

5:09 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2017/09/14

Getting Ready for Adobe MAX!

I’m going to be working on a special project the next few weeks, so I won’t be keeping up with my regular blogging schedule, but will be back in time to share new information at Adobe MAX – The Creativity Conference (October 18-20) as well as here, on-line.

Thank you for understanding. : )

5:32 AM Comments (1) Permalink
2017/09/12

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Six Easy Ways to Select Colors in Photoshop

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Six Easy Ways to Select Colors in Photoshop, you’ll discover how to select color in Photoshop using the eyedropper tool, foreground, background and heads-up-display color picker.

5:02 AM Permalink
2017/09/07

Tasmania – Island of Inspiration

I had the opportunity to visit Tasmania last month and spent the last weekend creating an Adobe Spark Page.

I really appreciate how easy it is to create a collection of photographs in Lightroom, sync it across my mobile devices, and use a beautifully designed Spark theme (template) to tell my story.

Click on the image below to view the images – I hope you enjoy the journey!

5:05 AM Permalink
2017/09/05

Setting Custom Develop Defaults in Lightroom CC

To apply Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration to all images change the default processing settings using the following steps:

1) Select a raw file and remove all settings by clicking the Reset button.

2) In the Lens Correction panel, check both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options. Changes are not limited to Lens Correction. You could, for example, change the default profile used in the Camera Calibration setting or the amount of Noise Reduction – just remember that these settings will be applied to ALL future imported images.

 

02_08_Lens Correction1

3) Choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings. Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not Undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

 

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when the are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply “Enabling” Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo. Note:  For the small number of images that I don’t want to apply these setting to, I can easily disable (uncheck) the Lens Correction options or create a preset to apply both options in one click. 

Additional Tips:

If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each model (by following the above steps for each camera model).

It is also possible to save different setting for each camera based on ISO settings and serial number (Preferences > Presets > Make defaults specific to camera serial number and/or Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting). This can be useful when using custom camera profiles and/or changing Noise Reduction options, for example.

02_08_Prefs

If you import 1000 images but will only end up using 10 of them, adding these corrections on import will increase the amount of time it takes to render previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a significant decrease in performance,  you might prefer to create a preset instead,  and apply it to only your best images.

Option (Mac) | Alt  (Win) toggles the Reset button to Set Default.

Customizing the default settings in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, defines the settings for both products.

5:22 AM Permalink
2017/08/31

Instinct and Intent – a Self Assignment

I found myself in Singapore last week with an afternoon free to make photographs. It’s a beautiful city, and I was staying near the Marina Bay – an area filled with modern architecture. Although this isn’t my typical subject matter, I decided to follow my own advice and give myself an assignment to photograph the surrounding buildings.

So, I started with the obvious – the prominent, glass high-rises. (The objective is to get out and start making images, which will, in turn, spark another idea and keep the momentum moving forward.)

Then, I started noticing interesting reflections in the surrounding buildings.

As I passed the ArtScience museum, I couldn’t help but stop to photograph some details of the building.

And the roof of the durian fruit-shaped building – The Esplanade, was quite interesting.

Then, I decided to change perspective (literally) by stepping into one of the buildings and taking the elevator to higher ground.

I found the port too interesting to pass up.

“I try not to limit myself too strictly to an assignment when I go out and photograph, because I never know what images might resonate at some point in the future. I might not understand the images that I make today, and it’s only in hindsight that I can discover their meaning and their relationship to my life at the time that I made them.”

FYI – the little white dots in the first image are cars!

On the walk back to the hotel, I decided to branch out and try to include some people in my images. I have enjoyed playing with my tilt-shift lens, and liked the way that I could include people yet hide their identity.

All in all, it was a great afternoon and the assignment enabled me to practice my passion and exercise my creativity.

Have a great weekend.  : )

5:21 AM Permalink
2017/08/29

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! 10 Tips for Working with the Layers Panel

Discover ten essential tips for working with layers in Photoshop  in this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop (10 Tips for Working with the Layers Panel ), including unlocking the Background, renaming, adding, deleting and duplicating layers, changing blend mode, opacity, visibility, color and customize Layer panel preview options.

5:45 AM Permalink
2017/08/22

15 Layer Masks Tips for Photoshop CC

1) Adding Layer Masks

  • To add a layer mask to a layer, click on the “Add Layer Mask” icon in the Layers panel or, to create a custom keyboard shortcut for adding layer masks, select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Set the “Shortcuts For” to Application Menus and toggle the disclosure triangle for the Layer menu. Scroll down to Layer Mask> and add your own shortcuts by clicking in the blank area to the right of the command. Note that there are separate options for adding layer masks while ignoring/respecting the current selection.

  • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the layer mask icon to add a layer mask to automatically hide the content of the layer (or the active selection).
  • Command + I (Mac ) | Control + I (Win) will invert a layer mask (or, click the Invert button on the Properties panel).

2) Deleting Layer Masks

  • Target the mask on the Layers panel and click the Trash icon to delete a layer mask. Or, Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) on the layer mask to choose between Delete Layer Mask or Apply Layer Mask from the context sensitive menu.
  • Or, on the Properties panel, target the Layer mask and click the Trash icon at the bottom of the panel.

3) Moving and Duplicating Layer Masks

  • Drag the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to move it from one layer to another.
  • Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to create a copy of the mask.
  • Option + Shift -drag (Mac) | Alt + Shift -drag (Win) the layer mask thumbnail to create copy of a layer mask while simultaneously inverting the mask. Note: if the mask’s Density or Feather sliders has been changed using the Properties panel, this shortcut will not work. In this situation, (Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) the layer mask thumbnail to duplicate the mask, then use the shortcut Command + I (Mac) | Control + I (Win)  to invert the mask (or click the Invert button in the Properties panel).

4) Targeting the Layer Mask

  • Command + \ (Mac) | Control + \ (Win) targets a layer mask.
  • Command + 2 (Mac) | Control + 2 (Win) targets the layer.

5) Viewing Layer Masks

  • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to target and view the mask.
  • Or, tap  “\”(backslash) to display the layer mask as an overlay (tap “\” again to hide the overlay).

6) Temporarily Disabling / Enabling Masks

  • Shift-click in the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to temporarily disable a layer mask. Click  the layer mask thumbnail again to enable it.
  • Or, Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) on a mask in the Layers panel and choose Enable/Disable Layer Mask.

7) Unlinking Masks from Layers

  • Click the link icon (between the layer icon and layer mask icons) to unlink the mask from the layer (allowing either to move independently of the other).

8) Pasting Content into a Layer Mask

  • To paste content from the clipboard into a layer mask, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the Layer mask icon on the Layers panel to make it visible. Then, select Edit > Paste.
  • Or, on the Channels panel, click on the Layer mask to target it AND click in the empty well to toggle the visibility of the layer mask (the mask will be displayed as a red overlay), and choose Edit > Paste. To hide the red overlay, click the eye icon.

  • In this Quick Tip, Julieanne reveals a simple technique to paste content directly into a layer mask in Photoshop.

9) Delicate Mask Clean-Up

  • After adding a layer mask, it can sometimes be difficult to determine if there are any small bits of the layer that have been accidentally left unselected. In this case, it might be helpful to temporarily add a layer effect such as a bright red stroke (Layer > Layer Style > Stroke, and click the color swatch to choose a vibrant color). The stroke will appear around any small areas of the mask that you may need to clean up. When finished, simply delete the layer effect.

10) Create Layer Mask from Transparency

  • In order to automatically convert the transparent areas of a layer into a mask, select Layer > Layer Mask > From Transparency.
  • To create a mask on a layer based on the transparency of another layer, in the Layers panel, select the layer that you want the mask to be added to. Then, drag the layer that you want to become the contents for the mask to the Add Mask Icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. Important: don’t click and release the mouse on the layer that you want to become the contents of the mask – clicking will select the layer, you need to drag that layer instead.

11) Non-destructive Edge Softening of Layer Masks

  • When working with layer masks, instead of trying to guess the feather value needed to soften the edges of a mask (because the feather amount will vary depending on the resolution of the image and the desired softness of the edge that is being feathered), use the non-destructive Feather slider on the Properties panel. If the image is resized or other adjustments are made at a later time, the feather can be appropriately adjusted.

12) Changing the Density of a Layer Mask Non-destructivly

  • Use the Density slider in the Properties panel to reduce the opacity (density) of the mask non-destructively.

13) Painting in a Layer Mask

  • Changing the blend mode of a painting tool can be very helpful when painting in a layer mask. For example, when drawing with the default gradient in a mask, if the mask isn’t quite right, it’s easy to draw another gradient to replace the first one. If, however, you want to draw a secondary gradient that will add to or subtract from the mask (instead of replacing it), change the blend mode for the Gradient tool to Multiply (to add black) or Screen (to add white) and then drag the second gradient.

