Posts in Category "Adobe Photoshop"

February 15, 2018

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Radial Paint Symmetry in Photoshop CC

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, photoshop, Julieanne demonstrates how to unlock the Radial Paint Symmetry’s hidden features in Photoshop CC.

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January 30, 2018

Radial Symmetry in Photoshop CC

Did you know that you can unlock additional features of Photoshop’s Paint Symmetry technology preview to quickly create illustrations with variable radial symmetry (and mirrored radial symmetry) simply by renaming any Symmetry Path in the Path panel? Here’s how:

  1. Choose Preferences > Technology and check Enable Paint Symmetry.

  1. Select the Paint Brush, Pencil, or Eraser tool. Note: Paint Symmetry doesn’t support Live Brush Tips (airbrush, bristle tips, erodible).
  2. Click the butterfly icon in the Options bar and select any type of symmetry from the menu. I find that selecting New Dual Axis enables me to use the horizontal and vertical lines as guides however it doesn’t really matter which option you choose because the next step actually determines the type of symmetry (radial or mandala (mirrored)) as well as the number of axis.

  1. Tap Enter (Mac) | Return (win) to accept the default Path Symmetry transformation.
  2. In the Paths panel, rename the path one of the following:

Radial Symmetry x (where x is the number of segments desired with 12 segments being the maximum).

Mandala Symmetry x (where x is the number of segments desired with 10 segments being the maximum).

The examples below show Radial Symmetry set to 10 (resulting in a single paint stroke being repeated 10 times around a 360° axis).

The examples below show Mandala Symmetry set to 10 (resulting in a single paint stroke first being mirrored, then repeated 10 times around a 360° axis).

For a closer look at the difference between  the Radial and Mandala Symmetry options, the illustration below shows the results of a single brush stroke with Radial Symmetry set to 8.The next illustration is the result of adding a second brush stroke.

The next illustration shows Mandala Symmetry set to 8 with a single brush stroke. The Mandala symmetry first mirrors the brush stroke, then repeats it around the radial axis.

Next is the result of adding a second brush stroke.

Here are some additional examples of Radial Symmetry (10, 8, and 10). In the first example,  I clicked once with a pressure sensitive brush, then shift-clicked to draw straight lines between the points. In the second drawing, I started in the center, drew a “swoosh” (crossing over the axis creates the center swirl) and ended the stroke in the center. In the third example, I held the shift key to draw straight lines along the horizontal and vertical axis.

Here are some additional examples of Mandala Symmetry (set to 6, 10, and 8).

Of course this is just the tip of the iceberg – you can always change colors, brush attributes, reposition or rotate the symmetry path, use blend modes to combine multiple drawings, add color overlays – the list goes on and on! Enjoy.

Mike Shaw created this time-lapse video to show you his unique technique for sketching and then creating a mandala. Below are two beautiful examples of Paint Symmetry in Photoshop from Mike. In the first example Mike created custom symmetry path(s), the second uses the paint symmetry feature set to mandala mentioned above.



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January 23, 2018

Adobe Adds New Features to Photoshop CC (19.1)

Adobe announced the following new features to Photoshop CC 19.1 including:

  • Support for Microsoft high-density monitors and improved Dial support
  • Better SVG compatibility with Adobe XD
  • Select Subject
  • Select and Mask improvements

Windows High Density Monitor Support

With this release, Photoshop on Windows 10 Creator’s Edition now offers a full range of choices for UI scale factors from 100% through 400%, in 25% increments. This means that the Photoshop interface will look crisp, beautiful, and the right size no matter the density of your monitor. This is one of the top most requested features from Photoshop customers on Windows devices and will allow us to take advantage of every pixel on high-density screens. For more information on high-density pixels on HiDPI displays, please see Jeff Trannberry’s blog.

Improved Microsoft Dial support

For customers using the Microsoft Dial, you can now use the Brush Setting panel to dynamically change settings as you paint. Controlled settings include size, roundness, angle, scatter, texture depth, foreground and background color, opacity, flow, wetness, and mix (previously, settings could only be changed between paint strokes).

Better SVG compatibility with Adobe XD

Copy and Pasting text as SVG now supports multiple text styles and effects from Photoshop to Adobe XD.

Select Subject

Photoshop is using Adobe Sensei to help make selections of prominent subjects faster than ever before.  With an image open, select the Quick Selection or Magic Wand tool and, in the Options bar, click the Select Subject button (or choose Select > Subject).

