Some new LiveCycle TechNotes

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Here are a few new LiveCycle TechNotes that were published recently:
  • This TechNote describes how you can synchronize Tivoli dynamic LDAP groups with User Management ES/ES2.
  • This TechNote may help if you’re observing Process Management ES2 throughput issues for Oracle.
  • When an XDP form with relative references to images is rendered as an interactive PDF form through LiveCycle, and passed to the Output service for flattening or to the Assembler service for conversion to a PDF/A document, you may observe loss of images in the generated output. This TechNote lists a couple of workarounds for the issue.
To search for more LiveCycle TechNotes or TechNotes for other Adobe products, use the Only Adobe content option on the Search Community Help page.

FrameMaker, CMS, XML, and DITA eSeminars

Exciting news! Adobe is teaming up with partners to organize eSeminars on FrameMaker, CMS, XML, and DITA.

There are two eSeminars coming up in June:
  • Integrating Adobe FrameMaker 9 with Documentum to maximize content reuse with Linked2 on June 22
  • Sense out of Confusion: Streamline your Authoring by transitioning from unstructured to DITA XML on June 24
Stay tuned with RJ Jacquez’s blog for information about the contents of the eSeminars and to register.

LiveCycle ES2 Service Pack 1 available!

We recently released LiveCycle ES2 Service Pack 1 (SP1), a significant update to the LiveCycle server components, LiveCycle Workbench ES2, and LiveCycle Designer ES2. You can access the download page here. To download the service pack, you’ll need to log in using your Adobe ID and agree with the EULA.

The updated LiveCycle ES2 SP1 documentation is now live at the LiveCycle Developer Center. The SP1 ReadMe (PDF) describes how you can install the service pack for LiveCycle ES2 server, Workbench ES2, and Designer ES2. The ReadMe also lists the 80+ customer-reported issues that were addressed in this service pack.

To review the SP1 release notes for LiveCycle components, see this page. A related announcement on the LiveCycle Product Blog is here.

Follow this blog to catch more updates and announcements from the LiveCycle doc team.

Contribute to Adobe Community Help

In case you didn’t already know, you can contribute to the documentation for many Adobe products under the Adobe Community Help model. See this page for FAQ on Adobe Community Help. In short:

Adobe Community Help is a set of web services that provides instruction,
inspiration, and support. Community Help combines content from Adobe
Help, Support, Design Center, Developer Connection, and Forums – along
with great online community content – so that users can easily find the
best and most up-to-date resources. Community Help enables users to
contribute content and add comments to all learning content on
Adobe.com.

Your contributions can be in the form of tips, tricks, sample code, examples, comments, content-improvement suggestions, and more. A free Adobe.com account is all that you need to contribute. What’s more, if the moderators find your contribution helpful, they will reward you with Adobe Community Help points. Isn’t that cool?

Here are some other helpful links that will get you started:

Adobe Community Help Client (CHC)

Adobe has also created the Community Help Client (CHC), a next-generation AIR-based Help system that lets you make the most of Community Help content. See this page for information about downloading and installing CHC.

Mallika Yelandur, my colleague, has done a series of useful blog posts introducing the CHC and its features. Hop over to her blog!

Mesmerizing: Content-aware fill in Photoshop CS5

RJ Jacquez has posted a mesmerizing demo of the new content-aware fill feature in Photoshop CS5 on his blog. True, any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic!

Can’t wait to lay your hands on Creative Suite 5? Hold your horses for a few more days!

Enable PDF text edits for text embedded in a screenshot

Acrobat icon.jpgConsider you have to complete a UI content review for the product you work on. Wouldn’t things be easier if you could use Acrobat text-edit-markup features to highlight the relevant content embedded in images? Of course, you can always add a sticky note in an approximate location, but that isn’t quite as effective!

So how do you enable PDF text edits for embedded text? Here’s how:
  1. Paste the screenshot in your favorite word-processing or layout tool. For example, FrameMaker.
  2. Generate a PDF of the page containing the screenshot.
  3. Open the PDF in Acrobat and select Document > OCR Text Recognition > Recognize Text Using OCR.
  4. Once the text recognition process is over, you’ll be able to select the embedded text and use the Acrobat text edit tools on it.
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This Help article discusses Acrobat text edit features in greater detail. For more information about the OCR features in Acrobat 9, refer to this Help article.

Adobe Community Publishing System

Mallika Yelandur, my colleague from the Adobe Learning Resources team, has an interesting post about the Adobe Community Publishing System on her blog.

An excerpt:
“Adobe Community Publishing System (CPS) is an AIR application that lets anyone with an Adobe ID publish content to Adobe.com.
While the Help pages support only plain-text commenting, CPS lets community members contribute tips, movies, code snippets, and more with easy-to-use templates. Contributions are moderated by community experts. Plus, everyone in the community can rate and comment on contributions.
Tips to help you get started with the Community Publishing System are here.

My FrameMaker tweets

I have been tweeting recently about FrameMaker concepts and tips. In particular, I have been tweeting about the basics of structured authoring in FrameMaker. As I stumble upon interesting things, I plan to continue tweeting about the Technical Communication Suite.

You can access current (and future!) tweets at http://bit.ly/3MgV5P and http://bit.ly/3J1Oc1. Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/samarthav.

Do let me know your thoughts. If you want me to tweet about some particular feature in FrameMaker, do let me know as well.

Who am I?

Difficult question, eh! Well, I work with Adobe Systems as a technical writer. The primary product I document is LiveCycle. I have, in the past, also contributed to the documentation of Adobe Technical Communication Suite and Adobe eLearning Suite.

Through this blog, I plan to share my experiences, “discoveries”, and tips about these products that I use extensively, both at work and at home.

Also, I tweet fairly regularly. Catch me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/samarthav.

I hope you have a pleasant time reading my musings. Keep visiting this blog often!