Posts tagged "Presets"

April 3, 2018

Lightroom CC April Update – Profiles, Presets, and More!

I’m excited to announce several updates to Lightroom CC starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Lightroom CC, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.
  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Camera Raw is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Lightroom CC.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Lightroom CC won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Camera Raw ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, Red, Blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it. After applying a preset, you can compare two profiles. When long pressing the Option key (Mac) Alt key (Win), the selected profile & hovered-over profile can be previewed/compared.

To change how presets icons are viewed in the Preset Browser, click the three dots and choose to view as a List, Grid, or Large.

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images – profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click it again to remove. 

Quickly access Favorites from the drop down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Profiles and Presets

When saving a preset, the Profile is saved as a part of the preset (just as any other attribute or slider in Lightroom would be). 

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible and accessible across Camera Raw, Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop, and all of the Lightroom desktop products. 

To import presets, click the three dots menu in the presets panel and choose Import Presets. Navigate to a preset, select it, and Lightroom CC will automatically install it.

Lightroom CC for Macintosh and Windows has also added support for network attached storage (NAS) devices as well as a new filter by sync status option, big fixes, and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:55 AM Permalink

Adobe Camera Raw April Update – Raw and Creative Profiles

I’m excited to announce several updates to Camera Raw starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Camera Raw, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.

Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Adobe Standard profile (v2) to all raw files by default. While a few customers changed their default profile (to a camera matching profile for example), the majority of customers, the application of a profile just happened magically. 

  • In this release, profiles have been moved from the Camera Calibration tab to the Basic tab, making them easier to access.

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Camera Raw is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Camera Raw.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Camera Raw won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Camera Raw ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, red, blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it.

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images – profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click again to remove it.

Quickly access Favorites from the Profile drop-down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Including Profiles in a preset

When saving a preset, you can choose to include Treatment & Profile to save the profile as a part of a preset (just as you would any other attribute or setting in Lightroom). 

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible and accessible across Camera Raw, Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop, and all of the Lightroom products. 

In previous versions of Adobe Bridge, choosing Edit > Develop Settings enabled the application of Camera Raw presets to raw and JPEG files. Now, to make presets available in this menu, first mark them as Favorites in Camera Raw. 

The Dehaze slider has moved from the Effects to Basic Panel.

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:30 AM Permalink

Lightroom Classic Desktop April Update – Raw & Creative Profiles, Preset Updates, and More!

I’m excited to announce several updates to Lightroom Classic starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Lightroom Classic, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.

Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Adobe Standard profile (v2) to all raw files by default. While a few customers changed their default profile (to a camera matching profile for example), the majority of customers, the application of a profile just happened magically. 

  • In this release, profiles have been moved from the Camera Calibration tab to the Basic tab, making them easier to access. 

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Lightroom Classic is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Lightroom Classic.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Lightroom won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools. 

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Lightroom ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, red, blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it (as well as preview an accurate rendition of the image in the Histogram Panel).

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images. Profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click the star again to remove it.

Quickly access Favorites from the Profile drop-down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Including Profiles in a preset

When saving a preset, you can choose to include Treatment & Profile to save the profile as a part of a preset (just as you would any other attribute or setting in Lightroom). 

A number of additional features have been updated in Lightroom Classic including:

Preset Enhancements

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible  and accessible across all of the Lightroom products, Camera Raw, and Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop. Existing presets are converted to XMP as part of a catalog upgrade or during the launch process. Note: presets will be renamed in the OS by adding “~” to the start of the filename, but the name of the preset will not change in Lightroom. 

Dehaze

The Dehaze slider has moved from the Effects to Basic Panel and in Copy Settings and Preset creation dialogs, Dehaze is under Basic Tone.

Tone Curve

The Tone Curve Panel has been expanded for more precise adjustments.

Import Grid Performance Improvement on Windows 

When importing images from connected devices, images will appear in the Import Grid in batches, even before all of the images have completed scanning,

Face Tagging 

The Face Tagging engine has been updated to provide better face detection and recognition and includes has two new options:  “Skip over photos that have not been previously indexed” and “Skip over photos with manually confirmed faces”, when selecting Library > Find Faces Again. 

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:20 AM Permalink
September 5, 2017

Setting Custom Develop Defaults in Lightroom Classic

(JK: Updated  12-2017)

To change Lightroom’s default processing setting to apply Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration when importing images, use the following steps:

1) Select a raw file taken with your camera and remove any settings by clicking the Reset button in the lower right of the Develop Module.

2) In the Lens Correction panel, check both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

Note: changes are not limited to Lens Correction. You could, for example, change the default Profile used in the Camera Calibration panel or the amount of Noise Reduction applied in the Details panel – just remember that these settings will be applied to ALL future imported images from this camera.

3) Choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings. Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not Undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when the are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply “Enabling” Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo. Note:  For the small number of images that I don’t want to apply these setting to, I can easily disable (uncheck) the Lens Correction options or create a preset to apply both options in one click. 

Five Additional Tips:

1) If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each model (by following the above steps for each camera model).

2) It is also possible to save different setting for each camera based on serial number and ISO settings (Preferences > Presets). This can be useful when using custom camera profiles and/or customizing Noise Reduction options, for example.