This new feature can help create an initial selection of a person or object  in an image. In the example below,  Select Subject selected almost all of the kitsune statue with a single click of the Select Subject button (even as the subject consisted of multiple tones and colors).

It was easy to then refine the selection (to include the missing areas) using the Lasso tool.

On more difficult selections, try using Select Subject to help with the initial selection, then use additional tools or the Select & Mask workspace to refine it. Note: Select Subject is also available in the Select & Mask workspace while using the Quick Selection tool.

Select and Mask Improvements

A slider has been added to the Decontaminate Colors option in the Select and Mask workspace allowing additional control over the removal of  unwanted colors along the edges of selections.  Note: this feature is also available in Refine Edge.

 

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January 16, 2018

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Four Ways to Select Layers in Photoshop CC

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop, you’ll discover four ways to quickly select layers in Photoshop CC.

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January 9, 2018

3, 2, 1 Photoshop! Ten Custom Keyboard Shortcuts You Might Not Be Aware Of

Discover how these 10 custom keyboard shortcuts can help increase your productivity in Photoshop CC.

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December 27, 2017

15 Tips for Working with Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

I recently posted the oh-so-short 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to Use Smart Objects in Photoshop video (below), but I use Smart Objects so heavily in my workflow that I thought I would gather all of my posts on Smart Objects to make them easier to find. If you’ve never used Smart Objects, they offer a non-destructive, flexible way to work with layers in Photoshop (especially when resizing, transforming, compositing, filtering, working with templates and more). Here is the short overview video and below that is more in-depth information about Smart Objects.


1) The Power of Smart Objects

This next video is quite old, but I’m including it here because it walks through a number of scenarios in which you might want to use Smart Objects. It’s a looooong video, but fortunately you can view it 2x on YouTube.  : )

2) Opening/Placing Files as Smart Objects

There are several ways to add an image as a Smart Object in Photoshop:

  • From Lightroom Classic select Photos > Edit In > Open as Smart Object in Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • From Bridge use File > Place > In Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • From Photoshop use File > Place Embedded or File > Place Linked.
  • Drag-and-drop a document from Bridge or Lightroom on to an open document in Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) drag-and-drop a document from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop and create a linked Smart Object.
  • Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) drag-and-drop a document from  Lightroom on Mac to an open document in Photoshop and create a linked Smart Object.
  • Open an image in Camera Raw. Then, hold the shift key to toggle the Open Image button to Open Object and click to open the image as an embedded Smart Object into Photoshop. Note: to set Camera Raw to open as Smart objects by default, click the link at the bottom of the Camera Raw dialog to display the Workflow Options. Under Photoshop, enable the Open in Photoshop as Smart Objects option. Close the dialog. In Bridge, you can then choose to bypass the Camera Raw dialog, by Shift -double clicking the file in Bridge to open it directly into Photoshop as a Smart Object.

Navigate to Photoshop’s Preferences >  General for additional control when placing files as Smart Objects:

  • Always Create Smart Objects when Placing —converts the file to be placed into a Smart Object. If you have reason to place an image as a regular, pixel based layer, uncheck this option.
  • Resize Image During Place —automatically resizes files to fit in the open document and displays the free transformation handles. Because Photoshop converts the placed file into a Smart Object before resizing, the original data is there if you need to transform it larger.
  • Skip Transform when Placing —automatically resizes files to  fit in the open document and automatically confirms (applies) the transformation

Note: To help with the placement/alignment/scale of an object that is being placed the placed layer’s Opacity, Fill, and Blend Mode can be modified using the Layers panel before committing to the transformation.

3) Convert the Background to a Smart Object

Control -click (Mac) | Right -click (Win) the Background layer (in the Layers panel) to convert the Background to a Smart Object in a single click.

4) Editing the Contents of a Smart Object

Double click the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layer’s panel to Edit the Contents of a Smart Object or, use the shortcut Command + Option + Shift + E (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + E (Win).

5) Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object

Discover how replace the contents of a Smart Object in this free video (Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object)  from Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

6) The Difference Between Duplicating a Smart Object and Creating New Smart Object via Copy

If you select a Smart Object in the Layers panel and duplicate it using one of the three methods below, editing the contents of ANY of the instances of the Smart Object will update ALL instances of that Smart Object.

  1. Layer > Duplicate Layer
  2. Layer > New > Layer Via Copy  or Command + J (Mac) | Control + J (Win)
  3. Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) the Smart Object in the Layers panel

On the other hand, if you select a Smart Object in the Layers panel and choose Layer > Smart Objects > New Smart Object via Copy, a new copy of the smart object is created. Editing the contents of the new copy will only edit that Smart Object.

