September 05, 2012

Photoshop Touch goes high res: Now supports big images, Retina

Addressing the biggest requests from customers, a free update for Photoshop Touch is now available for iPad and Android tablets:

 

  • Retina Display Support: See your images like never before with the Retina display on the new iPad.
  • Higher resolution capabilities: Work on high-resolution images while maintaining the highest image quality. Supports images up to 12 megapixels. 
  • Two new languages: Russian and Brazilian Portuguese. 
  • Two new Effects: Shred and Colorize 
  • Smoother animation and scrolling in the organizer, tutorial browser, and file picker 
  • New gesture to toggle 100% view and fit screen (three-finger tap) 
  • New pixel nudging mode for precise movements 
  • Support for Apple Photo Stream 
  • Various bug fixes

 

What do you think? Where should we go from here?

 

10:25 AM | Permalink | Comments [5]

Introducing Adobe Anywhere: Badass video collaboration

I’m delighted that Adobe has officially unveiled Adobe Anywhere, our collaborative workflow platform for video. You can use After Effects, Premiere Pro, and Prelude to manipulate assets on a server, letting people team up across locations, devices, and networks.

Seeing is believing: I’ve gotten to sit next to PM Michael Coleman as he cruises through high-res video on his MacBook Air, and you’d swear he was tethered to a brawny machine under the desk–not talking via WiFi to a server hundreds of miles away. Here’s a quick demo:

I’m especially proud as this is the project that the other leading Adobe Nack, my wife Margot, has been working on for quite some time. Congrats to the whole team!

9:38 AM | Permalink | Comments [5]

Insane in the literal membrane

The crazy nerds at Backyard Brains have created “the world’s first cephalo-iPod,” pumping Cypress Hill through the body of an unsuspecting squid:

An iPod plays music by converting digital music to a small current that it sends to tiny magnets in the earbuds. The magnets are connected to cones that vibrate and produce sound.

Since this is the same electrical current that neurons use to communicate, we cut off the ear buds and instead placed the wire into the fin nerve. When the iPod sends bass frequencies (<100Hz) the axons in the nerves have enough charge to fire an action potential. This will in turn cause the muscles in the chromatophores to contract.

[Via]

8:02 AM | Permalink | No Comments
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