14) Blending two Images Together using Layer Masks

15)  Swapping Heads in a Family Portrait

5:06 AM Permalink
2017/08/17

Shortcuts for Working with Layer Groups in Photoshop CC

Here are some tips and  shortcuts for working more effectively with Layer Groups:

  • To create an empty Layer Group, click the Create Layer Group (the folder) icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. The Group will be added above the currently targeted layer. If no layers are targeted, Photoshop will add the group to the top of the layer stack.
  • Command + G (Mac) | Control + G (Win) creates a new Layer Group while simultaneously placing selected layers into that group. The group will be added above the topmost currently targeted layer.
  • Command + Shift + G (Mac) | Control + Shift + G (Win) will ungroup layers.

Adding Layers to Layer Groups

  • When adding a layer to a Layer Group, Photoshop positions the layer at the top of the layer stack (with in the group).
  • Adding the shift key when releasing the mouse will position the layer at the bottom of the stack (within the group).

Repositing Layers

  • When changing the stacking order layers in the Layers panel, I found it difficult to predict if the layer I was dragging was going to land within a Layer Group or outside of it. In the example below, I want to drag the “paper” layer above the “walnuts” layer, but I didn’t want to include it within the “texture” Layer Group.

2014_10_14Layers

  • If you look carefully at the next illustration you can see that the hand icon is positioned over the bottom layer in the Layer Group. If I release the mouse at that point, the “paper” layer would be added within the “texture” Layer Group.

2014_10LayerGroup

  • Instead, if I position the curser a bit lower (below the baseline of the Layer Group), and release the mouse (as it’s positioned in the next illustration), the layer will be repositioned above the “walnuts” layer but not within the “texture” Layer Group.

  • Note: Another way to be sure that the “paper” layer wasn’t included in the texture Layer Group would have been to close the  Layer Group before repositioning the layer.

Duplicating Layer Groups

  • Command + J (Mac) | Control + J (Win) will duplicate the selected Layer Group(s).
  • Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) the Layer Group (in the Layers panel) to simultaneously duplicating and repositioning a Layer Group.
  • Control -click (Mac) | right mouse -click (Win) on the Layer Group and select Duplicate Group.

Deleting Layer Groups in Photoshop

  • With the Layer Group selected, tap the Delete key or Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the trash can icon.
  • To delete a Layer Group but keep the layers, choose Layer > Delete > Group or click the trash can icon. Either method displays a dialog with an option to delete “Group Only” (which ungroups the layers within the group and removes the Layer Group while leaving the Layers in tack).
  • Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win) a Layer Group to the trash can icon to delete a Layer Group without deleting it’s contents.

Selecting Layer Groups

  • To automatically select Layer Groups using the Move tool, enable the Auto-Select box in the Options bar and choose Group from the pull-down menu.

Nesting Layer Groups

  • You can nest layer Layer Groups up to 10 groups deep. That should help organize even the most complex documents!

Displaying the Contents of Layer Groups in Photoshop

  • Command (Mac) | Control (Win) -click the disclosure triangle next to a Layer Group to expand/collapse all Layer Groups in the document.
  • Option (Mac) | Alt (Win)  -click the disclosure triangle to expand/collapse all groups nested within the current Layer Group.
  • Option + Command (Mac) | Alt + Control (Win) -click the disclosure triangle to expand and collapse all groups (nested or not).
  • Control (Mac) | right mouse (Win) -click the Group’s disclosure triangle and choose “Close/Open this Group” or “Close/Open all Other Groups”.

And, if you’re looking for eight reasons to use Layer Groups, be sure to watch this short video that I recently posted:

5:20 AM Permalink
2017/08/15

3, 2, 1, Photoshop – Eight Reasons to use Layer Groups in Photoshop

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop, Julieanne demonstrates eight reasons to use Layer Groups in Photoshop in Photoshop CC.

The reasons are also listed below for those of you who prefer to read a list instead of watching a video!