This video demonstrates the difference between duplicating a Smart Object and creating a new Smart Object via Copy

7) Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll learn how to embed and link Smart Objects, update modified content using the Properties and Layers panel, resolve missing files, and filter layers based on Smart Object attributes.

Note: at 7:21 I say that you can’t change an embedded Smart Object to a linked Smart Object (because this video was recorded before the 2014 release of Photoshop). In more recent versions, right -click on the Smart Object layer and use the context sensitive menus to convert from Linked to Embedded (or vice versa).

 

8) Converting Embedded Smart Objects and Packaging Linked Files in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll discover how to convert an Embedded Smart Object to a Linked Smart Object as well as package Linked files when collaborating with others.

9) Updating “Modified” Linked Smart Objects

In the illustration below, I have placed an illustration created in Adobe Illustrator into my Photoshop document (this also works with other file types including PSD, TIF, raw, etc.). Let’s imagine that the illustration is still being refined by another artist on the team.

2014_12UpdateLSO01

If the linked document (the illustration) is updated, Photoshop will display a warning icon in both the Layers and Properties panel the next time you open the file. Note: Photoshop doesn’t automatically update the master document with the updated linked file as you may not want the updated version.

2014_12UpdateLSO02

To update the link, click the warning icon in the Properties panel and choose Update Modified Content.

2014_12UpdateLSO03

The Smart Object (in the master document) will be updated with the new artwork.

2014_12UpdateLSO04

10) What Happens if a Linked Smart Object is Missing?

If you loose the link to a Smart Object (perhaps you’ve moved the image on disk or the linked smart object is off-line), Photoshop will display a dialog when the file is opened that will enable you to relink the asset. Click Relink to locate and relink the asset, or click OK if you don’t have access to the asset or want to relink it at another time using the Properties panel (or, by right-clicking on the linked asset’s thumbnail in the Layers panel).

If the option to “Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility” (in the File Handling Preferences) was enabled when the file was saved, Photoshop can still print a document with a missing linked Smart Object (at the same size as it was saved or smaller) because Photoshop will have included a flattened version of the entire document within the PSD or TIFF file. Note: you can not modify the contents of a missing linked Smart Object.

11) Using Linked Creative Cloud Smart Objects

This video demonstrates how to add a graphic to the Libraries panel and how to make change to the Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object.  If you’re already familiar with saving different types of assets to the Libraries panel, jump to 2:34 (and stop at 5:11 when I switch to talking about brushes).

12) Copying and Pasting Illustrator Artwork s as a Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object

When copying and pasting artwork from Illustrator to Photoshop, you can choose to Paste the artwork as a Smart Object and “Add to your current library” which automatically converts the artwork to a Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object.

13) How to Extract a Raw File with Settings from a Smart Object in Photoshop

To extract a raw file with it’s settings from a Smart Object, double click on the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (or choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents) and, in the Camera Raw dialog, click the Save Image button in the lower left corner. (My first thought was to select the Smart Object in the Layers panel in Photoshop and choose Layer > Smart Objects > Export Contents. But surprisingly that method doesn’t export any edits made to the Smart Object.)

14) Adding Smart Filters to Smart Layers

The video below (3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters), demonstrates how to edit, mask, stack, move, duplicate, and change the blend mode and opacity of Smart Filters.

Or, click this link (Five Reasons to use Smart Filters in Photoshop) to view the 5 reasons as text.

15) Transforming a Regular Layer or Smart Object

When you’re transforming a smart object, the transformation’s anchor points are solid gray but when transforming a regular pixel based layer, the transformation’s anchor points are hollow? How’s that for nerdy Photoshop trivia!

: )

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December 19, 2017

 3, 2, 1, Photoshop !  Five Reasons to Use Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

This next installment of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! demonstrates five great reasons to use Smart objects in Photoshop CC.

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December 14, 2017

The Ruler, Note, and Count Tools in Photoshop CC

Here are some helpful tips for using the Ruler, Note, and Count tools – all of which are nested with the Eyedropper tool in Photoshop CC.

