Posts in Category "Video Tutorials"

May 8, 2017

Tips for Working with Color in Photoshop CC

Here are my favorite tips for working with color in Photoshop CC.

1) The Foreground / Background Color Picker

  • Tap the “D” key to set the foreground/background colors to black/white. If a Layer mask is selected, tapping the “D” key will set the foreground/background colors to white/black.
  • Tap the “X” key to exchange the foreground and background colors on the tool bar.
  • To display the Foreground/Background color picker using a keyboard shortcut, choose Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Under “Shortcuts For”, select “Tools” and scroll the to (almost) the bottom of the list to locate the Foreground Color Picker  or Background Color Picker line item. Click to the right of the item and enter a own custom keyboard shortcut. Note:  “N” and ”K are not assigned to tools in Photoshop’s default set.


2) The Color Panel

  • The Color panel can be enlarged (drag the bottom of the panel), to make color selection easier and more accurate.
  • Select Hue Cube from the Color panel’s fly-out menu to make it look similar to the Foreground Color picker ‘s default state.
  • To change the color sliders on the Color panel, click the panel’s drop down menu and select from Grayscale, RGB, HSB, CMYK, LAB, or Web Color Sliders.
  • Shift -click on the Color panel’s color ramp to cycle through the available color modes.
  • Use the Color panel’s fly-out menu to either Copy Color as HTML or Copy Color’s Hex Code.
  • If you have ever tried selecting a new foreground color using the eyedropper tool only to have the background color updated, make sure that in the Color panel you have the foreground color swatch selected. If, for some reason you have selected the background color swatch, every time you use the eyedropper it will update the background color!

    On the left the Foreground color swatch is selected, on the right, the Background color swatch is selected.

    On the left, the Foreground color swatch is selected in the Color panel and has a thin highlight surrounding it. On the right, the Background color swatch is selected.

 

3) The Swatches Panel

  • Recently used colors are displayed across the top of the Swatches panel. Hover the cursor over a swatch to display the color name or color value in a tool-tip.
  • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) a color swatch to delete it (the icon swaps to a pair of scissors).
  • While viewing the Swatches panel in thumbnail view ( Tiny, Small, or Large), positioning the cursor over a gray, empty swatch area and clicking will add a new swatch based on the currently selected foreground color (the icon swaps to the paint bucket icon).
  • Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) over any color swatch to select New Swatch, Rename Swatch, or Delete Swatch.
  • Photoshop has two options for saving swatches from the Swatches panel:
    • Choose Save Swatches (.aco) to save a set of color swatches to be used in Photoshop.
    • Choose Save Swatches for Exchange (.ase) to save a set of color swatches to be loaded into Illustrator and InDesign.
  • Swatches can be saved to any location, however swatches saved to the default location (User > Library > Application Support > Adobe > Adobe Photoshop 2017 > Presets > Color Swatches will appear automatically from the Swatches panel’s drop down menu.
  • To load swatch files from an HTML, CSS, or SVG Document, use the flyout menu on the Swatches panel to choose Load Swatches. Then, navigate to any HTML, CSS, or SVG document and Photoshop will find all of the colors used in that document and load them as swatches.
  • Note: color swatches can also be saved in the Libraries panel. One advantage of using the Libraries panel, is that stored content is automatically synchronized between multiple installs of Photoshop using the same Adobe ID (for example, your work and home computers). In addition, Libraries can be shared with others using the fly-out menu and selecting Collaborate or Share link.

 

4) The Heads-Up-Display (HUD) Color Picker

  • Control + Option + Command -click (Mac) | Shift + Alt + right-click with a painting tool selected to display the HUD color picker.
  • The HUD can be displayed as either a strip or a wheel (select the shape and size from Preferences > General HUD Color Picker).
  • When selecting colors you’ll quickly discover that you will need to jump from one portion of the HUD interface to another. To do so, continue to hold the mouse down while releasing the shortcuts keys and press the spacebar. The spacebar freezes the selection of the color and allows you to “jump” from the strip or wheel to the Hue/Saturation area (or vice versa) in order to refine one with out moving the other.  This shortcut is a bit tricky when you first start using it, but makes the HUD color picker infinitely more useful.

