by Julieanne Kost

 Comments (2)

Created

April 20, 2012

I know that this post is a bit “off-topic” for my blog, but I believe that reading can be an excellent way to spark one’s imagination. Last weekend,  I read Berhard Schlink’s novel “The Reader”. I’m sure that many of you have already read the book, but I wanted to share a few of his words that inspired vivid images in my mind.

“Her face as it was then has been overlaid in my memory by the faces she had later. If I see her in my mind’s eye as she was then, she doesn’t have a face at all, and I have to reconstruct it. High forehead, high cheekbones, play blue eyes, full lips that formed a perfect curve without any indentation, square chin, a broad-planned, strong, womanly face. I know that I found it beautiful, but I cannot recapture it’s beauty.”

“I don’t mean to say that thinking and reaching decisions have no influence on behavior. But behavior does not merely enact whatever has already been thought through and decided.”

“Sometimes the memory of happiness cannot stay true because it ended unhappily.”

“But at a certain point the memory of her stopped accompanying me wherever I went. She stayed behind, the way a city stays behind as a train pulls out of the station. It’s there, somewhere behind you, and you could go back and make sure of it, but why should you?”

“So I stopped talking about it. There’s no need to talk because the truth of what one says lies in what one does.”

I would highly recommend the book – it is not a light read, and certainly will make one think. I’m certain that one of my future composites will be influenced by Bernhard’s eloquent descriptions of his characters.

COMMENTS

  • By Modather Abo.zaid - 10:22 AM on April 20, 2012  

    it’s a really sensitive and inspiring words of his ..
    i didn’t read the book but as i can tell it worth reading ..
    and they came right on time .. :)

    thank u ..

  • By StagWeb - 4:42 AM on January 18, 2013  

    “It doesn’t matter what I feel. It doesn’t matter what I think. The dead are still dead.”

    Such a powerful novel.