June 17, 2010

Flash Player & Photoshop.com app updated for Android

  • Flash Player 10.1 Public Beta 3 for Android is now live on Google’s Android Market for Nexus One phones running Android 2.2. Flash Player was already the #1 free download on the Android store, and people seem to be digging the new release (“Awesome.” “Epic.” “Live soccer on my phone = win.”).
  • An Adobe installer–the Flash Player installer at that–has actually drawn praise from irascible Mac IT guy John C. Welch. (I will now check for the sun becoming as black as sackcloth, etc.)
  • Unrelated to Flash, a new release of the Photoshop.com Mobile app for Android is available. The new release adds support for uploading to Facebook and Twitter via TwitPic, along with one-touch borders (soft edges, vignettes, rounded corners) and more.
8:40 PM | Permalink | Comments [7]

NYC photowalk with Adobe PMs next Saturday

On June 26th, Lightroom and Photoshop product managers Tom Hogarty and Bryan O’Neil Hughes will be leading a morning photo walk around New York’s Madison Square Park and Flatiron district. Meet up at Foto Care 41 West 22nd (between 5th & 6th Aves.) at 10am sharp. The walk is scheduled to last until 2pm and includes a free lunch and software tips/demos. Feel free to bring your disc camera & crampons whatever camera you’d like & comfortable shoes.

Space is limited to 50 participants, so please RSVP via the event page.

Other NY/next week-related reminders:

  • On Friday the 25th from 4:30-7:30 pm, Scott Kelby & crew will be joining Adobe folks for a free Photoshop CS5 Summit.
  • Tom and Bryan will be presenting LR3 and PS CS5 at Fotocare on the 28th and 29th; see details.
4:36 PM | Permalink | Comments [2]

From great heights: Cool weather balloon + camera project

Colin Rich used a homemade weather balloon to carry cameras to an altitude of 125,000 feet:

According to PetaPixel,

After purchasing two Canon compact cameras on eBay, Rich programmed them to take 3 photos every 3 minutes, and shoot a minute of video every fourth minute. The cameras were then insulated in styrofoam, and sent up to 125,000 feet before the balloon burst. With the help of a parachute, the cameras descended for 35 minutes and landed about 15-20 miles away.

It’s a great time to be alive. [Via]

9:16 AM | Permalink | Comments [6]
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