Adobe Primetime & HTML5 for OTT Television and Film

As we announced at IBC this past September, Adobe Primetime supports the deployment of live, linear and on‐demand OTT experiences to HTML5 environments across screens. Our TVSDK for HTML5 applies Adobe’s expertise in video solutions to the open HTML5 standard. It extends reach and monetization of premium video experiences across the mobile web, including to mobile web browsers on iOS and Android devices. This enables engaging video experiences on mobile devices without forcing viewers into apps. In turn, this allows mobile publishers to deliver more of what people want on the mobile web and increase the amount of time viewers spend on their mobile websites. TVSDK for HTML5 also works with HTML5‐compliant desktop browsers and over‐the‐top (OTT) devices.

There are several advantages to leveraging Adobe’s support for HTML5. First, TVSDK for HTML5 supports all the same streamlined workflows that are part of Adobe Primetime. Second, Adobe Primetime customers still get TVSDK 2.0, with our latest enhancements to the TVSDK, as a fallback solution where HTML5 is not supported and TVSDK 2.0 is supported.

By leveraging TVSDK 2.0 and TVSDK for HTML5, Adobe Primetime customers can achieve the greatest possible reach across screens available anywhere.

Delivering OTT TV and Film Experiences with TVSDK for HTML5

TVSDK for HTML5 controls access to premium video content by invoking the digital rights management (DRM) of the browser or platform that the consumer is using. For Mozilla Firefox version 38 and up, this means invoking the Adobe Primetime Content Decryption Module (CDM), which is an implementation of the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) specification, and can be used in conjunction with the Media Source Extensions (MSE) specification. For other browsers and platforms, TVSDK for HTML5 invokes whichever CDM is available to playback encrypted media, whether that is Google’s Widevine in Chrome, Microsoft PlayReady in Internet Explorer or Edge, or Apple’s FairPlay Streaming in Safari.

Browser support for the playback of protected video content in an HTML5 environment is at an all time high. According to December 2015 data from netmarketshare.com, 68% of monthly active desktop browsers already support HTML5 through EME and MSE implementations. However, this still means that 32% of desktop browsers can’t play protected video content in an HTML5 environment. So, it’s crucial to have the desktop fallback solution that’s provided by TVSDK 2.0.

Deploying to more screens in the future

In the future, HTML5 through EME and MSE will open up new possibilities for operators and programmers to get on even more screens. It provides a generic specification for browser manufacturers to build APIs that allow premium video experiences to be delivered in their browsers. Most consumer electronics manufacturers, traditional browser manufacturers, and content creators are now working towards HTML5 through EME and MSE as a standard means of delivery. For instance, both Chromecast and late model Samsung TVs use HTML5 through EME and MSE. Stay tuned as Adobe Primetime certifies these devices and others like them.

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