PremierePro

Adobe weblog about Premiere Pro and the success of Premiere Pro customers worldwide

Color Science, Explained (Part 2)

In a previous post, we interviewed Lars Borg, Principal Color Scientist at Adobe, about the intriguing field of color science. In this post, Lars shares a few things that everyone working in video ought to know about color science.

We learned from Lars that “color” is actually an interplay of available light, colors, and the context in which we see them – all of which makes color subjective to a lot of different variables. We wanted to know, with such a deep topic, what ground rules can filmmakers and video enthusiasts derive from color science when it comes to basic color correction and color grading?

Looks are essential in cinematic storytelling

In the past, the film stock played an integral role in creating the “look” or character of a film. In the transition from film-based movie making to digital video, our relationship to color has shifted too. “The concept of the look is integral to film-based photography. You’d pick your film stock, say Fuji Velvia or Kodachrome, because the resulting look was pleasing to you. Some of the ‘look’ stems from the fact that the film’s spectral sensitivities don’t match the eye’s.” For example, some film stocks are overly sensitive to red, resulting in richer skin tones. Now, digital systems can emulate the look of film stocks.

FilmLook
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Color Science, Explained (Part 1)

 

The theme of the 2015 release of Creative Cloud pro video tools is “Creativity just got a lot more colorful.” With color being such a hot topic at Adobe and beyond, we interviewed Lars Borg, Adobe’s resident color expert, to tell us more about color science and what filmmakers and video enthusiasts can take away from such a deep field.

Stay tuned for Part 2, where we’re share key color science takeaways for working with video.

Colors are a lot more than wavelengths on a spectrum. There’s a whole scientific field dedicated to the understanding of color, light, and ultimately, human perception: “Color science is based on how the eye reacts to color and light stimuli. It also includes how we ‘fool the eye’ – like that dress – based on what we are expecting to see, as well as how the eye adapts to different conditions, such as sunlight versus dark night,” says Lars Borg, Principal Color Scientist at Adobe. Color science is a cross-disciplinary field involving chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, and psychology. It plays a key role in the design and production of most man-made materials—everything from textiles to digital imaging – as well as in defining properties of natural materials.

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Morph Cut – Tips & Tricks for Best Results

Morph cut is a very powerful new Video Transition in Premiere Pro CC 2015. It enables users to create polished interviews by smoothing out distracting jump cuts without cross-dissolves or cut away footage. To get the most out of this new and exciting feature, here are some best practice tips as well as some advice on what to expect when using Morph Cut in the real world.

Similar to Adobe Photoshop’s Content-Aware Fill feature, users will need to be selective and understand when Morph Cut may or may not work in an ideal way. There are three main requirements to get it to work properly

  1. A “talking head” interview shot with a single subject
  2. A fixed shot (minimal camera movement may be OK)
  3. A static background (includes avoiding subtle lighting changes)
MorphCut_Waveform

Here is a good example of ideal framing for Morph Cut – Note that the head is large in the frame but not cropped, it’s evenly lit, and the hands are out of frame. Also notice that we’ve used the waveform to help show where there is a natural pause in speech and that the transition has been made asymmetrical so that it fits quite well into the speech gap.

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Premiere Pro CC 2015

Today we are extremely excited to be releasing the newest version of Premiere Pro CC, which is accompanied by all-new versions of our creative video and audio desktop apps, including Prelude, After Effects, SpeedGrade, Adobe Media Encoder, and Audition, alongside a powerful new mobile application for iOS, Adobe Hue, an update to Premiere Clip and the first public preview of Adobe Character Animator (installed as part of After Effects). Learn more about this entire release here.

 

Creative Cloud members and trial users will be able to download and install these applications today using the Creative Cloud desktop application, or online from http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html.

 

PLEASE NOTE: that the 2015 Creative Cloud releases are designed to remove previous versions of the CC apps. More information on this and how to adjust this default behavior can be found here.

 

The 2015 release of Premiere Pro CC contains all of the amazing features we previewed at NAB 2015 in April, including the new Color workspace featuring the Lumetri Color Panel and powerful new real-time scopes, Morph Cut, an improved Premiere Clip workflow, Time Tuner, task oriented Workspaces, expanded format support, audio workflow enhancements, caption burn-in, editing refinements, and improved support for Windows touch devices. Full information on these features can be found here.

 

The inclusion of Creative Cloud Libraries in Hue, Premiere Clip, Premiere Pro, and After Effects, powered by Adobe CreativeSync, make creative assets like Looks and graphics automatically available across a user’s applications, as well as empowering collaborative workflows between team members via shared Libraries. Jump start your creative projects by quickly searching over 35 million quality images and graphics in the new Adobe Stock image service. Subscribe to an Adobe Stock stand-alone plan, or get the best value when you buy it as part of your Creative Cloud subscription.

