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Archive for the WebKit Category

CSS Fragmentation In WebKit

What is fragmentation? The CSS 2.1 specification defines a box model to represent the layout of a document and pretty much everything is a box. Normal flow nodes (e.g. not absolutely positioned) are laid out child by child starting at the top of their parent element box. If an element’s box is too small to fit all the content,... Continue reading →

A look into Custom Filters reference implementation

Over the past two years, my team in Adobe has been actively working on the CSS Custom Filters specification (formerly CSS Shaders), which is just one part of the greater CSS Filters specification. Alongside the spec work, we have been working on the CSS Custom Filters WebKit implementation, so I’ve decided to write this blog... Continue reading →

Introduction to the Performance-Tests in WebKit

In this post I would like to give a short overview of WebKit’s performance and memory testing framework. Along with a bunch of WebKit geeks, I have been involved in the development process for a while, mostly from the side of contributions to memory-measurement. If I were to summarize the evolution of performance tests in... Continue reading →

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Exclusion Shape Coordinates Get Logical

Until recently, the code for calculating intersections between lines and exclusion shapes was using its own coordinate system. This was in addition to the two main coordinate systems used in WebKit, physical and logical (sometimes called abstract) from the CSS Writing Modes Specification. After some mulling, Hans decided to do some additional up-front processing and... Continue reading →

Capitalization change for regionlayoutupdate

If you have been experimenting with CSS Regions in Chrome Canary or some other browser built from WebKit trunk, there has been a minor change you may need to account for. If you have code that used the regionLayoutUpdate event, note that the capitalization of this event has changed to regionlayoutupdate to match other DOM... Continue reading →

A tale of CSS Regions and CSSOM: moving forward within the web community

Soon after we proposed the CSS Regions in 2011, it became obvious that we have to allow content creators a good APIs for interacting with CSS regions. In this regard, the CSS Object Model (CSSOM) addition to the W3C CSS Regions specification defined the appropriate mechanisms to determine if there are enough regions to flow... Continue reading →