 

5) Finding the Average Color

Filter > Blur > Average finds the average of all of the colors in an image (or in a selection) and fills the entire image (or selection) with that color.
6) Inverting the Foreground Color

This JavaScript inverts the foreground color in Photoshop. To install:

  1. Click on the link ( InvertForeGroundColor.jsx ) to download and unzip the file.
  2. Quit Photoshop.
  3. Place the script in Applications/Adobe Photoshop CC 2017/Presets/Scripts folder.
  4. Launch Photoshop.
  5. Select a foreground color.
  6. Choose File > Script > invertForeGroundClor

To make it easier to access, assign a keyboard shortcut to the script (Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts, selecting Shortcuts For: Application Menus and scrolling down to File >Scripts >InvertForeGroundClor
7) Color Basics in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover the many ways to select colors in Photoshop in this free video (Color Basics), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: The Basics on Lynda.com.
8) Using Color to Add Emotional Impact to a Photograph

In this Episode of the Complete Picture Julieanne discusses how the addition of color as well as supporting imagery can help reinforce the mood and message of a composite image that a single photograph may fail to do on it’s own.  AfiBD0Ax4uw

 

5:33 AM Permalink
May 1, 2017

Essential Tips for Cropping in Photoshop CC

Here are my favorite shortcuts for Photoshop’s Crop tool!

01) Shortcuts

  • “C” selects the Crop tool.
  • “X” swaps the width and height values Or, click the arrow icon in the Options bar.
  • “O” cycles through view overlays (Rule of Thirds, Grid, etc.).
  • “H” hides the image area beyond (outside of) the Crop marquee.  Note: the forward slash key (/) also works.
  • To cancel a crop, tap the escape key. To apply the crop, tap the enter key, double click inside of the crop marquee, or choose another tool from the tool bar (this last method displays the “Crop the image?” dialog).
  • Command  (Mac) | Control  (Win) with the Crop tool selected, temporarily enables the Straighten option.
  • “I” auto-populates the Width, Height, and Resolution with the dimensions of the active document. Note: you must make an adjustment to the Crop marquee before tapping the “I” key, otherwise Photoshop will select the Eyedropper tool.
  • “P” enables Classic Mode (in Classic Mode, the Crop marquee is repositioned, not the image). Note: you must make an adjustment to the Crop marquee before tapping the “P” key, otherwise Photoshop will select the Pen tool.

02) Click-drag the Crop Marquee

When you first select the Crop tool, most people don’t know that you can click-drag in the image area to define the Crop (instead of adjusting the crop handles that appear around the image by default).

03) Crop, then Crop Again

After applying a crop, Photoshop automatically hides the crop marquee even though the Crop tool is still selected. If you want to use the Crop tool again, click in the image area to display the crop marquee or,  click-drag in the image area to define a crop.

04) Cropping to a Specific Ratio or File Size

With the Crop tool selected, choose Ratio from the Aspect Ratio/Crop Size drop-down menu in the Options bar and enter values to constrain the crop to a specific aspect ratio. Choose W x H x Resolution from the Aspect Ratio/Crop Size drop-down menu to enter specific values and crop to a specific image dimension. You can also choose from the preset values in the drop-down list (for either Aspect Ratio or Crop size) or, enter your own values and choose New Crop Preset to add the values to the drop-down.

05) Cropping to Another Image’s Dimensions (File Size)

To use the dimensions of one image to crop another image, select the document with the desired dimensions and select Front Image from the Aspect Ratio/Crop Size drop-down menu to auto-populate the width, height and resolution (or tap “I”). Then, switch to the document that needs to be cropped/resized and drag out the Crop marquee. When the crop is applied, the image will be resized to match the width, height, and resolution of the initial image. To save file size dimensions or aspect ratios (for reuse on future files) choose “New Crop Preset” from the Aspect Ratio/Crop Size drop-down menu.

Note: if an image needs to be resized when cropping, Photoshop uses the image interpolation option set in Preferences > General. The default setting, Bicubic  Automatic, enables Photoshop to chose the best resampling method based on the document type and whether the document is scaling up or down.

06) Setting One Dimension in the Crop Tool

If you need an image to be a certain height (4 inches for example) but want to keep the width flexible, choose  W x H x Resolution from the Aspect Ratio/Crop Size drop-down menu in the Options bar and enter “4in” for the height while leaving the width value empty.