The Ruler Tool

  • If the horizon line (or anything else for that matter) is crooked in a layer, click-drag the Ruler tool along the current (angled) horizon. Then, click the Straighten Layer button in the Options bar to automatically straighten the layer (based on the angle specified by dragging). This is an fast way to straighten a layer to a precise numeric value, without affecting the entire the document.
  • After using the Ruler tool to take a measurement in a document, selecting Image > Image Rotation> Arbitrary will automatically enter the ruler measurement in the Rotate Canvas dialog box (and allow you to choose between rotating CW or CCW).
  • The Ruler tool can be used to measure an angle like a protractor. Drag the first line and then Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on the either endpoint and drag out the second line.  The angle can be viewed in either the Options bar or the Info panel.
  • The Ruler tool can also be used to make measurements using custom measurement scales and record these measurements in the Measurement panel (or output to a file). In fact, Photoshop can record measurements for several tools and can then calculate measurements such as area, perimeter and more. Click here to find out more information about the Ruler tool and recording measurements.

The Notes Panel

  • I often see customers create a new type layer and use it to add comments to a Photoshop document (perhaps a reminder to themselves or a question for the art director). However Photoshop has a (little known) dedicated Note tool specifically designed to add annotations to an image without cluttering up the Layers panel with additional type layers. Select the Note tool, and click in the image area (or beyond the canvas) to add a Note “marker”. Photoshop automatically displays the Note panel to add comments in a single, organized location.

  • If multiple people need to comment in a single document, use the Options bar to change the author name and note color for each person.
  • Command + H (Mac) | Control + H (Win) will hide Notes in a document (View > Show > Notes).

The Count Tool

  • With the Count tool selected, click in the image area to add a number. Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a number to delete.
  • Based on the content of the image, it can be useful to change the color and size of the marker and labels using the Options bar.
  • You can create as many groups of counts as needed and use the pull down menu in the Options bar to rename them.

And Photoshop trivia to impress your friends…  Photoshop CC (v14.1) increased the limit for the number of measurements from 700 to 10,000!  : P

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December 7, 2017

 Tasmania – Three Photos Before and After

I had time over the weekend to sit down and retouch some images from Tasmania and thought it might be interesting to write up a quick overview of the workflow. In a nutshell, the majority of edits were done in Lightroom Classic CC with a bit of retouching done in Photoshop CC. On the left are the original raw captures, the final images on the right.

First, for all three of the photographs, I used the Lens Correction panel to Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. In fact I change Lightroom’s default settings to enable Lightroom to apply these setting on import (this post will tell you how). Then, I cropped as needed. From there on, each image needed slightly different settings, so I will walk through each image separately.

My experience of photographing the dead trees along the waterline at Lake Gordon, felt far more dramatic when I was there, so my intent was to impart that same dramatic feeling through post processing. Below is the original, raw capture.

I made the following “global” changes using the Basic, Effects, and Details panels:

  • Increased the Temperature value to add warmth to the image.
  • Set new white and black points to extend the dynamic range of the original “flat” photograph.
  • Increase Clarity to exaggerate edge contrast in the midtones.
  • Increased the Dehaze value, however this pushed some of the shadow areas too dark, so I returned to the Basic panel to refine the black point.
  • Increased the amount of  Luminance and Color Noise Reduction in the Details panel.

Moving to the local adjustment tools, I started by adding three separate Graduated Filters:

  • The first one (starting in  the upper left, and reaching almost into the center of the photo), decreases exposure and shifts the Temperature towards yellow.
  • The second one (starting in the lower left and moving slightly into the image), “burns” the edge by lowering the Exposure value.
  • And infamy, the last one (starting at the bottom and moving upwards towards the center pf the photograph), adds Contrast and lightens Highlights (helping to separate the tree trunks from the background).

Finally, I selected the Adjustment Brush and made several small local adjustments:

  • The first one decreases the Exposure to darken the top left corner.
  • The second emphasizes the rays of light using Dehaze and Contrast.
  • The third increases Exposure the shadows in the tree area on the right.
  • And the fourth and final one shifts the temperature slider towards yellow in the center of the photograph.

When photographing the second location, I was impressed by the patterns made by the water flowing over the  sandbar. At the time, there was a bird singing nearby, and I remember wondering what the bird’s audio waves would look like if we could see them in the water. Regardless, my goal was to  accentuate the waves and patterns in Lightroom.The original raw capture below, was admittedly underexposed .

After applying Lens Corrections, cropping, and setting new black and white points, I  decreased the Highlights (to retain detail in the sand), add a bit of Dehaze, and decreased Saturation. I find that when using Dehaze on an image such as this one (when I’m using it more “creatively” and not necessarily to remove atmospheric haze), the image becomes overly saturated so I tend to lower the Saturation – but of course it’s a personal choice.

Then, I added two local adjustments using the Adjustment Brush:

  • The first darkens the  top right area of the water by decreasing Exposure.
  • The second adds additional Dehaze to the sandbar.

