Posts tagged "Interface"

May 25, 2016

Hiding and Showing Panels in Lightroom CC

Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) the header of a panel to close all panels (hiding all of their options at once). Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) again to display the contents of all panels.

To display the contents of one panel at a time, Control -click (Mac) / right -click (Win) a panel header (excluding the Navigator and Histogram panel), and select Solo Mode. In Solo Mode, clicking one panel header automatically closes the others. This can be especially useful when working on a laptop or smaller display.

Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the  triangle on the panel header will also enable Solo Mode. The triangle will be a dot pattern while in Solo Mode and solid in the default mode.

Shift -click an additional panel’s header to display the contents of more than one panel while in Solo Mode.

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March 17, 2016

Full Screen Mode in Camera Raw

F toggles Normal / Full Screen modes in Camera Raw.

Note: this is the same as clicking the Full Screen Mode icon on the far right side of the tool bar, next to the Histogram.

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November 30, 2015

The Start and Recent Files Workspaces and Customizable Toolbar in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne walks through the new Start and Recent Files workspaces, updated interface, and customizable Toolbar in the November release of Photoshop CC 2015.

Note: depending on the type of Creative Cloud account you have (for example if you are accessing Creative Cloud via an Enterprise ID, you may or may not see the additional icons and links at the bottom of the Start workspace.

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September 16, 2015

Working with Panels in Photoshop

• To close a panel, right -click (or Ctrl-click on Mac) on the tab and select Close or Close Tab Group.  (If you pull a panel out of its tabbed group and float it, simply click the X to close.)

• Tapping the Tab key toggles panel and tool bar visibility. Shift + Tab temporarily toggles panels visibility. If you have hidden the panels, positioning your cursor at the edge of the monitor will automatically display them (similar to a roll-over effect). To toggle off this feature, choose Preferences > Workspace > Auto-Show Hidden Panels.

• Clicking on panels in “iconic” view will expand them. However, by default they remain open. To automatically collapse the panel when you click anywhere outside of the panel, select Preferences > Workspace > Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels (or, right-click on the panel tab and select Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels).

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September 14, 2015

Repositioning the Tools in Photoshop

The Toolbar can be relocated within the primary screen, “docked” to the panels, or moved to a secondary screen. Click-drag the grabber handle at the top of the tools and drag to reposition. 10_10_GrabberHandlecrop

To dock the Tools with other panels, drag until the solid blue line appears and release the cursor.

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I prefer to move the panels to the left side of my screen and dock them with the tool box, minimizing the space between the tools, panels, the Options bar, and menus. You can also relocate the Options bar – for example, you may want it at the bottom of the monitor or on a secondary monitor.

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September 11, 2015

Quickly Navigating Between Tile and Consolidate to Tabs in Photoshop

When working with Photoshop, I find that  I often need to toggle between viewing one open document and viewing all open documents (tiled in my workspace). To eliminate wasting valuable time looking through menus or trying to find icons, I customize Photoshop’s keyboard shortcuts . To do this, choose Window > Workspace > Keyboard Shortcut & Menus. Under the “Shortcuts for Application Menus”, select Window and and scroll down to “Tile” and “Consolidate to Tabs”. Add shortcuts that make sense to you (I used Shift + Command + T for Tabs ,and Shift + Command + R for Consolidate to Tabs – or, in my mind, “Return to primary image”).

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August 26, 2015

The Activities Center in Lightroom CC

Hovering the cursor above of Lightroom’s Identity Plate displays a white disclosure triangle. Click on the triangle to reveal the Activities Center in Lightroom CC. The Activities Center displays the progress of background operations including Lightroom mobile sync, address lookup (GPS), and indexing for face tagging. You can manage each of these tasks independently.

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• Turn on Sync with Lightroom mobile to sync collections with other Lightroom mobile clients. Only the collections that you have enabled (by clicking the empty well to the left of the collection name) will be synchronized.

•Turn on Address Lookup to have Lightroom look up new GPS coordinates to provide city, state, and country suggestions.