07) Crop Options in Context Sensitive Menus

When using the Crop tool, Control -click (Mac) | Right -click (Win) within the Crop marquee enables quick access to the majority of options associated with the crop tool (including Reset Crop, Rotate Crop Box, Default Aspect Ratios, etc.).  Note: most tools in Photoshop have context sensitive menus designed to increase efficiency so be sure to give them a try.

08) Crop Tool Snaps to Edge

By default, the Crop Tool is set to “Snap To” the edges of the document. While the snapping behavior is useful, it can make it difficult to crop close to the edge of an image. To disable the snapping behavior, choose View > Snap To and toggle off (uncheck) Document Bounds. To temporarily disable this “Snap To” behavior, press and hold the Control key while dragging the Crop marquee near the edges of the document.  Note: there are additional options under View > Snap To including Grid, Guides, Layers, and Slices.

09) Cropping to a Selection in Photoshop

If a document has an active selection when the Crop tool is selected, Photoshop automatically matches the Crop marquee to the bounding rectangle of the selection. If you don’t want to crop to the selection, tapping the escape key will reset the crop to the image bounds (or as close to the image bounds as possible if there is an aspect ratio set for the Crop tool in the options bar). Repositioning the Crop marquee deselects the area. Note: Artboards don’t share this behavior.

10) Adding Canvas Using the Crop Tool

To use the Crop tool to add canvas to an image, drag the crop handles outside of the image area and apply the crop. To add transparency around the image (instead of filling the added canvas with the background color), convert the Background into a layer before using the Crop tool by selecting Layer > New > Layer From Background (or by clicking on the lock icon to the right of the word Background in the Layers panel).

11) Maintaining Flexibility when Cropping

To crop an image, yet retain the cropped area outside of the Crop marquee, uncheck Delete Cropped Pixels in the Options bar.

12) Reducing File Size by Deleting Content Outside of the Visible Image Area

To permanently delete information that extends beyond the visible image area (the canvas), select the Crop tool, check Delete Cropped Pixels in the Options bar, and tap Return (Mac) | Enter (Win). Photoshop previews any information that extends beyond the visible image area. Tap Return (Mac) | Enter (Win) again to apply the crop. Saving the document after cropping this way is permanent, so be sure that you won’t need to move/reposition/resize layers. Note: When working with Smart Objects, any extra image that extends beyond the visible canvas will not be deleted.

A second method would be to choose Select > Select All and then Image > Crop.

13) Straightening Images with the Crop Tool

When using the Crop tool’s Straighten option, the entire document (including all layers), are straightened. To straighten only a selected layer, use the Ruler tool.

14) Tool Presets

Tool Presets can increase our productivity by saving commonly used tool options.  After setting tool options in the Options bar, click the tool icon at the far left of the Options bar to display the Tool Presets Picker. Click the New Preset icon (the dog-eared page icon) to save your preset. The next time you need to use the tool with those settings, select it from the Tool Preset Picker.

15) Content Aware Cropping In Photoshop CC

When using the Crop tool, the Content Aware option can intelligently fill in transparent areas with computer generated “Content aware” information. The video below demonstrates how.

16) Using the Crop Tool in Photoshop CC

Discover tips and techniques for using the Crop tool in Photoshop in this free video (The Crop Tool), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: The Basics on Lynda.com.

 

 

17) Crop and Straighten Photos in Photoshop CC

To speed up scanning or photographing multiple images, it might be faster to scan them as a single document. Then, choose File > Automate > Crop and Straighten Photos to automate the “cutting apart” of the images into their own documents.

18) Using the Perspective Crop Tool in Photoshop CC

Discover tips and techniques for using the Perspective Crop tool in Photoshop in this free video (Using the Perspective Crop tool), from Photoshop CC 2015 Essential Training: The Basics on Lynda.com.

 

5:36 AM Permalink
March 23, 2017

Sync and Reposition Local Adjustments Between Images in Lightroom CC

Lightroom’s ability to sync local adjustments between images can help increase your productivity when workignwith several, similar images. This video (Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC), will show you how.  (The link above should take you directly to the portion of the demo that covers syncing local adjustments from 6:15 – 7:20).

