Posts in Category "Adobe Lightroom"

September 5, 2017

Setting Custom Develop Defaults in Lightroom CC

To apply Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration to all images change the default processing settings using the following steps:

1) Select a raw file and remove all settings by clicking the Reset button.

2) In the Lens Correction panel, check both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options. Changes are not limited to Lens Correction. You could, for example, change the default profile used in the Camera Calibration setting or the amount of Noise Reduction – just remember that these settings will be applied to ALL future imported images.

 

02_08_Lens Correction1

3) Choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings. Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not Undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

 

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when the are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply “Enabling” Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo. Note:  For the small number of images that I don’t want to apply these setting to, I can easily disable (uncheck) the Lens Correction options or create a preset to apply both options in one click. 

Additional Tips:

If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each model (by following the above steps for each camera model).

It is also possible to save different setting for each camera based on ISO settings and serial number (Preferences > Presets > Make defaults specific to camera serial number and/or Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting). This can be useful when using custom camera profiles and/or changing Noise Reduction options, for example.

02_08_Prefs

If you import 1000 images but will only end up using 10 of them, adding these corrections on import will increase the amount of time it takes to render previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a significant decrease in performance,  you might prefer to create a preset instead,  and apply it to only your best images.

Option (Mac) | Alt  (Win) toggles the Reset button to Set Default.

Customizing the default settings in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, defines the settings for both products.

5:22 AM Permalink
August 1, 2017

Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies on Lynda.com

I’m excited to announce that my new “Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies” course is now live on Lynda.com!

 

Learn Lightroom and Photoshop workflow and image editing techniques by watching a pro. In this project-oriented course, Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost takes five images from start to finish, beginning in Lightroom and ending in Photoshop. As Julieanne walks through each workflow, she helps you understand which image editing techniques you’d apply to your photos in Lightroom, and when you’d want to switch to Photoshop to make further changes. She demonstrates how to adjust tone and enhance images in Lightroom using more traditional tools and techniques, and then proceed to Photoshop for more elaborate manipulations. Plus, she explains how to use retouching tools to remove distracting elements, and unify the color and tone of multiple images.

Topics include:

  • Selecting Lightroom or Photoshop to edit images
  • Optimizing in Lightroom, and then proceeding to Photoshop
  • Retouching to remove distracting elements
  • Using multiple photographs to quickly replace unwanted elements
  • Unifying multiple images using color and tone
5:09 AM Permalink
July 20, 2017

Lightroom Web Getting Started Series

Did you know that if you subscribe to the Creative Cloud for Photography program or Creative Cloud, you can access the photographs that you synchronize form Lightroom CC on the desktop or Lightroom mobile from any device from within a browser? This means that you’re no longer tied to a specific device – log on to lightroom.adobe.com and sign in using your adobe ID to upload, view, edit, and share your images from anywhere.

For example, if you’re with friends or family – or even with a client, and want to show them your photographs on their computer screen (because it’s much larger than  your mobile device), you can now use Lightroom web.  And, if you make any changes to those photos, all of the changes will be synchronized to Lightroom on your desktop and across your mobile devices. In addition, you can use Lightroom web to quickly share collections of images and Lightroom web galleries.

Following is a “Getting Started” series for Lightroom web that walks you through the workflow:

In this video we’ll discover how to use Lightroom web to access, edit, and share synced photos using a browser.
In this video we’ll cover the Dashboard, All Photos view, image navigation, rating and flagging images  in Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll learn how to organize our photographs using collections in Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll discover how to add (upload) photographs to Lightroom web on any device and see how they’re synchronized with Lightroom CC on the desktop.
In this video we’ll quickly crop and straighten a photograph using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll learn how to set White Balance and make tonal and color changes to photographs using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll convert an image to Black and White and add color toning effects using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll add special effects including Dehaze, Post-Crop vignettes, and Grain to photographs using Lightroom web.
In this video, we’ll share collections of photographs and then view comments made by family and clients in Lightroom CC.
In this video, we’ll create a Lightroom Web Gallery and combine photos and text in a customizable layout.
In this video, we’ll look at how Lightroom web’s Search (technology preview) can help us to quickly find out photographs.
5:03 AM Permalink
July 18, 2017

Lightroom Mobile Updates for iOS and Android

I’m excited to announce updates to Lightroom Mobile: iOS has a new selective Brush, the Linear and Radial adjustment tools have an eraser, and a new Details tab enables global sharpening and noise reduction. Android has a new interface which is much more Android-ish.

