Posts in Category "Adobe Photoshop"

May 2, 2016

Resetting Tool Options in Photoshop

Control -click (Mac) / Right -click (Win) the tool icon in the Options bar (officially called the Tool Preset Picker) and choose Reset Tool or Reset All Tools to set the tool(s) options (found in the Options bar) to their default state(s). This shortcut is a great way to trouble shoot why a tool might not be working the way that you think it should – perhaps you changed the tool’s blend mode, feather, or other option the last time you used it, and have since forgotten to set it back.
Note: this shortcut doesn’t reset the visibility or grouping of the tools, only their options.

5:06 AM Comments (3) Permalink
April 26, 2016

Paste Into a Selection in Photoshop

If you have an active selection in your document (marching ants) and have content on the clipboard, selecting Edit > Paste Special > Paste Into will paste the content from the clipboard onto a new layer  and automatically convert the selection into a Layer mask!

Command + Option + Shift + V (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + V (Win) is the shortcut for Paste Into.

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Image with active selection.

 

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Selection converted to a layer mask after choosing Edit > Paste Special > Paste Into.

5:07 AM Comments (0) Permalink
April 25, 2016

Targeting a Layer Mask in Photoshop

Command + \ (Mac), Control + \ (Win) targets a layer mask.

Command + 2 (Mac), Control + 2 (Win) targets the layer.

4:54 AM Comments (4) Permalink
April 22, 2016

Pasting into a Layer Mask in Photoshop

To paste content (from the clipboard) into a Layer mask, Option -click (Mac)/ Alt -click (Win) the Layer mask icon on the Layers panel. This shortcut does two things – it targets the mask as well as toggles off the visibility of the mask. Then, choose Edit > Paste to paste into the mask.

Note: if you don’t want to use the shortcut, you can paste into a layer mask by clicking on the mask in the Channels panel and toggling ON the visibility.  Choosing Edit > Paste will paste into the mask, displaying the mask as a red overlay.04_22chanelVis

To hide the red overlay, click the eye icon.04_22chanelHide04_22_toggleVis

5:17 AM Comments (1) Permalink
April 21, 2016

Unlinking Masks from Layers in Photoshop

Click on the link icon between the layer icon and the mask icon in the Layers panel to unlink the mask from the layer (allowing either to move independently of the other).

04_20_Link Maks

5:15 AM Comments (0) Permalink
April 20, 2016

Temporarily Disabling & Enabling Masks in Photoshop

Shift-click in the layer or vector mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to temporarily disable the mask.

Click again on the layer mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to enable it.

For a vector mask, you must shift -click the thumbnail again to enable it.

You can also Control-click (Mac) / Right mouse -click (Win) on either type of mask in the Layers panel and choose to Enable or Disable a mask.

4:54 AM Comments (0) Permalink
April 18, 2016

Vector Masks Visibility in Photoshop

Clicking on the Vector mask icon in the Layers Panel will toggle the path’s visibility.

When the path is visible, drawing a path with the Pen tool (or a Shape tool with the tool mode in the Options bar set to Path), will add to the mask.

When the path is hidden, drawing with the Pen tool (or a Shape tool with the tool mode in the Options bar set to Path) creates a new Work Path.

5:04 AM Permalink
April 6, 2016

Double Check the Layer Mask in Photoshop

When working on intricately composited, multi-layered documents, I often find it useful to check each of the layer masks before finalizing the image. To do this, Option -click (Mac) / Alt -click (Win) on the mask thumbnail in the Layers panel to display the mask in the image area. With the mask visible, check to see if there are any unwanted or awkward transitional areas that might not have been visible in the complex composite (a sharp edge from a selection or a small area unknowingly left unpainted, for example).

6:04 AM Permalink
April 5, 2016

Introduction to Photo Compositing Course on Lynda.com

 

2014-11_LDCIntroLREven if you’re not a member of Lynda.com, a portion of each of my video courses are available for free. If you’re interested in Learning about Compositing, here are two free videos from my Introduction to Photo Compositing course:

Unifying images through subject and theme 

Unifying images through composition

The complete course is available for paid members. Click here for more information or to start your free trial.

