Posts in Category "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

June 8, 2016

Adobe Announces Guided Upright in Adobe Camera Raw 9.6

Now you can quickly correct perspective in a photograph with precision and control using the new Transform Panel, Guided Upright tool, and Offset sliders. Watch as Julieanne demonstrates how to manually position guides to automatically correct converging vertical and horizontal lines in images, which can then be repositioned within the canvas area.

Here are some handy shortcuts to know use while using the Guided Upright tool:
Shift + T will select the Guided Upright tool
Shift + L toggles the Loupe on and off (Note: Loupe requires GPU support)
Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) with Loupe enabled to activate precision (slower) drag
Shift + G toggles the Grid overlay
“V” toggles tool overlay.
Command + Option | Control + Alt -drag to reposition the image in the preview area via the Offset X/Y sliders. Add the Shift key to constrain to horizontal/vertical directions.
Bird’s Eye View (or Navigator) – Press and hold “H”. Click in the preview area and drag the zoom rectangle over the location that you want to zoom into. Release the mouse. Release the “H”. The image zooms to the chosen area and the selected tool remains unchanged. (Note: Birds Eye View requires GPU support.)
Click here for more information via the Lightroom Journal.

8:03 AM Permalink
March 17, 2016

Full Screen Mode in Camera Raw

F toggles Normal / Full Screen modes in Camera Raw.

Note: this is the same as clicking the Full Screen Mode icon on the far right side of the tool bar, next to the Histogram.

5:09 AM Permalink
March 16, 2016

Viewing Tool Overlays in Camera Raw

V toggles the visibility of the Adjustment Brush pins and/or the tool overlay for Graduated and Radial Filter, Spot Removal, and Red Eye Removal tools.

5:08 AM Permalink
February 12, 2016

Customizing the Default Setting for ACR and Lightroom

I have customized my default processing settings for Lightroom in order to apply both Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration on import. To do this, I selected a raw image, moved to the Develop module, and clicked the Reset button to remove any previous edits made to the file. Then, I checked both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

02_08_Lens Correction1

To save the settings, choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when they are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply enabling Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo.

If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each one (by taking a raw file from each camera model into the Develop module and changing and saving the settings). You can even save out different settings for each camera based on ISO settings and serial number using Preferences > Presets > Make defaults specific to camera serial number and/or Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting.  This can be very useful when using custom camera profiles and/or changing Noise Reduction options for example.

02_08_Prefs

Personally, I like automating the application of Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration to my images. However, there are some drawbacks. First, because I have told Lightroom to render Lens Corrections on every image I import, if I import 1,000 images but end up using only 100 of them,  adding the Lens Correction to all of the “unused” files may add additional rendering time for previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a slowdown in your workflow, you may prefer to create a Lens Correction preset and apply it just to your best images. In addition, if you have lenses that you don’t want corrected, you would have to remove the settings. It’s really up to you and how you prefer to work.

Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) changes the Reset button to Set Default and displays the Set Default Settings dialog.

Finally, you should know that when you choose to customize the default settings  in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, those settings are saved for both products.

5:34 AM Permalink
February 2, 2016

Calling all Students: Passport to Creativity!

The Adobe Student Marketing team is very excited to launch Passport to Creativity! Passion Passport will give six students from around the world the chance to travel to the world’s most protected natural environments, capture them, and showcase their work. Students can simply tag their Instagram photos, videos or Behance portfolios with #MadeThis and #PassportToCreativity.

Q: Who is eligible to participate?
A: Students who are currently enrolled in a college or university, from all majors and backgrounds, are eligible. You must be 18 years of age, or older.

Q: I don’t live in the US. Can I participate?
A: Yes. The opportunity is available globally.

Q: Will I be paid for my work?
A: No. However Adobe will be providing room and board, food and travel.

Q: Can I tag multiple posts?
A: Yes, you can tag as much of your work as you’d like with #MadeThis #PassportToCreativity.

Q: Do I need Creative Cloud to participate?
A: Not at all, but it can’t hurt your chances to be familiar with it. We encourage everyone to apply if they have a passion for creativity and exploration. Get started by downloading a free trial of Creative Cloud here: http://adobe.ly/1NctzEp

Click here for more information and application deadlines.