First, the new selective Brush for iOS: now you can paint anywhere in your photograph and then dial in the enhancements that you want to apply. On the more recent phones that support 3D touch, your “brush” strokes are pressure sensitive allowing you to control the intensity of the effect.

First, tap the Selective edit stack in the lower left, then, tap the plus icon in the upper left.

 

Tap to select the Brush. To change brush parameters, tap-drag up/down on the icons (on the left) to change brush size, feather, and flow (flow is similar to opacity in Photoshop).

 

Painting in the image displays red overlay as a visual indicator of the area that will be modified. To remove any unwanted areas, tap the eraser and paint. Note: use two fingers to zoom and pan when using the selective adjustment tools.

Once you’re finished painting the area to be modified, tap one of the edit stacks to make changes (the red overlay is automatically hidden order to see the changes). Note: you can continue to paint and erase in the image after making the adjustments. 

In this example, both the exposure (Light edit stack) and white balance (Color edit stack) were modified. Tap the check in the lower right to apply the edits. Note: when working with the selective adjustments, tap the three dots in the upper right to access masking overlay options, duplicate, or remove a selective adjustment.

In addition, the Linear and Radial adjustment tools now have an Eraser tool to remove adjustments from unwanted areas.

After creating a Radial or Linear adjustment, tap the Eraser icon and paint in the image area to hide adjustments in unwanted areas.  

There’s a new details Details edit stack to apply global Sharpening and Noise Reduction to an image.

Use the Details tab to apply global Sharpening and Noise Reduction.

The interface for Lightroom mobile on the  iPad Pro has been redesigned specifically for the larger screen and the Apple Pencil is pressure sensitive when using the selective Brush tool.

For Android customers, the team has been hard at work making a completely new version which is much more Android-ish! Be sure to download the update to experience the new look and feel.

If you’re looking for additional training on Lightroom Mobile, I posted a Getting Started Series on youtube. Below is the first video in the series, all of my other videos can be found here: Lightroom mobile video tutorials.

 

8:25 AM Permalink
June 19, 2017

Adobe Launches Lightroom Instagram Channel

Hey, hey! The Lightroom team just launched their own Instagram channel and I’m thrilled they included three of my images as part of their #BeBoundless series!

Photo by @jkost || During my first time in Antarctica, we were silently gliding past a larger iceberg. I noticed that there was a hole that I could see through so I focused on that spot and waited to see if we passed by anything interesting. It just so happened that there was a larger iceberg on the other side, and I was fortunate enough to capture an image as it appeared in the “window”. #BeBoundless

 

Photo by @jkost || This entire effect was captured in-camera. I love the idea of using the camera to capture things you can’t see with the naked eye – like black and white, or motion blur as seen here. Photography can be a way to explore new senses and see the world in a different way. #BeBoundless

 

Photo by @jkost || This was my first time using a small airplane for photography… and I’m afraid of flying. There were no doors on the plane and I was strapped in with one of those harnesses you can get at Home Depot. Fear aside, it was an incredible way to change my perspective. #BeBoundless

10:00 AM Permalink
June 8, 2017

Joshua Tree – An Afternoon in Solitude

I have finally embraced the fact that I’m an introvert. Not only do I like spending time alone, I need to spend time alone. If you surround me with people day after day, eventually, I will run out of “nice”.

I enjoy nature. And silence. Put the two together and that’s when I do my best creative work. So, when I had the opportunity to spend an afternoon driving through a national park by myself, I packed my camera gear, jumped in the car, and off I went.