3) If you import 1000 images but will only end up using 10 of them, applying these lens corrections to every file that you import will increase the amount of time it takes to render previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a significant decrease in performance,  you might prefer to create a preset to apply lens corrections, and apply it to only your best images.

4) Option (Mac) | Alt  (Win) toggles the Reset button to Set Default (in the Develop module).

5) Customizing the default settings in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, defines the settings for both products.

5:22 AM Permalink
March 24, 2017

Quickly Apply a Preset using the Painter Tool in Lightroom CC

A very powerful, but seldom used feature of the painter tool is it’s ability to “spray-on” presets in the Library module. Select the Painter tool, set the Paint option to the desired preset, and click on an image to apply it. Note: you can also click -drag across multiple images to add a preset.

5:04 AM Permalink
January 10, 2017

Photographic Toning Techniques in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how easy it is to emulate traditional photographic techniques in this free video (Photographic Toning Techniques in Photoshop CC 2017), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: Photography on Lynda.com.

 

5:05 AM Permalink
December 19, 2016

Opening Documents in Photoshop CC 2017

Discover how to open Documents in Photoshop in this free video (Opening Documents in Photoshop), from Photoshop CC 2017 Essential Training: The Basics on Lynda.com.

5:15 AM Permalink
November 2, 2016

Creating New Documents, Presets, and Templates in Photoshop CC 2017

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly create new documents, save custom presets, as well as download and license templates from Adobe Stock using Photoshop’s New Document workflow.

8:35 AM Permalink
October 24, 2016

Working with Presets in Photoshop CC

Option  (Mac) | Alt (Win) -clicking a preset on a panel (Brush Presets, Swatches, Tool Presets etc.), will delete the preset (the icon swaps to a pair of scissors).

In order to reorder presets, select Edit > Preset > Presets Manager. Under Preset Type, select Brushes, then drag and drop the brush icons into the desired order. Note: this shortcut also works with any of the preset lists in the Preset Manager (Swatches, Gradients, Styles etc.).

2:31 PM Permalink
October 5, 2015

Updates to Lightroom for Web 

Discover how easy it is to upload raw, psd, tiff and jpg images, organize your files, make non-destructive edits to your photographs, and share galleries – all from a web browser using Lightroom web!

Here are a few helpful keyboard shortcuts for navigating Lightroom Web:

When viewing a collection:

Tap “S” to show sharing options

Tap “?” show current keyboard shortcuts

While viewing a single image:

Escape cancels photo selection and returns to grid

Tap 1-5 to add star ratings in a collection

Tap P, U, X to pick, unflag or reject an image in a collection

Spacebar toggles play/pause when viewing video

Left/right arrow navigates back/forward through single image (loupe view)

Tap “I” to open/close Photo Info side panel

Tap “O” to open/close Comment side panel

When editing a photo:

Tap “W to select the White Balance tool

Tap “R” to select the Crop options

Tap “A” to toggle aspect ratio lock

 

6:45 AM Permalink

Updates to Lightroom for Mobile

See how easy it is to organize, edit, and share your photos from anywhere using Lightroom mobile!

New in Lightroom for mobile for iOS, version 2.0:

  • Get from shoot to finish faster with the new Adobe in-app camera on your iPad or iPhone.
  • Control haze with the newly added Dehaze filter.
  • Adjust the hue, saturation, and brightness of colors throughout your image directly with the new Target Adjustment Tool in the Color / B&W adjustment tool.
  • Send a collection of photos over the newly updated Adobe Premiere Clip 2.0 and create amazing video stories, synced to the beat of your music.
  • Get professional quality retouching with Photoshop Fix  which is now seamlessly integrated with Lightroom for mobile with CreativeSync, accessed through the new Edit In option.
  • Lightroom for mobile for iOS can now be used on your phone or tablet without a paid membership, coming soon to Android.

New in Lightroom for mobile for Android, version 1.3 includes:

  • Refine individual colors in your photos with the new Color / B&W adjustment tool.
  • Precisely control the tone of your photo with the new Tone Curve adjustment tool.
  • Bring out the best in your photos with adjustable vignettes.
  • Crop the perfect photo with a redesigned experience that enables you to quickly adjust, align, and auto-straighten.
  • TIFF files are now supported.

You can get Lightroom from the links below:

Read more about Lightroom on the Lightroom Journal here.

6:35 AM Permalink
August 3, 2015

How to Update, Rename and Delete Presets in Lightroom

In this quick tip, learn how to update, rename and delete presets and templates in Lightroom.

5:04 AM Permalink
July 8, 2015

Lightroom CC – Exporting Images

Learn how to quickly export large volumes of images in Lightroom.

5:05 AM Permalink
July 6, 2015

Lightroom CC – Moving Between Lightroom and Photoshop

In this video you’ll discover how to seamlessly move photographs between Lightroom and Photoshop with the exact control that you need.
KW – Lightroom CC, Edit In, Presets, Photoshop

5:50 AM Permalink
June 19, 2015

Lightroom CC – Creating and Saving Presets in the Develop Module

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to create and apply presets to multiple files in Lightroom.

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