  1. Layer Groups can help you to organize the Layers panel but putting similar layers in a group which can be collapsed/expanded as needed.
  2. Layer Groups can help when you want to effect multiple layers at once. For example, select the Layer Group and choose Free Transform to transform all of the contents of the group at once. Or, select a Layer Group and use Command + D (Mac) | Control + D (Win) to duplicate a Layer Group.
  3. Change the opacity of a Layer Group to effect the opacity of all layers within the group.
  4. Layer Effects/Layer Styles can be applied to a Layer Group. Note: when you add an Effect/Style to a group, Photoshop treats the contents of the group as if they are merged/flattened before adding the Effect/Style. As long as nothing on the layers overlaps, then the effet will be visually identicle to applying Layer Effects/Styles to individual layers (and if you only have one Layer style to update if you need to make changes). If you do have multiple layers that overlap (and don’t want the effect to appear as if the layers are merged), then you can apply the Effect/Style to one layer and copy/paste it to others.
  5. Blend modes can be applied to Layer Groups. (Similar to Layer Effects/Styles, if the contents of the layers within the Layer Group overlap, the Blend mode behaves differently than when applied to individual layers.)
  6. The effects of Blend Modes applied to individual layers within Layer Groups can be restricted to only effect those layers within the group by changing the Layer Groups Blend Mode to Normal.
  7. Layer Groups can be used as the base layer to apply Clipping Masks in order to “clip” or restrict the contents of a layer(s) to appear only where there is content within the Layer Group.
  8. Adding a layer Mask to a Layer Group enables masking of all layers within that group simultaneously.
5:09 AM Permalink
2017/08/08

3, 2, 1… Photoshop! Three Tips for Photoshop’s Crop Tool

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop, Julieanne demonstrates three tips for working with the crop tool, including quickly defining the crop area, maintaining flexibility while cropping to a specific aspect ratio, and cropping two images to the same size.

5:06 AM Permalink
2017/08/01

Window Seat features on CNN travel!

I’m super excited to announce that my aerial photography is being featured on CNN travel today: “Beauty of the Everyday – Photos of Earth from a Window Seat“.  : )

8:25 PM Permalink

Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies on Lynda.com

I’m excited to announce that my new “Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies” course is now live on Lynda.com!

 

Learn Lightroom and Photoshop workflow and image editing techniques by watching a pro. In this project-oriented course, Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost takes five images from start to finish, beginning in Lightroom and ending in Photoshop. As Julieanne walks through each workflow, she helps you understand which image editing techniques you’d apply to your photos in Lightroom, and when you’d want to switch to Photoshop to make further changes. She demonstrates how to adjust tone and enhance images in Lightroom using more traditional tools and techniques, and then proceed to Photoshop for more elaborate manipulations. Plus, she explains how to use retouching tools to remove distracting elements, and unify the color and tone of multiple images.

Topics include:

  • Selecting Lightroom or Photoshop to edit images
  • Optimizing in Lightroom, and then proceeding to Photoshop
  • Retouching to remove distracting elements
  • Using multiple photographs to quickly replace unwanted elements
  • Unifying multiple images using color and tone
5:09 AM Permalink
2017/07/26

MAKE IT – Adobe’s premiere creativity conference in Asia Pacific

I’m super excited to be speaking at MAKE IT, Adobe’s premiere creativity conference in Asia Pacific  3 August, 2017 in Sydney, Australia!

If you’re local, join over 2,000 fellow designers, artists, filmmakers and innovative thinkers will gather for an afternoon of learning and inspiration from local and international speakers. If you can’t make the event in person, you can follow all of the action from the comfort of your desk or sofa by logging into the Livestream here https://adobe.ly/2thkYS5

Check out the lineup of international industry pioneers who will be sure to challenge, educate, and inspire you including: Mike Alderson, Co-Founder & Creative Director for ManvsMachine, photographer Nicole Tung, Craft-based designer Kitiya Palaskas, designer and illustrator Timothy Goodman and James Noble, Founder, Director of Experience at Carter Digital. You an learn more about them here: https://adobe.ly/2thkYS5

Hope to see you there!

P.S. the live streaming begins at 1pm on the 3rd of August, 2017 (in Sydney) which means that the live stream begins at 8 pm on the 2nd of August here in California (PST).  If that time doesn’t work, videos of the event will be available online after the fact…

11:58 AM Permalink
2017/07/25

Photoshop Automation: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

I’m excited to announce that my new Photoshop Automation: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques course is now live on Lynda.com!If you’re like most creative pros, you probably spend a lot of time in Photoshop. And if you’re like a lot of Photoshop users, you probably spend an undue amount of time performing the same tasks. In this course, learn how to automate repetitive tasks in Photoshop, so that you can accomplish more in less time. Join Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost as she discusses a variety of productivity-boosting techniques for Photoshop automation. She shares tips for working with actions, using the Batch command, scripting, and more.

Topics include:

  • Quickly saving images as different file types
  • Creating single and multi-step actions
  • Saving and loading actions
  • Inserting stops, menu items, and conditionals
  • Tips for working with layers
  • Using the Batch command
  • Creating droplets
  • Automatically creating graphics from layers using generators
  • Working with variables and scripts
5:12 AM Permalink