I used Adobe Spark Page to assemble my favorite images from the afternoon and limited my editing to the “more traditional” photographic editing/toning workflow in Lightroom. (I find that setting limitations (as well as deadlines) enables me to actually publish the work in a timely manner!)

“I believe loneliness is a door you have to go through—a passage leading you to solitude. Solitude is what I’m after. The kind of tranquility that allows you access to your own imagination. Solitude helps you differentiate, define the borders of the self. Solitude helps you figure out where everybody else stops and you begin. Solitude is quite different from being alone. Solitude is the state of being alone without losing your mind.” ­­—Jeanne Marie Laskas

 

Below are some images from the project. The original, raw captures are on the left and the toned images are on the right. I used the Basic panel to set white balance, black and white points, increase shadows, decrease highlights, and increase Clarity. I used the Targeted Adjustment tool (in the HSL panel) to desaturate and darken the luminance of the sky.

In the next set of images, I used the Adjustment Brush to selectively dodge and burn the tips of the cacti and the pink flowers, and the Radial Filter to lighten the edges in the image of the cacti and darken the edges of the flower image.

For this last group of images (top images are original captures, bottom images are edited), working in Reference View (in the Develop module) made it much easier to compare images while adjusting HSL to unify the sky across the images. I really appreciate that I can create a collection in Lightroom CC, sync it to the cloud, and then access those files to quickly assemble my Spark Page.  Click here for a video that demonstrates how to create your own Adobe Spark Page.

5:20 AM Permalink
April 25, 2017

Creating Diptychs in Lightroom CC

Because of the aspect ratio of most displays, when creating a slideshow of my photography, I typically show a single image when it’s orientation is landscape, and two images when the orientation is vertical. Although it may be more work to find images that work well together, displaying two vertical images better fills the space, provides the opportunity  to show more images, and helps change the rhythm of the images in the presentation.

To create the diptychs, sort the images into pairs (I prefer using collections to do this). Then, in the Print module, create a template at the correct size using the Print Job panel (19.20 x 10.80 at 100 ppi for HD videos for example).

Select the images, and choose Print To File. Import the new diptychs into Lightroom, reorder as needed, move to the Slideshow module, and you’re on your way to a more interesting presentation of your work!

5:10 AM Permalink
April 3, 2017

Updated- Lightroom CC Tips,Tricks, and Quick Reference Guide!

Although I really appreciate that you can search my blog for Lightroom tips and shortcuts, several customers have requested that I create a single, condensed document that contains the Lightroom CC shortcuts that I use most often. So, click here to view/download the document.

The PDF file is 20+ pages long, and still doesn’t contain every shortcut… If you run across any mistakes/typos, please let me know and I’ll update the document.

And, if you’re looking for more information about my Lightroom workflow, be sure to check out my book Passenger Seat: Creating a Photographic Project from Conception through Execution in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom”.

Have a great week!

5:01 AM Permalink
March 27, 2017

Setting a Default Folder for Lightroom Mobile

When capturing images in Lightroom mobile (or when importing them into Lightroom mobile from your camera roll), Lightorom uploads those photographs to the cloud and then downloads them to Lightroom CC on the desktop. By default, the images appear in the Folders panel under a new drive header with the same name as your mobile device. While it’s easy to select and drag the files  to another folder, it might be easier to import them directly into your desired folder. To do this, you need to change the default location for your mobile files. Under Preferences > Lightroom mobile, enable Specify location for Lightroom mobile images, click Choose, and navigate to the desired folder. 

Note: you can also have Lightroom automatically create folders based on capture date.

5:31 AM Permalink
March 24, 2017

Quickly Apply a Preset using the Painter Tool in Lightroom CC

A very powerful, but seldom used feature of the painter tool is it’s ability to “spray-on” presets in the Library module. Select the Painter tool, set the Paint option to the desired preset, and click on an image to apply it. Note: you can also click -drag across multiple images to add a preset.