5:15 AM Permalink
December 14, 2015

Birds Eye View for Fast Navigation in Adobe Camera Raw

This is a fast way to navigate across the image, especially when zoomed in. It is similar to the existing feature in the Photoshop app itself. Here’s how to use it:

• Press and hold H.

• Click and drag to set the position of the zoom rectangle as desired.  The zoom rectangle is shown as an outline around the cursor.

• Release the mouse. The image zooms to the area chosen in the previous step. The selected tool remains unchanged.

• If you start in Fit View mode or smaller, the zoom rectangle will represent 100% pixel view (1:1). This is a quick way to zoom to 1:1 at a specific part of the image (such as a person’s face, or other area of interest).

• If you start zoomed in, then after you release the mouse you’ll return to the same zoom level. For example, if you start at 200%, then after releasing the mouse you’ll be back at 200%.

Note: Birds Eye View is only available when GPU is enabled.

(Thank you Sharad for that tip!)

5:22 AM Permalink
September 29, 2015

Merging multiple images to create a panorama in Adobe Camera Raw

When the view won’t fit in a single exposure, discover how to Merge multiple images to create a panorama in Adobe Camera Raw in my free video from Lynda.com.09_25pano

 

5:23 AM Permalink
September 25, 2015

Customizing Color Using HSL in Adobe Camera Raw

Discover how to make subtle yet impactful adjustments to color in my free video (Customizing color using HSL in Adobe Camera Raw) from Lynda.com.09_25Blue Truck01

 

5:01 AM Permalink
September 23, 2015

Make Your Image Shine in Adobe Camera Raw 

Discover how to use Adobe Camera Raw to improve your image in this free tutorial (Bringing it all together to make an image shine  in Adobe Camera Raw), from Lynda.com.

09_25AllTogether

5:34 AM Permalink
September 22, 2015

Resetting the Local Adjustment tools in Adobe Camera Raw

Command + Option + R on Mac (Control + Alt + R on Win) will reset the sliders for the Local Adjustment Tools in Adobe Camera Raw. This shortcut will work regardless of whether you have a local correction selected or not.  (If you don’t have one selected, it’ll simply reset the sliders to zero for the “next” correction that you create.  Note that in ACR, attempting to create an “empty” correction will result in a warning dialog.)

You can also reset the sliders by right-clicking the pin in the preview area and choosing “Reset Local Correction Settings” from the popup menu, or choose the same entry from the flyout menu in the local correction pane.

5:31 AM Permalink
September 18, 2015

Correcting a Tilted Horizon in Adobe Camera Raw

Discover how easy it is to straighten a crooked horizon in my free video (Correcting a tilted horizon in Adobe Camera Raw), from Lynda.com.

09_21Straighten

5:56 AM Permalink
June 16, 2015

Dehaze in Camera Raw 9.1 for Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC

The new Dehaze control in Lightroom CC and Adobe Camera Raw 9.1 can help you to dramatically improve an image by removing haze. The Dehaze technology is based on a physical model of how light is transmitted, and it tries to estimate light that is lost due to absorption and scattering through the atmosphere. For the best results, you’ll want to set the white balance for the image before using Dehaze. Then, in the Effects panel, move the slider to the right – to easily remove the haze from the original scene. Move the slider to the left to add a creative haze effect.You can choose to make very subtle to very significant adjustments – if you’re pushing the slider to the extreme, you might want to refine the image using the Basic panel (increasing the shadow detail or refining the Vibrance slider) in order to achieve the exact look that you’re after. Check out the video below to see Dehaze in action.

Original image and with the addition of the Dehaze feature (slider set to +68).

Original image and with the addition of the Dehaze feature (slider set to +68).