 

5:29 AM Permalink
March 21, 2016

Using Photoshop Actions and Droplets with Lightroom

Learn how to use Photoshop Actions to create Droplets that can be used in Lightroom to batch process images after exporting files.

Note: Although this video was recorded in previous versions of Lightroom and Photoshop, the technique will still work today and, in fact, you could create conditional actions and process both vertical and horizontal files at one time! Click here to find out more about conditional actions in Photoshop.

5:00 AM Permalink
March 15, 2016

Preview Adjustment Layer Changes in Photoshop

While making changes to an image using an adjustment layer, hold the “\” (backslash) key to toggle between the before state (when you started making changes) and the current state (the changes you’ve made).

5:25 AM Permalink
March 3, 2016

Decreasing File Size in Photoshop

When compositing several images in a single document I often find that a portion of a layer (or portions of multiple layers) will end up being positioned outside of the visible image area. Photoshop, of course, is still keeping track of this information (in case I choose to reposition the layer), but when I’m certain that I will no longer need it, I can choose Select > All and then Image > Crop. This eliminates unnecessary information outside or beyond the visible image area and will typically help to keep my file size more manageable.

Note: when working with Smart Objects, Photoshop will still keep the additional information, regardless of whether or not you crop the document.

5:48 AM Permalink
March 2, 2016

Adding Canvas Size in Photoshop

One can always select Image > Canvas Size to numerically add or subtract to the width or height of one’s image, but if you would rather eyeball it, try using the Crop tool. Drag out a crop marquee and release the mouse. Then, grab one of the anchor points and drag it beyond the visible image area. When the crop is applied,the area outside of the image and within the crop marquee will be added to the image canvas.

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Note: to add transparency around the image (instead of filling the added space with the background color), convert the Background into a layer by clicking the Lock icon (on the Layers panel) before cropping.

5:43 AM Permalink
February 29, 2016

Multiple Undo in Photoshop

• Command + Z (Mac) | Control  + Z (Win) will toggle undo/redo of the last command.

• Option + Command  + Z (Mac) | Alt + Control + Z (Win) will step you back through history.

• Command + Shift + Z (Mac) | Control + Shift + Z (Win) will step you forward through history.

To change the number of history states (multiple undo’s) that Photoshop keeps track of while an image is open, select Preferences > Performance and enter a value for History States. Setting a higher number (100 for example) will save more changes, and allow you to step farther back in time, however it will also require Photoshop to keep track of more information in RAM (or, when all of the RAM is in use, using the scratch disk). Making large changes to the entire document (adding layers, running filters etc.), requires keeping track of more history than smaller changes (such as small, localized strokes with the Healing Brush). Therefore, if you increase the number of states and notice a performance hit, trying lowering the number again.

You can also manually set the Cache Levels and Cache Tile Size in the Performance Preferences. If you use relatively small files—roughly 1 megapixel or 1280 by 1024 pixels—and many layers (50 or more), set Cache Levels to 1 or 2. Setting Cache Levels to 1 disables image caching; only the current screen image is cached (however, you may not get high-quality results with some Photoshop features if you set Cache Levels to 1). If you use files with larger pixel dimensions—say, 50 megapixels or larger—set Cache Levels higher than 4. Higher cache levels speed up redrawing.

Click here for more information about optimizing Photoshop’s performance. https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/optimize-photoshop-cc-performance.html

5:39 AM Permalink
February 26, 2016

The Magnetic Lasso Tool Shortcuts

When using the Magnetic Lasso tool, the following shortcuts can help to quickly change tool options.

[ or ] decreases/increases the lasso width

[ or ] + Shift goes to the minimum/maximum lasso width

‘,’ (comma) or ‘.’ (period) decreases/increases the edge contrast

‘,’ (comma) or ‘.’ (period) + Shift goes to the minimum/maximum edge contrast

‘;’ (semicolon) or ‘’’ (apostrophe) decreases/increases the frequency

‘;’ (semicolon) or ‘’’ (apostrophe) + Shift goes to the minimum/maximum frequency

5:18 AM Permalink