I then opened the file into Photoshop (16-bit, Adobe RGB, PSD file at 300 PPI). Using a combination of the Healing Brush and the Clone Stamp tool, I proceeded to remove the distracting flecks of sand as well as the plant in the lower right of the image.

Before and after retouching the sand in Photoshop.

I prefer to work with the Healing Brush as it’s typically faster when removing small elements. However if  the edges of the “healed” area soften the grain/noise pattern in the image (or make it “mushy”), I’ll switch to the Clone Stamp tool (even though in some instances it may take longer to match the colors/tone in the photograph).

The third photograph was taken from the passenger seat of a car. While I know that this isn’t optimal, if we stopped every time we saw a opportunity for a photograph, we would never have made it to our final destination! In this image, I wanted to accentuate the clouds over the mountains, the sunlight on the trees and, and mooo-ve a cow to higher ground. Below is the the original, raw capture.

After using the Lens Correction panel to remove distortions, cropping, and setting black and white points, I adjusted the White Balance – increasing the Temperature and decreasing the Tint sliders to remove the colder, blue cast. Then, I decreased the Highlights (to bring back detail in the clouds) and increased the Shadows (to reveal details in the trees). I refined the midtones by decreasing Exposure and increasing Contrast and added a slight increase in Clarity, while decreasing Saturation.

Then, I added two local adjustments:

  • Using the Adjustment Brush with an increased Exposure value, I lightened the front view of the trees.
  • I also used the graduated filter over the mountains and clouds  (set to increase Dehaze and reduce Saturation), however this adjustment also amplified the reflection from the car window (above the mountain –  center frame).

In Photoshop, I copied, pasted, and repositioned a “good” area of cloud to cover the reflection and used a Curves Adjustment layer to match the tonal values of the surrounding clouds (to restrict the effects of the Curves Adjustment Layer, I selected it and chose Layer > Create Clipping Mask). I then removed the distracting fence posts and, because the lonely cow at the bottom of the image was so close to the edge, I repositioned it a bit higher in the frame.

Please check out my additional images from Tasmania, on Behance, as well as my Portfolio page, in an Adobe Spark.

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December 5, 2017

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Ten Helpful Shortcuts for Working with Layer Masks in Photoshop CC

Discover 10 quick shortcuts that make working with Layer Masks in Photoshop easier than ever.

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November 29, 2017

8 Shortcuts for Working with Channels in Photoshop

1) Viewing Channels in Photoshop

When working in RGB:

  • Command + 2 (Mac) | Control + 2 (Win) displays the Composite (RGB) Channel.
  • Command + 3 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the Red Channel.
  • Command + 4 (Mac) | Control + 4 (Win) displays the Green Channel.
  • Command + 5 (Mac) | Control + 5 (Win) displays the Blue Channel.

When working in CMYK:

  • Command + 2 (Mac) | Control + 2 (Win) displays the Composite (CMYK) Channel.
  • Command + 3 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the Cyan Channel.
  • Command + 4 (Mac) | Control + 4 (Win) displays the Magenta Channel.
  • Command + 5 (Mac) | Control + 5 (Win) displays the Yellow Channel.
  • Command + 6 (Mac) | Control + 6 (Win) displays the Black Channel.

To revert back to the old behavior (PSCS3) select Window > Workspaces > Keyboard Shortcuts  & Menus and enable “Use Legacy Channel Shortcuts”. This remaps the shortcuts for showing channels two keys to the left. For example:

  • Command + ~ (Mac) | Control + ~ (Win) displays the Composite Channel
  • Command + 1 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the first channel of the document

2) Viewing Channels in Panel Based Adjustments

  • Option + 2, 3, 4, etc. (Mac) | Alt + 2, 3, 4, etc. (Win) displays the Composite, Red, Green, and Blue channels when using the panel-based adjustments such as a Curves Adjustment layer.

  • The Hue/Saturation and Selective Color commands are slightly different as they don’t map to just RGB/CMYK, however the same general rules apply: Option + 2 (Mac) | Alt + 2(Win)  selects the Master channel, and Opt+3, 4, etc. selects subsequent items in the list.

3) Saving Selections as Alpha Channels

After making complex selections, choose Select > Save Selection to save the selection as an alpha channel. Alpha channels can be saved in several file formats including  Photoshop and TIFF. (Note: alpha channels are not saved in the JPEG format.)

4) Loading Channels as Selections

After saving selections as channels, those channels can be loaded back into a selection with the following shortcuts:

  • Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) on the icon for a channel to load the channel as a selection.
  • Command + Shift -click (Mac) | Control + Shift -click (Win)  to add additional channels to the selection.
  • Command + Option -click (Mac) | Control + Alt -click (Win) to subtract another channel from the selection.
  • Command + Option + Shift-click (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift -click (Win) to create the intersection of two channels.