Original image and with the subtraction of the Dehaze feature (slider set to -72)

Original image and with the subtraction of the Dehaze feature (slider set to -72)

When moving the slider, there is very little change in the highlight area (on the right side of the Histogram), while the shadows and lower portion of the histogram is clearly being changed. If you are concerned that the darker values in the image are being clipped to pure black, Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) -drag the slider to see the black point clipping visualization. When you see black areas appear in the image, you know that you’re starting to clip to pure black and can back off. In addition, Dehaze can be added locally by applying ACR as a Smart Filter in Photoshop.
Click here for more information about Camera Raw 9.1 including new camera and profile support.

2:00 AM Permalink
June 15, 2015

Photoshop CC 2015 FAQ

Please read this important information about installing Photoshop CC 2015. By default Photoshop CC 2015 will:

  • Uninstall prior versions of Photoshop CC you have installed
  • Migrate your presets, preferences and any compatible Add-Ons
  • Not migrate 3rd party plug-ins

For more information, please click here.

11:05 PM Permalink
April 24, 2015

Tips for Creating Panoramas in Adobe Camera Raw

Click here to watch how to create raw Panoramas images in Camera Raw 9.0.

Below are additional tips for creating raw Panoramas image in Camera Raw 9.0.

• If you have made adjustments to the individual images prior to choosing Photo Merge > Panorama, not all of them carry over to the merged file. For example, if you have made local adjustments – such as applying the radial or a graduated filter, or painting in selective areas with the adjustment brush on individual exposures, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file! Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting Panorama image.

• The settings that are NOT copied over from individual exposures to the merged panorama are:

– Lens Corrections/Upright (with the exception of Defringe settings), since the merge tool is changing geometric attributes, and does not copy over existing geometric settings.

– Local Corrections

– Red Eye

– Spot Healing

– Upright

– Crop

• If you make adjustments to an individual exposures that can be copied over to the merged file (such as conversion to B/W or Split Toning adjustments) , make sure that the exposure with the adjustments is the “most selected” image.

Command + Shift + M (Mac) | Control + Shift + m (Win) will run Photo Merge > Panorama based on the last used settings (without displaying the Merge preview window).

• By default Camera Raw appends the file name with -Pano. You can change this in the Camera Raw Preferences.

• Post-merge, lens profiles don’t make any sense to apply to panoramas, so the feature is disabled.

Tap “1” to select Spherical

Tap “2” to select Perspective

Tap “3” to select Cylindrical

• There is a size limit of 65,000 pixels on the long side of a file or, 512 MP – whichever comes first.

5:07 AM Permalink
April 23, 2015

Tips for Creating Raw HDR Images in Camera Raw 9.0

Click here to watch how to create raw HDR images in Camera Raw 9.0

Below are additional tips for creating raw HDR images in Camera Raw 9.0. Not all adjustments that you make to individual images will carry over when selecting  Photo Merge > HDR in Camera Raw. For example, if you have made local adjustments on individual exposures using the radial filter or the adjustment brush, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file. Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting, merged, HDR image. The settings that are NOT copied over from individual exposures to the merged file are:

– The primary tone settings in the Basic panel including Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks (since the merge is expanding tonal range using its own calculations).

– Tone Curve

– Local Corrections

– Red Eye

– Spot Healing

– Upright

– Crop

– Process Version (if set to anything other than the most recent – 2012)

• If you make adjustments to an individual exposures that can be copied over to the merged file (such as conversion to B/W or Split Toning adjustments) , make sure that the exposure with the adjustments is the “most selected” image.

• HDR merging requires exposure metadata. If aperture and ISO information is available, then it is used as well.

• Camera Raw will  show an error if you try to merge photos of different sizes, focal lengths, etc.

• The merged HDR images is 16 bit due to the significant (and painful) file size that would result if the HDR merge was 32-bit.

• By default Camera Raw appends the file name with -HDR. You can change this in the Camera Raw Preferences.

• The resulting (merged) DNG files will always default to Process Version (PV) 2012, despite any differing PV settings applied to the source images. This is because PV2012 is required for the extended Exposure range (+/- 10 stops) of 16 & 32bit files, where as PV2003 & PV2010 are restricted to (+/- 4 stops).

– Tap the “A” key to toggle the Align Images feature

– Tap the “T” key to toggle Auto Tone

– Tap the “Y” key  to show the Deghost Shadow Overlay

5:12 AM Permalink