Archive for February, 2016

Adobe Report: TV Connected Devices Surpass iOS Share of TV Everywhere Authentications

Every quarter, we report on highlights from the Adobe Digital Index’s Digital Video Benchmark Report. The latest Q4 2015 report released today also highlights trends around TV Everywhere adoption throughout 2015. Two trends were especially consistent. First, TV Everywhere continued to grow. Second, so did home-based viewing from TV connected devices like Apple TV and Roku.

TV Everywhere reached an all-time high of 17.4% of pay-TV subscribers in Q4 2015

By the end of 2015, TV Everywhere adoption was up 36% year-over-year (YoY) to reach 17.4% of pay-TV subscribers.

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TV connected devices drove 21% of TV Everywhere authentications in Q4 2015

Authentications on TV connected devices reached 21% share in Q4 2015, up 5 percentage points from 16% in Q4 2014. The gain in share for authentications on TV connected devices were offset by a loss in share for authentications on iOS devices. However, iOS still has the highest share of authentications at 36%.

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Get more TV Everywhere insights in the full report

To explore more TV Everywhere trends, check out Adobe Digital Index’s 2015 Digital Video Benchmark Report. As one of the most comprehensive reports of its kind, the report examined 134 billion total online video starts, 3.6 billion TV Everywhere authentications and 300+ different sites and apps acting as TV Everywhere access points. Aside from the key trends highlighted here, it covers a doubling of authenticated video viewing, the YoY growth in authenticated video viewing by genre, and the growth in viewing frequency by device type. It also shares the specific device types that drove the most authentications in Q4 2015, including how Apple TV’s share of TV Everywhere authentications doubled YoY, while iOS share dipped 18% YoY.

Major Dynamic Ad Insertion Advancements in MPEG-DASH

Today at Mobile World Congress, we announced how recent enhancements to Adobe Primetime will enable dynamic ad insertion (DAI) in MPEG-DASH streams using the same workflows and business rules that they’ve used to insert ads into HLS streams. The end result is a high-quality, stitched stream of ads and content that can reach viewers across the wide range of devices and browsers that support MPEG-DASH — including all HTML5-compliant browsers.

For consumers, this means they can access more high-quality content (including HD and 4K) with lower data and bandwidth usage, and media companies can deliver it with lower content delivery network (CDN) costs. Adobe Primetime is the only DAI technology available in both client- and server-side configurations, allowing for maximum reach and deployment flexibility.

We’ve made DAI in MPEG-DASH almost exactly the same as using HLS, with some significant advancements. Here’s a summary of Adobe Primetime’s use of MPEG-DASH and HLS for ad insertion:

  • Creative Repackaging Service Our creative repackaging works for MPEG-DASH just like it works for HLS. It takes all the same input formats and transcodes them to MPEG-DASH for smooth transitions between content and ads.
    • Compliance with Ad Insertion Rules – Adobe Primetime follows the same rules that a customer has for inserting ads into MPEG-DASH streams as it does for inserting ads into HLS streams. This includes honoring trick play settings, seek settings, and ad forgiveness settings, which specify the timeframes around which viewers should not be exposed to ads.
  • Response to Ad Cues – MPEG-DASH has a unique method of specifying ad cues, which Adobe Primetime supports. The method is different from HLS because it requires parsing out custom ad cues from a manifest. Adobe Primetime manages that complexity.

Getting started with DAI in MPEG-DASH streams

Adobe Primetime is excited to help customers effectively monetize their programming by combining the power of the open MPEG-DASH standard with Adobe Primetime’s advanced ad insertion capabilities. For example, M6 (the largest broadcaster in France), is leveraging these capabilities to help stream this summer’s UEFA European Football Championship across screens. Please contact the Adobe Primetime team to get started with DAI into MPEG-DASH streams.

Adobe Primetime & HTML5 for OTT Television and Film

As we announced at IBC this past September, Adobe Primetime supports the deployment of live, linear and on-demand OTT experiences to HTML5 environments across screens. Our TVSDK for HTML5 applies Adobe’s expertise in video solutions to the open HTML5 standard. It extends reach and monetization of premium video experiences across the mobile web, including to mobile web browsers on iOS and Android devices. This enables engaging video experiences on mobile devices without forcing viewers into apps. In turn, this allows mobile publishers to deliver more of what people want on the mobile web and increase the amount of time viewers spend on their mobile websites. TVSDK for HTML5 also works with HTML5-compliant desktop browsers and over-the-top (OTT) devices.

There are several advantages to leveraging Adobe’s support for HTML5. First, TVSDK for HTML5 supports all the same streamlined workflows that are part of Adobe Primetime. Second, Adobe Primetime customers still get TVSDK 2.0, with our latest enhancements to the TVSDK, as a fallback solution where HTML5 is not supported and TVSDK 2.0 is supported.

By leveraging TVSDK 2.0 and TVSDK for HTML5, Adobe Primetime customers can achieve the greatest possible reach across screens available anywhere.

Delivering OTT TV and Film Experiences with TVSDK for HTML5

TVSDK for HTML5 controls access to premium video content by invoking the digital rights management (DRM) of the browser or platform that the consumer is using. For Mozilla Firefox version 38 and up, this means invoking the Adobe Primetime Content Decryption Module (CDM), which is an implementation of the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) specification, and can be used in conjunction with the Media Source Extensions (MSE) specification. For other browsers and platforms, TVSDK for HTML5 invokes whichever CDM is available to playback encrypted media, whether that is Google’s Widevine in Chrome, Microsoft PlayReady in Internet Explorer or Edge, or Apple’s FairPlay Streaming in Safari.

Browser support for the playback of protected video content in an HTML5 environment is at an all time high. According to December 2015 data from netmarketshare.com, 68% of monthly active desktop browsers already support HTML5 through EME and MSE implementations. However, this still means that 32% of desktop browsers can’t play protected video content in an HTML5 environment. So, it’s crucial to have the desktop fallback solution that’s provided by TVSDK 2.0.

Deploying to more screens in the future

In the future, HTML5 through EME and MSE will open up new possibilities for operators and programmers to get on even more screens. It provides a generic specification for browser manufacturers to build APIs that allow premium video experiences to be delivered in their browsers. Most consumer electronics manufacturers, traditional browser manufacturers, and content creators are now working towards HTML5 through EME and MSE as a standard means of delivery. For instance, both Chromecast and late model Samsung TVs use HTML5 through EME and MSE. Stay tuned as Adobe Primetime certifies these devices and others like them.