5) Spot Color Channels in Photoshop

Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) the new channel icon on the Channels panel to create a new Spot Color channel. (Spot Color channels are used primarily for printing using additional “spot colors” on the printing press.)

6) Viewing Individual Channels

During a Free Transform, using the Place command, and /or when Cropping, the opacity of layers as well as the visibility of individual channels can be changed on their respective panels (although not with the use of keyboard shortcuts). Note: this can be especially useful when using alpha channels and/or with alignment of layers.

7) Display Channels in Color

To display the Channels in the Channels panel in color, choose Preferences > Interface > and enable Show Channels in Color.

8) Loading the Luminosity of an Image as a Selection

Option + Command + 2 (Mac) | Alt + Control +2 (Win) loads the luminosity of an image as a selection. This can then be used for a variety of manipulations such as adjusting color or building density.

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November 21, 2017

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Four Quick Ways to Use Photoshop’s Fill Command

Discover how to use the Fill command in Photoshop CC. Quickly fill areas in an image with color, patterns, history, and the content aware technology to remove distracting elements in an image.

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November 14, 2017

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters

In this episode (3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters ), you’ll discover how to edit, mask, stack, move, duplicate, and change blend mode and the opacity of Smart Filters.

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November 8, 2017

The Key to Using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop, you’ll discover how to use Smart Guides to quickly align and distribute layers and shapes in Photoshop CC.

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October 18, 2017

Adobe Announces New Features for Photoshop CC 2018

I’m excited to announce new and improved features in Photoshop CC 2018!

Color and Luminance Range Masking in Adobe Camera Raw

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to make precise adjustments using the new  Color and Luminance Range Masking in Adobe Camera Raw.

New Brush Preset Management  in Photoshop CC 

In this video, Julieanne takes a look at several improvements made to the way we work with brushes in Photoshop CC including more powerful brush presets, new default brushes, drag and drop organization, and more!

Watch to find out more about:

  • New default brushes by Kyle Webster.
  • Renamed panels, the zoom slider and independent controls to display brush attributes.
  • Reordering brushes and organizing into Groups.
  • Saving tool options with Brush Presets.
  • Loading legacy brushes and tool presets.

Here are three additional shortcuts for working with Brush Groups:

  • Command -click  (Mac) | Control -click  (Win) the disclosure triangle next to a Brush Group to expand/collapse all Brush Groups in the panel.
  • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the disclosure triangle to expand/collapse all groups nested within the current Brush Group.
  • Option + Command -click (Mac) | Alt + Control -click (Win) the disclosure triangle to expand and collapse all Brush groups (nested or not).

Brush Stroke Smoothing and Paint Symmetry in Photoshop CC 

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how the new smoothing option can help create beautiful brush strokes with the Brush, Pencil, Mixer Brush, and Eraser tools as well as how to use the Paint Symmetry technology preview to make symmetrical brush marks in Photoshop CC.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Stroke Catch Up , Adjust For Zoom, Catch-Up On Stroke End, and Pulled String Brush Stroke Smoothing modes.
  • Brush leash preferences.
  • Selecting different Paint Symmetry axis.
  • Performance improvements when painting on large documents, HiDPI screens, and large brushes.

Here are three additional shortcuts for working with the Smoothing option.

  • Option -tap (Mac) | Alt -tap (Win) a numeric key to add the percentage of the tapped number (1 = 10%, 2= 20% etc.). 
  • Option -taping (Mac) | Alt -tapping (Win) two numbers quickly will give you that exact amount (5 + 4 = 54% , 00 = 0%).
  • To disable smoothing completely, use the Smoothing option in the Brush Settings panel.

Note: if you prefer to turn smoothing off for all brushes (when painting in a layer mask for example), click the lock icon next to the Smoothing option in the Brush Settings panel (locking the setting allows you to select different brushes while keeping the Smoothing locked).

The New Curvature Pen Tool in Photoshop CC

Discover how easy it is to draw resolution independent, scalable vector paths in Photoshop CC with the new Curvature Pen tool.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Creating paths by simply clicking points in the shape of the curve, rather than the click -drag motion the traditional Pen tool requires.
  • Adding, subtracting, repositioning, and converting control points using the Curvature Pen tool.  
  • Converting a path to a shape.
  • Using the Path Select or Direct Select tools to modify paths.