Note: if it’s easier, you can use the Copy… button (located at the bottom of the left panels in the Develop module) to copy Local Adjustments. Then select a different image, and paste those adjustments. It just depends on your workflow.

4:52 AM Permalink
March 22, 2017

Assigning Keywords using the Painter Tool in Lightroom CC

In this video (Hidden Gems in Lightroom CC), you’ll discover how to access Recently Used Keywords as well as Saved Keyword Sets using the Painter tool in Lightroom CC. Note, the link above should take you directly to the keywording portion of the demo (1:50 – 2:55).

4:50 AM Permalink
March 20, 2017

Using the Painter tool to Add Images to a Collection in Lightroom

To use the Painter tool to add images to a collection in Lightroom, in the Library module, right-click on a regular collection (not a smart collection) and choose Set as Target Collection. Then, select the painter tool and choose Target Collection from the list of Paint options. While the painter tool is selected, clicking on an image in the grid to add it to the collection. You can also click – drag across multiple images to add them to the target collection.

The video below demonstrates how to set a target collection when creating collection, tapping the “B” key to add an image to the targeted collection as well as using the Painter tool to add images to a collection (2:15):

5:10 AM Permalink
February 27, 2017

The Secret Power of the Quick Develop Module in Lightroom CC

The Quick Develop panel is an excellent way to make relative changes to large numbers of images. For example, lets assume that yesterday you retouched a series of images in the Develop module – making slight changes to each image’s exposure. Today however, you are finding that they are all about +1/3 of a stop too dark (perhaps you were tired when editing or had too much coffee or whatever). If you were to add +1/3 of a stop to one of the images in the Develop Module (that perhaps you had already increased by 1/2 stop ( or +.5) yesterday) the Exposure slider would read +.83 (.5 + .33 = .83). Using the Sync command in the Develop Module to apply that change to other selected images, will NOT add +1/3 (.33) of a stop to each already manipulated image – instead it will change all of the other image’s exposure value to the same exposure value of the image being “Synced” from (+.83). If on the other hand, you have that same series of images with individually corrected exposure values, and in Quick Develop you clicked on the single arrow next to exposure (to add 1/3 of a stop), Lightroom would add +.33 to all images. Secret power!
And here is a video demonstrating this.

5:28 AM Permalink
February 16, 2017

Setting a Preview Size on Import in Lightroom

If you choose to build “Standard” previews (under the File Handling panel options) when importing files into Lightroom CC, the size of the preview will automatically adjust to the resolution of your monitor. To designate a specific preview size, select  Catalog Settings > File Handling and in the Preview Cache area, select a specific size from the drop down menu. This can be helpful if you know that you are importing files while connected to a lower/higher resolution monitor than you will be editing them on.

5:34 AM Permalink
January 20, 2017

Video – Creative Blurring Along a Path in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how to add motion blur to images in this free video (Creative Blurring Along a Path in Photoshop CC 2017), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Photography on Lynda.com.

5:30 AM Permalink
January 18, 2017

Video Tutorial – Creating a Tilt Shift Effect in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how to create a Tilt Shift effect using Blur Gallery in this free video (Creating a Tilt-Shift Effect in Photoshop), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Photography on Lynda.com.

5:25 AM Permalink
January 11, 2017

Adding Texture to a Photo in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how to add texture to a photo in this free video from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Photography on Lynda.com. https://www.lynda.com/Photoshop-tutorials/Adding-texture-photo/518166/557005-4.html

5:12 AM Permalink
January 10, 2017

Photographic Toning Techniques in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how easy it is to emulate traditional photographic techniques in this free video (Photographic Toning Techniques in Photoshop CC 2017), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Photography on Lynda.com.

 

5:05 AM Permalink
January 9, 2017

Creating Artboards in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how Create Artboards in this free video (Creating Artboards in Photoshop CC 2017), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

5:03 AM Permalink
January 6, 2017

Working with Adobe Stock in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how easy it is to work with Adobe Stock content in this free video (Working with Adobe Stock in Photoshop CC 2017), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

5:10 AM Permalink
January 5, 2017

Exploring Headline (Point) Type in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how to work with the Type tool to create headline type in this free video (Exploring Headline Type), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

5:16 AM Permalink
January 4, 2017

Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how replace the contents of a Smart Object in this free video (Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

5:39 AM Permalink