A closer look at the Photoshop Generator syntax

- Joel Brandt and Samartha Vashishtha

The Photoshop Generator feature offers great flexibility in the ways you can rename layers/layer groups to specify size and quality parameters. Stepping beyond the recommendations in the Help article, this blog post looks at some valid variations that you can use while tagging layer/layer group names.

Before we begin, let’s look at the conventions followed in this blog post:

gradient_suffix-prefix

Space case

  • The filename portion of a layer/layer group name can include space characters. For example:
    250% Foo Bar Baz.gif
    Result: Generates a single file named Foo Bar Baz.gif scaled by 250%
  • While specifying absolute sizes, you can omit the space character between the height and the width. For example:
    100×80 foo.png
    Result: Generates a 100 px x 80 px-sized PNG file named foo.png
  • Do add a space character between the size parameter (prefix) and the layer name. For example:
    100×100 foo.png
  • You can omit the space character following the separator (, or +). For example, any of the following layer names generates two files—foo 1.png and foo 2.jpg—from the tagged layer:
    foo 1.png,foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png, foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png+foo 2.jpg
    foo 1.png + foo 2.jpg
  • Do not add a space character between an absolute size dimension and its unit. For example, the following layer names are invalid:
    80 x 100 px imagename.png
    4 in x100 imagename.png
    90 mm x120 cm imagename.png
  • Do not add a space character between the layer name and the suffix. For example, the following layer/layer group name is invalid:
    100×100 imagename.png 5%

Mixing units

While specifying the size parameter, it’s OK to mix and match the supported units—px, cm, mm, and in.

If no unit is specified for a dimension, Photoshop assumes it to be px.

Examples:

  • 80 x 100px foo.png
  • 4in x100 foo.png
  • 90mm x120cm foo.png

Wild cards

While specifying absolute sizes, you can use the ? wildcard in place of a dimension.

Examples:

  • 100x? foo.png
  • ?x60in foo.png

Hyphenated quality parameters

You can add a hyphen before the quality parameter (suffix) to make your layer/layer group names more readable.

Examples:

  • foo.png-8
  • foo.jpg-100%
  • foo.png-32

Some other Don’t’s

  • Don’t use unsupported units.
  • Don’t mix absolute and relative sizes. For example, the following layer name is not valid:
    50% 80×100 foo.png
  • Don’t specify out-of-bounds values. For example:
    foo.jpg-101%
    foo.png-42
    0% foo.png

That’s all for now! Hope you have fun using Generator and other exciting enhancements in the September 2013 release of Photoshop. In case you haven’t already reviewed the What’s New, here’s the link.

 

List of recent LiveCycle Quick Fixes

For a list of Quick Fixes available for Adobe LiveCycle ES2, ES2 SP1, ES2 SP2, and ES2.5, refer to this knowledgebase article. The Quick Fix list is categorized by version and LiveCycle components.

Once you’ve identified a Quick Fix that you want to apply, please get in touch with Adobe Enterprise Support for further details.

 

Content Services: WebSphere stops responding when many concurrent threads are running

When the storeContent operation for Content Services 9 is invoked with more than 30 threads, the WebSphere application server may stop responding.

Follow these steps to resolve the issue:

  1. In WebSphere Administrative Console, click Servers > Server Types > WebSphere application servers and then click a server name.
  2. In the right pane, click Thread pools under Additional Properties.
  3. Click WebContainer and, on the Configuration page, increase the value of the Maximum Size field by double the number of threads that you need to run. For example, increase the value of the Maximum Size field by 80 if you want to run 40 threads.
  4. Click Apply or OK.
  5. Click Save directly to the master configuration.
  6. Restart the WebSphere application server.

LiveCycle: Troubleshooting protocol for PDF Generator ES2

Jayan Kandathil has posted a really useful troubleshooting protocol for PDF Generator ES2 at the LiveCycle Product Blog. Here are the questions that Jayan suggests you consider while troubleshooting PDFG issues:

  • Is the operating system Windows?
  • Is the hardware sufficient?
  • Is the memory sufficient?
  • Is Microsoft Office installed (Windows only)?
  • Did you start Microsoft Office applications after the install and dismiss all dialogs?
  • Is Adobe Acrobat Professional 9 installed (Windows only)?
  • Is OpenOffice.org installed (Linux or Solaris only)?
  • Is the ‘Print Spooler’ service running?
  • Is the ‘Adobe PDF’ printer set as the default printer?
  • Did you start Acrobat Professional after the install and dismiss all dialogs?
  • Which Windows user’s credentials is PDF Generator running with?
  • Does the PDFGen.api file exist in the \Acrobat\plug_ins\ folder?
  • Is the System Readiness Tool happy?