Note: To change the default color and thickness for paths, choose Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.

Variable Fonts and additional Typographic Enhancements in Photoshop CC 

Discover the power of  Variable Fonts and additional typographic enhancements in Photoshop CC.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Quickly finding, previewing and modifying the attributes of variable fonts and transitional forms.
  • Enhancements to the Properties panel.
  • Pasting type with or without formatting.
  • Copy and paste multiple type layers at one time within Photoshop.
  • Paragraph-level composer switching.

Rich Tooltips and the Learn Panel 

Photoshop has two new features to help new customers get started – Rich Tooltips and the Learn panel.

Hover the cursor over many of the more popular tools in the Tool panel PS displays a description and short animation of the tool in action (the animations will play twice, then disappear).

Some Rich Tooltips have links that, when clicked, display the Learn Panel. The Learn panel provides interactive step-by-step tutorials guiding you through basic concepts of Photoshop including: photography, retouching, combining images, and graphic design fundamentals. Note: You can also display the Learn panel by selecting Window > Learn. 

Selecting a tutorial, automatically opens a sample file. In addition to the instructions in the panel, pop-ups appear to help guide you through the steps.

To hide rich tool tips, select Preferences > Tools and uncheck Use Rich Tooltips.

Accessing Lightroom Photos from the Photoshop CC Start Screen

You can now use the Photoshop Start Screen to access photographs that are synced in the cloud via Lightroom. For those that want a more mobile workflow, this is another step towards device independence: sign on to any computer using your Adobe ID, launch Photoshop and choose LR Photos to see your synced photographs. The new LR Photos workflow in Photoshop works well  for customers that don’t necessarily have the Lightroom desktop application installed (in a classroom environment, or because they primarily use Lightroom on mobile for example) and still want to access their files in Lightroom’s cloud.

  • If you have imported photos using the all-new Lightroom CC, Lightroom on mobile, and /or Lightroom on web, LR Photos can access to the full-resolution photographs stored in the cloud.
  • If you have synced files using Collections in  Lightroom Classic, LR Photos can access to the lower resolution proxies called Smart Previews. Smart Previews have a maximum dimension of 2560 px on the long side.

Note: if you are using a computer that has either of the Lightroom desktop applications installed (the all-new Lightroom CC or Lightroom Classic CC), you may prefer to launch the desktop application, select the desired images, and use the Edit-In Photoshop command to hand-off a copy of the file to Photoshop. The advantage of this workflow is that, when you’re finished editing the image in Photoshop and chose to save and close the file, Photoshop will then hand the file back to Lightroom where it will be added to the Library automatically. 

To view additional images in LR Photos:

  • Click “See More” to view all Recently Taken photos in a flat view.
  • If you’re using Lightroom CC, you may see Folders containing Albums as well as “loose” albums. Click a Folder to view the containing Albums. Click on an album to view it’s contents.
  • If you’re using Lightroom Classic, you will see your synced Collections (Collections are called Albums in the Photoshop Start screen, in Lightroom mobile, and Lightroom web). Click on an album to view it’s contents.

When you select the photo(s) and choose Import Selected, Photoshop downloads and opens a copy of the photo.

  • Because Lightroom CC stores the original photo in the cloud, Photoshop downloads a full-resolution copy of the image and opens the copy.
  • Because Lightroom Classic stores Smart Previews in the cloud, Photoshop downloads a copy of the Smart Preview and opens the copy. To help identify Smart Previews, Photoshop displays a black/white striped circular icon in the lower right of the thumbnail.

  • Note: one exception, if a photograph originates in Lightroom mobile or Lightroom web and is synced to Lightroom Classic, the full-resolution original is stored in the cloud (as well as is downloaded locally).

The file type determines how Photoshop opens the copy of the file:

  • JPEG files that haven’t been edited in Lightroom (don’t have any edit settings applied), will open directly into Photoshop.
  • JPEG files that have been edited (have edits applied) in Lightroom, will open in Camera Raw.
  • DNG  and any proprietary raw files, will open in Camera Raw.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file synced from Lightroom Classic (Smart Preview), will open as a flattened document.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file from Lightroom CC will open as layered document.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file with Lightroom adjustments from either version of Lightroom will open as a flattened document.

Saving Changes

  • When you are finished making changes, choose File > Save (in Photoshop) to save the file. (Because Photoshop downloads a copy of the original photo, changes made in Photoshop won’t effect the original).
  • To add the file to Lightroom (after saving), click the Quick Share icon and choose Add to Lightroom Photos. The new file will be uploaded to the cloud and will be synchronized across devices.

