Posts tagged "Adobe"

Fixing Adobe Drive after Yosemite upgrade

Like many Mac users, I upgraded my Mavericks machine to Yosemite. While the upgrade should be smooth for most things, Adobe Drive requires an update due to changes in the way that Yosemite manages file systems. Since Drive provides low-level file system services and the hooks to those services changed, the old installation needs to be removed and reinstalled in order for Drive to work properly.

The process is simple. Browse to the Adobe Drive Installation Page and download two things: Adobe Drive and the AdobeDrive5UninstallUtility.dmg. Mount the AdobeDrive5UninstallUtility.dmg, and then follow these steps:

  1. Open Terminal
  2. Type “sudo ” (include the space after sudo)
  3. From the mounted AdobeDrive5UninstallUtility.dmg volume, drag to Terminal so that your command in Terminal looks something like:
    sudo /Volumes/AdobeDrive5-UninstallUtility/AdobeDrive5-UninstallUtility/
  4. Hit enter
  5. Enter your computer’s admin password
  6. You should now see something like the following in the Terminal:
    OSX 10.10.3 release made changes to a few systems calls.
    Manually altering Adobe Drive's Installer Hooks to be compatible with new release...
    Done with file replacements!
  7. Quit Terminal

You can now mount AdobeDrive5_0_3-mul.dmg and install Adobe Drive successfully.

Customers who use Adobe Drive with Adobe Experience Manager may also need to install a package to ensure compatibility with Drive 5.0.3. Specifically, if you are using Drive with AEM 5.6.1, AEM 6.0, AEM 6.0 SP1, AEM 6.0 SP2 then you need to install a patch on your AEM server. The patch is delivered as an AEM Package, and you can install it on your Author instances as necessary. If you use AEM 6.1 or higher, then you do not need to install this package.

One last thing: if you will be using Adobe Bridge CC in the workflow (and who doesn’t?), ensure that you keep Adobe Bridge CC up to date to avoid unexpected crashing issues. If you are in a managed deployment environment, then contact your system administrator to ensure that you have the latest Adobe Bridge CC installed.

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New Layer Override behavior in InDesign a boon to fashion and product design

Have you ever placed an Illustrator file into InDesign and then used the Layer Overrides capability to turn layers on and off for that file? Have you ever placed the same Illustrator file several times with different Layer Overrides on? If you have, then you likely work in apparel or footwear design and use AI and ID in your workflows. You have also likely cursed out loud when you made a change to the Illustrator file’s layers, only to have to reset the Layer Overrides for each of those placed AI files in InDesign. If this sounds like you, then I have some good news.

The InDesign CC 2015.1 release includes an innocuous little switch that will change your life. Really.

Here’s the scoop. There is a new checkbox in the Preferences>File Handling that lets you change how InDesign handles Layer Overrides for placed AI and InDesign files. Enable the “Hide New Layers When Updating and Relinking” option to use the new behavior.

New option in Preferences>File Handling

Enable this option to prevent new layers in AI files from appearing in ID when you update the link

After you enable this option, you will no longer need to adjust the Layer Overrides on placed AI and InDesign files when you add new layers to the placed graphic. Yes, that’s right. Let’s say that you are working on colorways for a new shirt, and you typically do this by adding new layers to your base CAD artwork in AI. You can now place that AI file into an InDesign file many times and set layer overrides to expose the different colorways. When you add new layers to the AI file and update the link in InDesign, the new layers will no longer appear in InDesign. If you delete layers in the AI file, then those layers will disappear in InDesign if those deleted layers are enabled.

Can I get an “hallelujah!” from all of the folks who deal with the drudgery of updating Layer Overrides over and over as the colorways change over time?

Now, you may be asking yourself what happens with Photoshop. In the InDesign CC 2015.1 release, there is no difference with the way that Photoshop Layer Overrides work, so you will still need to go adjust the linked graphics in InDesign if you make or delete layers in your Photoshop files. However, with the constant pace of innovation here at Adobe, it is very likely that InDesign will enable the new behavior for placed Photoshop files in a later release. If you see an InDesign engineer on the street, give them a knowing nod and a thumbs up. This little feature is a big one indeed.