•Turn on Face Detection to have Lightroom index the faces of people in all of your photos. Note: if you enable this and let Lightroom index all of your photos in the catalog, then when you enter People view, it will load faster.

Right-click within Lightroom’s Identity Plate to switch Identity Plates, control which background tasks show in the ID plate area, and edit an Identity Plate.

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In addition, in the Catalog Settings > Metadata, you can set preferences for Address Lookup and Face Detection.

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May 12, 2015

Create and Save Your Own Tool Presets in Photoshop

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Demonstrates how to eliminate repetitive tasks and increase efficiencies in Photoshop by customizing the tools you use the most and saving them as Presets.

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May 8, 2015

Quick Tip – Customizing View Options in Lightroom

In this quick tip, you’ll discover how to customize Lightroom’s view options to display the information you need Grid and Loupe view.

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April 28, 2015

Lightroom CC – Overview of the Lightroom Interface

Take a brief tour through the Lightroom interface to familiarize yourself with Lightroom’s tools and modular workflow.

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March 13, 2015

Custom Panels and Workspaces in Photoshop

I find it to be well worth my time to configure the panels that I am going to be using for a project or specific type of task and then save them as a custom workspace. For example, when I am compositing multiple images together, I use very different sets of panels than I might when working on a document that is text heavy.
Below is a screenshot showing how I arrange my panels for compositing. I dock the panels that I use most often to the Tools (on the left side of the screen). This saves significant time over the course of the day by eliminating the need to travel back and forth across my monitor to select different panel options, tools, and tool options. I have also placed the Properties panel below the Layers panel so that when I add an adjustment layer, my cursor is automatically above the options for that layer.

03_08PanelsThis video (although recorded a while back) demonstrates how to streamline Phostoshop for your specific needs through the customization of Workspaces, Menus, Keyboard shortcuts, Preferences, Tool Presets, Palette options, and the Preset Manager.

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March 12, 2015

Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels in Photoshop

To free up screen real estate, Photoshop offers several options for displaying panels. When viewing the panels as icons, clicking the icon expands the panel to reveal the options. Then, by default, the panel will automatically collapse back into the icon when you click anywhere outside of the panel. If you prefer the panels to remain open, select Preferences > Interface and uncheck the Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels option (or right click on the panel tab and select this option).

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March 11, 2015

Auto-Show Hidden Panels in Photoshop

Tapping the Tab key in Photoshop will hide the tools as well as panels. Tapping again displays them. While they are hidden, positioning the cursor at the edge of the monitor will display the panels so that you can access the tools/options that you need and,  when you move your cursor away, Photoshop will automatically hide them (similar to a roll-over effect). To toggle off this feature, choose Preferences > Interface > Auto-Show Hidden Panels.

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February 11, 2015

Using Lightroom with Two Monitors

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows you how to use 2 monitors to take advantage of Lightroom’s dual monitor solution. Even though I recorded this video a while back, I have been receiving a lot of questions about it lately so I thought I would repost it.

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February 5, 2015

Layer Panel Preview Options in Photoshop

You can customize the preview settings for your Layer thumbnails by selecting Panel Options from the Layers panel fly-out. These settings can make it far easier to see the contents of a layer – especially when viewing on screens that have limited screen area.

• Select a desired Thumbnail Size. Note: if your image is significantly wider than it is high, selecting the smaller thumbnail sizes might display the generic icon for Adjustment layers.

• Under Change Thumbnail Contents, select  “Layer Bounds” to display a preview image of only the area in the layer that contains content.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the  shells as large as possible in the thumbnail.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the shells as large as possible within the thumbnail area.

Select “Entire Document” to display the layer content in relationship to the entire document.

With the Thumbnail content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas size.

With the Thumbnail Content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas.

• Use Default Masks on Fill Layers will automatically add layer masks to Fill layers.

• Expand New Effects  displays the contents of layer styles when applied.

• Add “copy” to Copied Layers and Groups will add the word copy to the layer name when duplicating layers in the Layers panel.

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