Lightroom Photos Image Search using Adobe Sensei.

  • Click the Search icon to take advantage of Adobe Sensei’s artificial intelligence and machine learning to quickly find photos based on image content.

Photoshop displays images for LR Photos that match your search criteria as well as images from Adobe Stock.  

To access and open additional files from Lr Photos when a document is already open, choose Edit > Search and click Lr Photos.

Complete spherical 360 pano workflow in Photoshop CC

This video by Russell Preston Brown  gives you a quick overview of the new 360 spherical panoramic editing capabilities found in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018.  


Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

Copy and Paste Multiple Layers

  • You can now copy and paste multiple layers in Photoshop—within a document and between documents—using the Copy, Paste, and Paste Into Place commands (this includes any type of layer:  shape, type, smart object, etc. and will also include masks).

Expanded Sharing Options

  • You can now share your creations to several services directly from within Photoshop by selecting File > Share or, clicking the Quick Share icon. For most services and social media channels, Photoshop will automatically convert the document to the JPEG format before sharing.
  • The OS determines the actual list of services appearing in the Share panel so different operating system will display different options. To tweak these preferences on Mac, use System Preferences > Extensions > Share Menu to add/remove services to the Share panel.
  • Windows always shares the current size of open document. On Mac, you can choose to share the file at the original or small size (constrained to 1200 px on the long side). Note: when using Quick Share to Add to Lightroom Photos, Photoshop will always share the original size.  

Deeply Integrated Adobe Stock Content

  • Photoshop makes it easier than ever to work with Adobe Stock. In the Properties panel, you can now:
    • View the asset on stock.adobe.com by clicking the asset ID (Adobe Stock File #).
    • License a preview image directly from the Properties panel.
    • Click Find Similar to quickly find additional stock assets on stock.adobe.com.

Microsoft Surface Dial

  • Photoshop supports the Microsoft Dial on bluetooth-enabled computers running the latest version of Windows 10 as a technology preview. The dial enables customers to change tool parameters such as brush size, opacity, hardness, flow, and smoothing without taking their attention from the canvas.

Improved Image Resize

  • Photoshop has an improved image size algorithm designed to detect and preserve the most important details and textures in images when resizing images, without introducing over-sharpening of prominent edges or smoothing out lower contrast details.  In addition to skin tones and hair textures, the technology improves preservation of harder-edged details like text and logos. To enable the technology, choose Preferences > Technology Preview > Enable Preserve Details 2.0 Upscale. Note: when using Image Size, Photoshop uses Preserve Details 1.0 when the Resample option is set to Automatic, even if the technology preview is enabled.

Save As PNG

  • When saving as PNG, Photoshop applies much better compression in far less time.

High Efficiency Image Format (HEIF)

  • Photoshop now supports Apple’s High Efficiency Image Format (HEIF). If the HEIF file contains a depth map, Photoshop can read, edit, and utilize the depth map (an alpha channel) to create a depth-of-field effect using the Lens Blur filter (Filter > Blur > Lens Blur (for example). Note: Adding contrast to the alpha channel can improve the alpha channel for the Lens Blur effect.

Performance Improvements:

  • Photoshop has improved the performance of many common tasks including:
    • File > Open  and File > New launch times.
    • Startup performance on Windows.
    • Common blending and compositing operations, Surface Blur, and Noise > Median filters.
    • Virtual memory system.

Improved Retouching Tools

  • Face-Aware Liquify detects more faces and gives more accurate results in when heads are smaller, rotated/turned or have more of their forehead concealed.
  • Face details are more protected when using Content-Aware Move, Auto Levels, Curves, Tone, Brightness, Contrast, and skin tone color range.
  • Content-Aware Crop and Content-Aware Fill creates better results on edges.
  • Select and Mask task space improvements include:
    • Improved Refine Edge tool accuracy (especially when the foreground and background color are visually similar).
    • Improved blending of original selection and matting results.
    • Transparency settings are no longer shared between Select & Mask and Quick Mask view modes.
    • Overlay view mode transparency settings are now decoupled from On White and On Black transparency settings.
    • New Decontamination slider control.
    • Ability to change Hardness, Spacing, Roundness, and angle for the Quick Select tool.  

Removed Items

  • The preference option for controlling the Recent Files behavior has been removed as has the workspace (and extension).
  • The Device Preview extension has been removed.
  • The CC Libraries “Auto-create from document” dialog that often popped up when opening files has been removed but, you can still create a CC library from a document through the CC Libraries panel pop-out menu.
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