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FIRST Robotics uses DPS for its Game Manuals

One of the great benefits of working at Adobe is that Adobe believes strongly in community involvement and volunteering. Every Adobe employee is encouraged to use their skills and passions outside of their jobs as volunteers and board members for nonprofits and other community organizations. I take this to heart as a volunteer with FIRST Robotics.

James working as a Game Announcer at the Granite State District FRC event in Nashua, NH, 2015

James working as a Game Announcer at the Granite State District FRC event, 2015

FIRST Robotics offers programs for elementary, middle school and high school students around the world. These programs expose students to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) through sport-like competition. Students receive a challenge at the beginning of each competition season and then build robots to address the challenge. Depending on the age of the participants, the challenge may be to solve an important problem such as water quality or delivery of affordable health care, or it might be to play a game that requires careful planning of both robot design and gamely strategy.

The elementary school program is called Junior FIRST Lego League (Jr.FLL). In Jr.FLL, students prepare a presentation to address the challenge. As the students get older, the programs become competitive and the teams must design, build and program a robot to address the challenge.

The middle school program is called FIRST Lego League (FLL). In FLL, the robots are made of Legos and use Lego NXT or EV3 controllers. The robots always operate autonomously, and there is only one robot on each side of the playing field at a time. The robots perform tasks related to the challenge, but do not generally compete directly with another robot.

In high school, teams compete alongside other teams called Alliances to try and outscore other alliances. There are two high school programs: FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) and FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC). In FTC and FRC, the robots operate autonomously for the first few seconds of the match, and then the students drive the robots for the remainder. There is usually a period at the end of the match, known as the “endgame,” where the rules change or an additional challenge becomes available. There is not always an endgame.

FTC uses Lego NXT robot controllers on larger robot frames, but they are transitioning to Android controllers for the next season. FTC matches consist of two robots per alliance and two alliances on the field at a time. FRC uses a National Instruments roboRIO controller and frames up to 120 lbs. FRC matches consist of three robots per alliance and two alliances on the field at a time. There is a ton of YouTube video out there; just search for FLL, FTC or FRC. I volunteer with FRC as a play-by-play announcer at competitions and occasionally as an event judge.

The FIRST App home screen on an iPad

The FIRST app features a home screen with sections for each program.

Common to all FIRST programs is documentation. Each program has a range of program-specific documentation, including but not limited to:

  • Rules for each competitive season
  • Coach and mentor guidelines
  • Team notifications
  • Curriculum help
  • Change logs for all of the aforementioned documentation

Managing all of this documentation is a challenge, as the documentation changes regularly with real consequences for teams. For instance, it is common early in the competition season for game rules to change that might impact robot design. Also, teams are encouraged to ask questions about the rules, and those questions and answers are often summarized in the game documentation. Teams need to be informed in a timely manner so that they don’t proceed with designs that might not align with the game rules.

Another challenge is timing. Game rules are announced to the world at specific times on specific days. This is done through global simulcast so that no team has an advantage over another team when it comes to the game rules. Traditionally, documentation has been provided via password-protected PDFs on the FIRST web site. At the end of the simulcast, the password would be revealed and the teams could begin to read.

When we started talking about DPS with FIRST, these two challenges were topmost in our minds, and when I say “our,” I mean the Adobe team. I can’t speak for what was topmost in FIRST’s collective mind. We all believed that DPS could solve the update problem as well as the timed release of content problem very well, so we put it to the test in January of 2015 with the reveal of the 2015 FRC Game, Recycle Rush.

You can download the FIRST app from iTunes or from Google Play. You can also read the FRC Admin Manual, Game Manual, Team Updates in the DPS web viewer.