 

In addition to the significant number of new and enhanced features, this release also includes hundreds of bug fixes and stability improvements, including greatly improved Mercury Transmit performance. A full list of fixed bugs can be found here.

 

Alongside the key features described above and in the original blog post, there are multiple other improvements, a full list of which appears below.

 

  • New native formats are supported: JPEG 2000 MXF Op1a, Panasonic 4K 444, Canon XF-AVC XC10, DNxHD with compressed alpha, and Dolby 5.1 export
  • Looks applied in Premiere Clip now pass through to Premiere Pro (requires latest version of Premiere Clip)
  • A composite view is shown in the 2-up display in the Program Monitor when drag-trimming an edit point in the timeline
  • A Video Mixdown option is available when exporting AAF
  • The anchor point can be dragged in Direct Manipulation
  • Consolidate and Transcode now supports handle durations of up to 999 frames
  • Fielded footage can be monitored over HDMI
  • Trim and Nudge can use the same keyboard shortcut
  • ProRes media performance has been improved by up to 2x on Mac
  • A ‘Hide’ checkbox has been added to the Project Panel, and a ‘View Hidden’ option to the contextual menu in the Project Panel, so that users can have items in sequences which are not visible in the Project Panel by default
  • A ‘Preserve Alpha’ checkbox has been added to Consolidate and Transcode
  • Support for RED DEB, REDcolor4 and DRAGONcolor2 has been added
  • Up and down cursor arrows can be used to adjust numerical parameters
  • The maximum sequence size is now 16K
  • The Project Panel can be sorted by XMP metadata
  • Input only devices can be used on the Mac without needing to create an aggregate device
  • Source Settings for RAW formats now appear as intrinsic Master Clip Effects, and Source Settings can be applied to multiple selected clips in the Project Panel
  • Master Clip Effects can be removed from the Project Panel
  • 4-point editing has been improved by enabling Ignore Source Out
  • Clip Markers are still displayed in the timeline for tracks set to minimum height
  • In loop playback Trim mode in the program monitor, the I and O buttons can be used to adjust the position of the edit point on the fly
  • Keyboard shortcuts can be assigned to Play Audio In to Out and Play Video In to Out
  • A Revert Trim Session button can be added to the Program Monitor to enable an edit point to be returned to its original position before Trim Mode was entered
  • The transition UI has been restored in the Effects Control Panel
  • An eyedropper tool is available in the Color Matte dialog
  • Improved support for discontinuous timecode in Multicam workflows
  • Subsequences can be created from parts of a sequence

Adobe Media Encoder CC 2015

Today we are extremely excited to be releasing the newest version of Media Encoder CC, which is accompanied by all-new versions of our creative video and audio desktop apps.

 

Creative Cloud members and trial users will be able to download and install these applications from today using the Creative Cloud desktop application, or online from http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html. Please note that the 2015 Creative Cloud releases are designed to remove previous versions of the CC apps. More information on this and how to adjust this default behavior can be found here.

 

The 2015 release of Media Encoder CC contains all of the amazing features we previewed at NAB in April, including Time Tuner, expanded format support including JPEG 2000, Dolby Digital multichannel support, QuickTime audio channelization, new UI appearance preferences, and improvements to Creative Cloud publishing. Full information on these features can be found here.

 

In addition to the significant number of new and enhanced features, this release also includes many bug fixes and stability improvements. A full list of fixed bugs will be posted to this blog in the coming days.

 

Alongside the key features described above, there are severa; other improvements, a full list of which appears below.

 

  • Rewrap compatible video streams in to a QuickTime wrapper easily with the new QuickTime rewrap preset
  • An option to set a custom start timecode for your export preset
  • Better logic for detecting when you’ve selected an image sequence for import

Creatives all over the world are producing amazing work with Premiere Pro -

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Ask a Video Pro Webinars

What’s Next for Adobe Pro Video Tools - webcast presented by Jason Levine from NAB Show 2015

Thursday, April 16th | 11amPT
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Recent Sessions

Managing Video Formats with Adobe Media Encoder - presented by Joost van der Hoeven
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The Filmmaking Workflow with Premiere Pro & Creative Cloud - presented by Christine Steele
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Secrets to Running a Great Wedding Video Business - presented by Summeyah & Jawad Mir
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Blurring the Line Between Indie & Hollywood - a panel discussion featuring Rob Legato, Dave Ginsberg, Kyle Alvarez & Meagan Keane at Sundance Film Festival 2015.
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After Effects for (almost!) Everyone - presented by Joost van der Hoeven.
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Bring Color Grading to Your Editorial Workflow - presented by Patrick Palmer.
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LOG and RAW Workflow & Adobe Tools presented by Robbie Carman
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Boost Your Career with a Killer Reel presented by Rod Harlan
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