5:04 AM Permalink
March 23, 2017

Sync and Reposition Local Adjustments Between Images in Lightroom CC

Lightroom’s ability to sync local adjustments between images can help increase your productivity when workignwith several, similar images. This video (Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC), will show you how.  (The link above should take you directly to the portion of the demo that covers syncing local adjustments from 6:15 – 7:20).

Note: if it’s easier, you can use the Copy… button (located at the bottom of the left panels in the Develop module) to copy Local Adjustments. Then select a different image, and paste those adjustments. It just depends on your workflow.

4:52 AM Permalink
March 22, 2017

Assigning Keywords using the Painter Tool in Lightroom CC

In this video (Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC), you’ll discover how to access Recently Used Keywords as well as Saved Keyword Sets using the Painter tool in Lightroom CC. Note, the link above should take you directly to the keywording portion of the demo (1:50 – 2:55).

4:50 AM Permalink
March 20, 2017

Using the Painter tool to Add Images to a Collection in Lightroom

To use the Painter tool to add images to a collection in Lightroom, in the Library module, right-click on a regular collection (not a smart collection) and choose Set as Target Collection. Then, select the painter tool and choose Target Collection from the list of Paint options. While the painter tool is selected, clicking on an image in the grid to add it to the collection. You can also click – drag across multiple images to add them to the target collection.

The video below demonstrates how to set a target collection when creating collection, tapping the “B” key to add an image to the targeted collection as well as using the Painter tool to add images to a collection (2:15):

5:10 AM Permalink
March 8, 2017

Filtering Collections in Lightroom CC

To quickly find a collection in Lightroom CC, type the name of the collection in the search field.

Filtering collections a huge time-saver as I have (literally)  hundreds of collections of images in my Lightroom catalog).

5:14 AM Permalink
March 6, 2017

Adobe Announces Lightroom Mobile for iOS 2.7 and Android 2.3

I’m excited to announce that Lightroom mobile now includes the ability to capture raw, high dynamic range (HDR) images! In the Lightroom mobile app, tap the camera icon and then choose HDR from the drop down at the bottom of the screen.

Lightroom mobile automatically analyzes the scene to determine the appropriate spread of exposure values over three shots (most other apps only average two exposures). Then, Lightroom automatically aligns, de-ghosts, and tone maps the image, creating a 16-bit floating point DNG file which can then be edited as desired. The resulting DNG file offers a much larger dynamic range than a singe raw file while maintaining all other advantages of a raw file such as higher bit-depth per color, lack of JPEG compression, and the ability to address white balance after capture with no loss of information! Although, HDR files are larger, I believe the superior image quality and greater editing flexibility are well worth the increase in file size.  Plus, while in HDR capture mode, you also have access to exposure compensation, white balance, and the manual focus slider.

Note: for iOS users, the HDR mode requires a device that can capture in DNG such as an iPhone 6, 6s Plus, 7, 7 Plus, iPhone SE, or iPad Pro 9.7″. For Android users, the Samsung S7, S7 Edge, Google Pixel, and Pixel XL are supported. 

In addition, Speed Review is back! In Review mode, tap -drag up/down on the left side of the screen to add star ratings. Tap -drag up/down on the right side of the screen to add pick/reject flags.

Export Original enables you to export DNG files captured in Lightroom mobile (as well as raw files imported from your camera to Lightroom mobile or Lightroom web) to the camera roll. Tap the Share icon and choose Export Original.

Note: if you’re images originated in, and were synchronized from Lightroom CC on the desktop, you can not export the original raw file from Lightroom mobile because Lightroom CC on the desktop does not upload the full resolution raw file to the cloud (instead it uses a Smart Preview).

And, for Android Creative Cloud members, both the Radial and Linear selective adjustments are now available!

In addition, the team has improved sync speed and stability and added background sync and upload features.

For more information about Lightroom mobile  click here to see how  to use the Force Touch and Notification Center widget on iOS or, click here to see my Lightroom mobile Getting Started Series.

8:05 AM Permalink