For the complete blog post, visit this URL.

Content Services: Dependencies for indexing different types of content

Indexing of content in LiveCycle Content Services 9 depends on different LiveCycle ES2 components and services. Here are a few important prerequisites:

  • Indexing of PDF files (except for dynamic PDF forms) requires the Assembler service, which is part of all LiveCycle ES2 installations.
  • Indexing of dynamic PDF files requires LiveCycle Output 9. If Output is not installed, the FormDataIntegration service, available on all LiveCycle ES2 installations, is used instead. However, in such cases, for dynamic PDFs created in Acrobat, only the form data is indexed. The form design is left unindexed.
  • Indexing of Microsoft Word 2007/2010 files (.docx) requires PDF Generator 9 (the GeneratePDF service).
Additionally, files protected by LiveCycle Rights Management 9 are not indexed.

Content Services ES2: Improving performance

Thumbnail image for livecycle.jpg

You can disable content indexing to improve Content Services ES2 performance. However, keep in mind that disabling indexing will also disable text-based search within new content. To disable indexing:
  1. In the adobe-contentservices.ear file, navigate to
    LiveCycle Content Services.ear/contentservices.war/WEB-INF/classes/alfresco/model and open the contentModel.xml file for editing.
  2. Locate the following line:
    <type name=”cm:content”>
  3. Set the index enabled and tokenized properties to false.
  • Change <index enabled=”true”> to <index enabled=”false”>.
  • Change <tokenized>true </tokenised> to <tokenized>false </tokenised>.
For additional performance improvements, you can disable the conversions required for indexing. To disable conversions:
  1. In adobe-contentservices.ear, browse to
    contentservices.war\WEB-INF\classes\alfresco\extension.
  2. Preserve a backup of the custom-metadata-extractors-context file.
  3. Delete this file from the EAR.

RoboHelp tips article in Indus

RH-icon.jpgNandini Gupta and I recently contributed an article on our favorite RoboHelp tips to Indus, the newsletter of the India chapter of STC. Check out the article here!

The May issue of Indus carried an article on my favorite FrameMaker tips. Check that one out here!

FrameMaker tips article in Indus

FrameMaker iconI recently contributed an article on my favorite FrameMaker tips to Indus, the newsletter of the India chapter of STC. Check out the article here!

Embed a TOC in a FrameMaker document

FrameMaker iconLet’s discuss an easy way to embed a file-level TOC in a FrameMaker document. We’ll generate a standalone TOC for the document and then import it by reference into the same document.

Here’s how:

  1. Open the FrameMaker document.
  2. Click Special > Table of Contents. When FrameMaker prompts if you want to create a standalone TOC, say Yes.
  3. In the Set Up Table of Contents dialog, select the paragraph tags that you want to include in the TOC. Click Set. FrameMaker creates a separate TOC file and stores it in the directory where your FrameMaker document is stored.
  4. Open the new TOC and format it as necessary. You may want to change the font styles/sizes for the TOC paragraphs and set tab stops/leaders.
  5. 1.jpg

  6. Now, open the parent FrameMaker document, place the cursor at the intended insertion point (usually the beginning of the file), and then click File > Import > File. Select the external TOC file and click Import.
  7. Retain the default settings in the Import Text Flow by Reference dialog box and click Import. FramaMaker imports the TOC by reference into the parent document.
  8. 2.jpg

Now, whenever you update the external TOC, simply select the embedded text inset in the parent document and click Update in the Text Inset Properties pod.

3.jpg

Here’s some further suggested reading:

Top ten FrameMaker conversion tips

Simon Bate has posted his top ten FrameMaker conversion tips over at the Scriptorium blog. Pretty interesting stuff! Do take a look.

As for our FrameMaker tips that he refers to in his post, you can download the PDF from this link.

Enjoy!