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Support for Adobe Reader 8 and Adobe Acrobat 8 has ended. As a policy, Adobe provides five years of product support, starting from the general availability date of Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat. In line with this policy, support for Adobe Reader 8.x and Adobe Acrobat 8.x will end on November 3 2011.

End of Support means that Adobe no longer provides technical support or distributes runtimes. This policy affects product and security updates for all derivatives of a product or product version (localized versions, minor upgrades, operating systems, dot and double-dot releases, and connector products.)

You can read the whole technote here or I can save you the trouble and summarize. Upgrade… as quickly as possible.

There are three key, IT related, reasons to upgrade to Acrobat X or Reader X; end-of-support is just the first. The other two are the Protected View/Mode or “Sandboxing” and support for SCCM deployment and SCUP maintenance. You can read more about these technologies at the related articles below.

Our First SCUP Catalog for Acrobat and Reader X is Here
Introducing Adobe Reader Protected Mode

You’ll also find that version 10 loads faster, displays a progress bar when downloading PDF files in the browser and generally has a much cleaner appearance especially in the browser. If you’ve been using Acrobat or Reader 8, you’re going to love Acrobat and Reader X.

Adobe Reader 8 and Adobe Acrobat 8 End of Support

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Just yesterday, I posted on the need to keep your software up to date to avoid security problems and vulnerabilities. Today, a new technote came out reminding you that support for Adobe Reader 8.x and Adobe Acrobat 8.x will ends very soon.

Adobe provides five years of product support, starting from the general availability date of Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat. In line with this policy, support for Adobe Reader 8.x and Adobe Acrobat 8.x will end on November 3 2011.

End of Support means that Adobe no longer provides technical support or distributes runtimes. This policy affects product and security updates for all derivatives of a product or product version (localized versions, minor upgrades, operating systems, dot and double-dot releases, and connector products.)

You can read the whole technote here or I can save you the trouble and summarize. Upgrade… as quickly as possible.

There are three key, IT related, reasons to upgrade to Acrobat X or Reader X; end-of-support is just the first. The other two are the Protected View/Mode or “Sandboxing” and support for SCCM deployment and SCUP maintenance. You can read more about these technologies at the related articles below.

Our First SCUP Catalog for Acrobat and Reader X is Here
Introducing Adobe Reader Protected Mode

Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.1.1), 9.4.6 and 8.3.1

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In case you missed it last week, we announced the availability of Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.1.1), 9.4.6 and 8.3.1.

Steve Gottwals, Group Product Manager for Adobe Reader, wrote the following about the releases.

EchoSign for Adobe Reader
With Adobe Reader X (10.1.1), you can now click on the EchoSign link directly in Reader and you’ll be taken straight to the EchoSign page where you can start signing, sending and tracking your PDF documents. The entire signature process from the request for signature to the distribution and execution of the form or agreement is done online. The EchoSign signature service provides a secure subscription-based service to individuals, SMBs and enterprise customers. It enables real-time visibility into the signature process and automatically storing and managing all signed documents. We expect it will make electronic signatures the common way for people to sign documents.

Adobe Reader X(10.1.1) UI Enhancement
As we add new services, like EchoSign mentioned above, you will notice that the Reader UI has enhanced tools panes as well. Instead of “Comment” and “Share”, we have now re-organized them to hold “Tools” and “Comments”. These enhancements not only allow for better expansion in the future, they also provide a better user experience when accessing Reader’s advanced capabilities as tested with our end-users.

Adobe Reader and Acrobat Version 8 End of Support
As a reminder to the previous blog post: Adobe Reader and Acrobat Version 8 End of Support, Adobe provides five years of product support from the general availability date of Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat (Windows and Macintosh – Note: Adobe only supports the most recent major version of Adobe Reader for Linux Version 9.x). In line with that policy, support for Adobe Reader 8.x and Adobe Acrobat 8.x will end on November 3, 2011.

For more information regarding the security details in these releases, please see Security Bulletin APSB11-24. For detailed Release Notes, please see the Release Notes Library.

This Isn’t Working

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I hear “This isn’t working” from frustrated customers on a fairly regular basis. Most of the time it’s because a particular PDF file isn’t behaving the way that they expect it to. So, with the recent release of the “Compatibility Advisory Regarding Adobe Reader plug-in and Acrobat plug-in with Safari 5.1“, I thought I’d address a few broader compatibility issues that may arise when working with PDF files.


But first… Yes – I’m biased – I work for Adobe. So I’ll try to stick to just the facts in this article and let everyone come to their own conclusions. I’m also not going to cover the obvious compatibility issues that are inherent with PDF Portfolios, Multimedia and other Flash dependent objects in PDF files, but will, instead, limit my discussion to the core of PDF that is in use my most people out there and not the cutting edge stuff that I talk about in my developer blog.

There are three scenarios that are the root cause of most issues around use of PDF files and I’ll address each separately but they can… and do… occur in combination with each other.

This Isn’t Working