For FRC Kickoff, I went to a local college with most of the teams from Maine to watch the simulcast together. Many of the mentors and students had their mobile devices, and many had the FIRST app on their device ahead of time. As the game was revealed and as the password for the PDF was shown, the game manual for Recycle Rush appeared in the FIRST Game Manual app right on schedule. One of the mentors sitting next to me watched this happen. He looked at me and asked if he needed a password. I smiled and asked him to open the manual and find out. He tapped on the manual and began to read. Smiling, he looked up and said, “Wow. That was cool!”

A text push notice about a Game update.

The next test came a week later when the first updates were to be published. The manuals are made in InDesign, so the team at FIRST was able to make the adjustments and publish those changes from InDesign. Once published, teams needed to know that the changes were available, so FIRST used the built-in DPS push notification service. I and my team all received the notices on our iPads and our iPhones, and swiping or tapping the notice took us right to the updated content.

As we moved through the competition season, I watched how teams used the manuals. Many teams had it on their phones as well as their tablets, as they frequently returned to the manual to confirm design choices. Later, as the season progressed, they were looking carefully at the conditions which might lead to penalties. Even through the District Championship event, with teams having competed in two or more precursor events, teams still made frequent use of the manuals.

The design of the manual is as important as the content, and FIRST produced a clean, readable, and highly functional tool to help teams play the game and ultimately to be better competitors. Kudos to the FIRST documentation team, who produce manuals for all of the FIRST games.

I’m headed to the FIRST Championships in St. Louis, Missouri this week to volunteer some more and to see all of the FIRST programs draw to a close for the 2014-2015 season. It has been a pleasure and a delight to help bring the manuals on DPS to fruition and then to see the positive reaction and real world usage of the tool. I’m looking forward to helping the manuals evolve as the 2015-2016 season gets underway.


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Creative Workflow Specialist seeking data on, well, creative workflows!

I recently became a Creative Workflow Specialist here at Adobe. In this role, I spend a lot of time working with customers, helping them understand how Adobe’s diverse technologies knit together as an end-to-end content development to syndication to monetization to measurement platform. I also spend time learning about how customers have developed their own workflows using our tools, and that is the subject of this post.

In almost every meeting I attend, Bridge appears as a critical part of the workflow. This was the intent of Bridge when it was released back in the day, but it amazes me at how differently people use the same tool. Some use it simply as a file browser. Others use it for managing metadata on assets. Still more use it to interface with their Digital Asset Management (DAM) system. I have even encountered customers who built custom plugins for Bridge to allow users to interface directly with the company’s project management and product lifecycle management solutions. Wow!

I want to thank everyone who responded to the survey that I had posted here earlier in the year. We have completed our information gathering and have presented our findings in another blog post. To all of you who responded (and there were a LOT of you who responded), thanks for your insights, and keep on being creative!

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Come learn how to use AEM for DPS Libraries and Entitlement at Adobe Summit

I’ll be leading a lab at Adobe Summit this year that helps to tighten the integration between Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) and Adobe Experience Manager (AEM). AEM has had the ability to manage and publish content to DPS for a couple of years now, and customers are having great success using AEM as a templated design surface on which to make DPS folios.

Customers who want to leverage DPS Entitlement have had to build or buy a solution that usually but not always runs on a Apache with PHP/MySQL. The Adobe DPS Developer portal has several examples, including a great starter kit. Customers have been asking, though, how to use the user management built in to AEM to manage entitlement.

In addition, DPS apps often have custom Libraries and Storefronts, which are basically HTML portals that interact with the DPS app and the DPS Services to provide a customized experience in the app. Customers also will build or buy custom Library/Storefront solutions based on the DPS Library APIs.

My lab at Summit, presented with my good friend Herman Lee of Ensemble Systems, shows how to use AEM to both manage DPS entitlement and to create and manage custom Library/Storefront code. AEM is an excellent design surface for this, with its flexible component architecture and its ability to integrate with Enterprise Identity management solutions. The session is “L709 – Implement an Adobe Digital Publishing Suite storefront in Experience Manager” and it takes place on Tuesday Afternoon at 1:30 to 3:30 Utah time. If you’re going to Summit, sign up today for my lab and learn how to get even more value out of your AEM and DPS investments. You’ll need to login to the Summit site in order to register.

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